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September 6, 2013

September 6, 2013

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The Decatur Daily
Democrat
75¢ at newstands
Inside
Page 12A
Squaws dump
Snider; AC’s
rally tops Luers
An independent newspaper serving Adams County, Indiana since 1857 Sept. 6, 2013 FRIDAY
IN BRIEF
Zion Lutheran
Church and School
announced that its
monthly newspaper and
cans recycling drive will
be held this Saturday
from 9 - 11:30 a.m. in
the church parking lot,
1010 W Monroe St.
Items accepted
include empty print-
er cartridges, old cell
phones and pagers,
Campbell’s soup labels,
Community Markets
/ Our Family UPC
labels and Box Tops for
Education.
The year-long proj-
ect, in which student
and parent volunteers
collect newspapers and
cans to recycle, pro-
vides funds for the Zion
seventh and eighth
grade class trip to
Washington D.C. next
school year.
Zion takes
recyclables
on Saturday
Heavy trash
collection
goes Monday
The fall heavy trash
collection in Decatur
will run from Monday,
September 9, through
Friday, September
13, city Operations
Manager Jeremy Gilbert
has announced.
Residents are asked
to have all items curb-
side no later than 7
a.m. The collection will
be made on the same
schedule as the weekly
trash/garbaqge pick-
ups, but some extreme-
ly large items may
require another day or
two. City crews will
not take the following
items:
•Homeimprovement
materials.
•Anyelectronics.
•Hazardouswaste.
•Carpeting.
This will be the last
heavy trash collec-
tion of 2013. The next
one will be in April of
2014.
Contact Us
By phone: 724-2121
By Fax: 724-7981
On The Web
www.decaturdaily
democrat.com
On this date
In 1916, the first self-
service grocery store,
Piggly Wiggly, was
opened in Memphis,
Tenn., by Clarence
Saunders.
In 1952, Canadian
television broadcasting
began in Montreal.
In 1997, a pub-
lic funeral was held
for Princess Diana at
Westminster Abbey in
London, six days after
her death in a car crash
in Paris.
Today’s Birthday:
New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie is 51.
SMILING AND FLYING ... Reese Loshe, 6, of Decatur, is all smiles as she
enjoyed an afternoon of swinging at Legion Park on Wednesday. (Photo by
Jannaya Andrews)
Make it 15, an unlucky
15. Today marks the 15th
consecutive day Decatur
has received no signifi-
cant rainfall.
And the National
Weather Service gives lit-
tle hope of that changing
in the days ahead.
Much of Indiana
keeps drying out with
little rainfall in recent
weeks, according to
an Associated Press
story. The U.S. Drought
Monitor’s weekly report
released Thursday lists
much of Indiana’s mid-
section and parts of its
northern counties as
abnormally dry, which is
the lowest drought con-
dition.
The report places 34
percent of the state in
that category, along with
2 percent sliver in north-
western Indiana in mod-
erate drought.
Decatur’s last sig-
nificant — more than a
trace — rainfall came on
Thursday, August 22,
when .75 of an inch was
measured at the city’s
weather station.
Fort Wayne’s last mea-
surable rain came on
the same day, .81 of an
inch.
The weather service
has measured just 1.15
of an inch of rain since
the start of August in
Indianapolis,
The weather bureau
says there is a 20 percent
chance of rain in Decatur
on Saturday night and a
40 percent chance next
Wednesday. Those are
the only mentions of rain
through next Thursday.
Meanwhile, relatively
mild conditions are due
to continue here, fore-
casters said.
A high near 80 is
expected in Decatur
today, followed by highs
in the low 80s Saturday
and Sunday. Monday is
likely to bring more of
the same, but conditions
will heat up Tuesday,
according to the weather
bureau, which predicts a
high around 90 degrees.
Today 15th
in row with
no rain here
Geneva veterans park
update given council
By MIKE LAMM
Pam Krause, representing both Geneva Proud
and the Chamber of Commerce, presented to
the Geneva Town Council this week an updated
report on the progress of the town’s Veteran’s
War Memorial Park, to be located next to the
village hall.
Krause noted the project “is in its early plan-
ning stages,” but preliminary estimates had
been obtained for portions of the project.
Site preparation and relocation of a large
boulder to be incorporated into the memorial
park is estimated to cost $5,000, while cost
of the planned pavilion with a concrete slab is
estimated at $33,000.
Krause added that fundraising to date totals
$5,134.44, and that the second phase of the
projectwillinvolvethesaleofpersonalizedpav-
ing stones for sidewalks at the memorial site.
The project, Krause stated, is a joint venture
between the town’s parks department, Geneva
Proud,theVFWandtheAmericanLegion.
City woman facing
numerous charges
Charges levied against a Decatur
woman have been announced follow-
ing her arrest last Saturday after she
allegedly struck a pedestrian with her
vehicle and then argued with witnesses
and Decatur police officers.
Alicia M. Susnjar, 34, Piedmont
Lane, Decatur, remained in custo-
dy Thursday under a $50,000 surety
bond.
She is charged with intimidation,
battery by bodily waste (spitting on a
police officer), resisting law enforce-
ment, criminal recklessness with the
use of a vehicle, disorderly conduct
for making unreasonable noise and
continuing to do so after being asked
to stop, battery with bodily injury on
a police officer, and battery by know-
ingly or intentionally touching another
person in a rude, insolent, or angry
manner.
Police reports said wit-
nesses told them Susnjar
drove her van westbound
on Bellmont Boulevard
nearClermontAvenueat
10:20 a.m. Saturday at
“full speed” and attempt-
ed to crush a pedestrian
between her van and a
parked vehicle.
After hitting the pedestrian, she
allegedly drove down the street, made a
large u-turn through several yards and
then came back, threatening to go after
one of the witnesses.
She then exited her vehicle and the
police report alleges that she engaged
in a physical fight with one of the wit-
nesses.
A Decatur man who was the
subject of an intensive manhunt
earlier this year has sentenced
to six years in prison.
Wade R. Crone, 27, pleaded
guilty in two separate cases. In
case one he plead-
ed to possession of
a controlled sub-
stance and posses-
sion of marijuana,
both class D felo-
nies. In case two,
he pleaded to crim-
inal confinement, a
class D felony.
Crone was handed three-
year terms for each by Superior
Court Judge Patrick R. Miller,
and was ordered to pay $168
in court costs and $472.78 in
restitution.
Authorities here had been
searching for Crone for some
time when, on February 11, he
was reported to be in a house in
the 1200 block of Master Drive
and was believed to be car-
rying multiple handguns. The
Indiana State Police Emergency
Response Team (ERT) entered
the home — first throwing an
explosive device inside — but
found no one there.
He was arrested in Holland,
Michigan, on February 27 and
returned here a short time
later.
Susnjar
Raptors to be featured
in program on Saturday
Soarin’ Hawk, a nonprof-
it organization located in
Allen County, will present
“Creature Feature,” a public
program at Limberlost State
Historic Site this Saturday
from 11 a.m. to noon. The
event will take place in the
Limberlost Visitor Center,
located next door to the his-
toric site.
“We are pretty excited
about this program and look
forward to seeing the live
birds that Soarin’ Hawk will
be bringing to the Limberlost”,
said Randy Lehman, man-
ager of Limberlost State
HistoricSite.
Soarin’ Hawk will bring a
variety of birds of prey for
the audience to see and learn
about, including a red-shoul-
dered hawk and a long-eared
owl. The nonprofit is dedi-
cated to the rescue, recovery
and release of orphaned and
injured birds of prey.
The birds brought to the
presentation are non-releas-
able and serve as ambassa-
dors for their species.
“Gene Stratton-Porter
lived near the Limberlost
swamp for 24 years and pho-
tographed and wrote about
various raptors in the area as
well as in Northeast Indiana
in her nature study books,”
Lehman added.
“In her book Music of the
Wild, she expressed her fond-
ness for screech owls and
called hawks the ‘kings of the
treetops,’ so we are inviting
everyone out to Limberlost
to honor the ‘kings’ and their
kin.”
Admission to the event
will be $2.
For more information on
Limberlost programs, contact
Curt Burnette, 368-7428, or
by email at cburnette@indi-
anamuseum.org.
Crone is sent to prison
Crone
Monroe council moving on budget
BY ASHLEY THIEME
The first of two hearings
on the 2014 budget was held
at Thursday’s Monroe Town
Council Meeting.
The overall proposed gener-
al funds budget for 2014 is
$227,570, up from $225,730.
The total budget for 2014,
according to official documents,
is $396,800, up from last year’s
$391,900.
Council President Al Lehman
emphasized the budgets for
Roads and Streets is down
$2,000 while parks and recre-
ation is down $400.
The biggest increase came in
theMotorVehicleHighwayfund,
which jumped to $114,430 a
$5460 increase from 2012.
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 2A • Friday, September 6, 2013
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Digital Views
By Mark Turner
Cold-hearted killer
Biographical movies
have provided entertain-
ment to film-going fans
for years. At the same
time, more often than not
their portrayals of what
their stories are about
rarely reflects the reality
of the person. While this
is the case with the new
release THE ICEMAN
perhaps it’s best to write
about it as a film rather
than history. That being
said, this is a dynamite
crime drama for fans of
the genre.
Michael Shannon
stars as Richard “Richie”
Kuklinski, a low-level
criminal making film cop-
ies of porno flicks back
in the ‘60s whose life
changes when he meets
Roy Demeo (Ray Liotta).
Married with one child,
Kuklinski’s lack of fear
in the face of a danger
makes Demeo consider
him a possibility for an
enforcer’s position. When
he has Richie kill a bum
just to show him he can
kill without conscience,
the position becomes
his.
What follows is three
decades of Richie doing
what he’s best at which
is killing people. When
Demeo has someone who
needs to be reminded to
pay his debts, he sends
Richie. If they don’t fol-
low through, Richie
returns and the prob-
lem is erased. Soon peo-
ple have good reason to
make sure they pay on
time.
While doing one hit
for Demeo, Richie runs
into “Mr. Freezy” (Chris
Evans), another hit man
so named because he
also drives an ice cream
truck from neighborhood
to neighborhood. Not
only does this make for
a great cover but the
freezer inside the truck
is a convenient place to
store a dead body.
As the story progress-
es problems come up
and Demeo tells Richie to
take a break, stop killing
people and not to take
any work on the side.
With bills piling up Richie
finds himself forced to
break that promise, con-
tacts Mr. Freezy and the
duo begin piling up bod-
ies and cash for con-
tracts.
When Demeo discov-
ers this he threatens
Richie and things begin
to unwind for the hired
gun. A combination of
paranoia, real threats
and a violent rage fueled
temper that Richie always
tries to keep in check will
not result in anything
positive.
But just what happens
and who it happens to is
yet to be seen.
Michael Shannon
has become a force to
behold in films these
days. It’s not just his
physical presence that
exudes danger here but
the performance offers a
depth of character mov-
ies like this usually don’t
possess. Liotta seems
to have calmed down in
recent films as he does
here but one can’t help
but see the same inten-
sity in Shannon that
Liotta once brought to
similar roles. Winona
Ryder, long missing from
movies, turns in a great
performance as well as
Deborah, Richie’s wife
and true love.
What is depicted here
is the tale of a man who
wants what’s best for
his family, to provide for
them as much as pos-
sible and who is willing
to do anything to insure
that their every dream is
fulfilled. The movie pres-
ents Kuklinski as a sym-
pathetic character that
we wish could find an
escape from the world
he has chosen to be with
his family. Unfortunately
that wasn’t the reality of
the Richard Kuklinski.
The movie may make for
a great story and well
made film, but it does so
by changing most of the
true story into something
else.
While an afterward
mentions that Kuklinski
is estimated to have
killed 100 people before
the ending presented
here it rarely discusses
NASTY — Michael
Shannon portrays pro-
fessional killer Richard
Kuklinski in THE ICEMAN.
(Photo provided)
his victims. I could be
wrong but I also don’t
think most of us would
decide that the best way
to provide for our families
would be to begin kill-
ing people which here is
presented as Kuklinski’s
best option.
More changes between
his real story as told in
the book THE ICEMAN:
THE TRUE STORY OF A
COLD BLOODED KILL by
Anthony Bruno and what
we’re presented with here
are best left to those
interested in the book. If
all you see is the film you
will be entertained. But
the real story is just as
interesting.
Past Digital Views
reviews, other current
reviews and more can be
found online at http://
dvddigitalviews.blogspot.
com
7 defendants,
7 guilty pleas
Seven defendants
pleaded guilty before
Judge Patrick R. Miller
during a recent session of
Adams Superior Court.
Brian C. Bultemeier,
30, Decatur, pleaded
guilty to invasion of pri-
vacy. He was sentenced
to a 365 days in jail, all
but 10 days suspended,
and must pay $168 in
court costs.
Anthony Castleman,
27, Huntington pleaded
guilty to battery resulting
in bodily injury. He was
sentenced to 14 days in
jail and ordered to pay
$168 in court costs.
Cassandra N
McDonald, who pleaded
guilty to driving while
suspended, was sen-
tenced to 365 days in
jail, all suspended. She
was given 365 days pro-
bation, 40 hours com-
munity service, received
a 90-day license suspen-
sion and was ordered to
pay $168 in court costs.
Donald D. Mahon II,
36, Markle pleaded guilty
to violation of probation.
She was ordered to con-
tinue with probation as
ordered.
Kimberly A. Sturgeon,
47, Convoy, Ohio plead-
ed guilty to obtaining or
attempting to obtain leg-
end drugs by using a
false name or address.
She was sentenced to
545 days in jail with 525
suspended and 20 days
time served.
Sturgeon was given
545 days of probation,
ordered to complete
addiction services and a
Thinking for Good pro-
gram, must pay $275
probation fees, $368
court costs, and $100
attorney fees.
Jason L. Wycuff, 18,
Celina, Ohio pleaded
guilty to illegal con-
sumption of alcohol. He
was given 60 days in
jail, all suspended. He is
ordered to complete one
year of probation and
an addiction/ substance
abuse program, and was
ordered to pay $50 in
probation fees and $168
in court costs.
Berne has opening
for a police offcer
driver’s license; possess
a high school diploma or
GED equivalency; have
no felony or domestic
battery convictions on
their record; submit to
both a criminal history
background check and a
credit history check.
Qualifying applicants
will be contacted and
must complete and pass
all testing requirements
established by the Berne
Police Department.
For added information,
contact the department:
589-2169.
The Berne Police
Department will accept
applications for a patrol
officer position from Sept.
9 through Sept. 20.
According to a press
release from Nancy
Lindsey, Berne Police
Department administra-
tive assistant, interested
applicants may pick up
application information
at the department, 1160
W. Main St., Berne.
Applicants must meet
the following require-
ments: 21-35 years of age,
possess a valid Indiana
Inmate gestures prompt window covering
The Adams County
Commissioners will hold
their weekly meeting on
Monday, September 9, at
1:30 p.m. in Room 100A
of the Service Complex.
Items on the agenda
include reports from the
auditor, county engineer,
highway department,
building maintenance,
and a report on the
Vietnam Memorial given
by Jan Smith and John
Lee.
Saturday is the final
day to have events includ-
ed in the Callithumpian
brochure for 2013,
according to Chamber of
Commerce officials.
Saturday last day to get
in Callithumpian brochure
Groups or organiza-
tions who wish to list
events or ads in the bro-
chure should visit the
Chamber office, 125 E
Monroe St.; call the office,
724-2604; or go online
to http://www.decatur-
chamber.org/.
Agenda ready
MUNCIE, Ind. (AP) —
A large jail in central
Indiana now has a frosted
film over its cell windows
after years of troubles
with inmates communi-
cating and sometimes
making obscene gestures
to people outside.
The film placed over
the Delaware County
Jail’s windows last week
allows daylight into
the cells, but prevents
inmates from seeing out,
Sheriff Mike Scroggins
told The Star Press.
It has been a common
site since the jail opened
in 1992 to see friends
and family members
of inmates signaling or
writing sidewalk messag-
es to them. Inmates have
also sometimes made
lewd gestures or exposed
themselves to passersby
in downtown Muncie.
Scroggins said the
window frosting cost less
than $100 on the dozens
of narrow windows for
the cells holding up to
275 inmates at a time.
‘‘The idea is to keep
the inmates from com-
municating with people
outside and also being
a nuisance with lewd
behavior,’’ he said.
Inmate Terry Shaw,
who’s in the jail on rob-
bery charges, said the
loss of an outside view
from his cell makes his
jail time even more iso-
lating.
‘‘I know they have
problems because of all
the guys who want to
beat on the windows and
not act right,’’ he said.
‘‘But it’s really kind of
hard, you can’t look out
and see any sunlight or
trees or birds or any-
thing like that.’’
The sheriff had asked
the county commission-
ers about a possible
ordinance prohibiting
loitering outside the jail
and ‘‘non-verbal commu-
nication’’ with inmates.
But Scroggins said that
step will no longer be
necessary with the new
window frosting.
Scroggins said he’s
had inmates make
obscene gestures toward
him when he’s walked
outside the jail and that
the same thing has hap-
pened to the general
public.
‘‘It’s OK to look up if
you hear tapping on the
glass,’’ he said. ‘‘No more
lewd gestures.’’
Carmel High cleaning as MRSA found
CARMEL, Ind. (AP) — Officials at one of Indiana’s
largest high schools say sports locker rooms have
been cleaned after two students were found to have
the staph infection MRSA.
Carmel High School officials sent a letter to par-
ents Tuesday telling them of the skin infections at
the school of nearly 4,700 students. WTHR-TV and
WRTV report school officials said a locker room was
believed the source of the bacteria.
Athletic trainers at the suburban Indianapolis
school first noticed the infections and sent the stu-
dents to get medical care.
Health experts say MRSA thrives in warm, damp
environments like showers, locker rooms and other
bathroom fixtures.
Standards up, USI enrollment down
EVANSVILLE, Ind. (AP) — University of Southern
Indiana officials say higher academic standards
could be the cause of a drop in enrollment.
The Evansville Courier & Press reports that 565
fewer students are on campus this fall than at the
same time last year.
USI President Linda Bennett stands by the tough-
er academic standards. School officials note that the
1,709 new freshmen admitted this year represent
average SAT scores six points higher than last year’s
class, and an increase of 51 points over the last three
years.
School officials say the percentage of students who
might not be as prepared to succeed in college has
been cut from 8 percent of the student body to just a
little over 1 percent.
Conservative fights gay marriage ban
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A veteran of Republican
political campaigns is leading the fight against a GOP
effort to amend Indiana’s constitution to bar same-
sex marriage.
Megan Robertson describes herself as a conserva-
tive but acknowledges that her new role with Freedom
Indiana coalition puts her at odds with many in her
own party.
The 31-year-old Robertson is gay.
She says she thinks many Republicans are ready to
speak out against a ban. Indiana law already defines
marriage as between one man and one woman.
Indiana’s proposed amendment would bar same-
sex marriage and civil unions. Robertson says that
would make it one of the nation’s most extensive
bans.
Business leaders say a ban could make it harder
for them to attract new economic development.
Gary plans movie night at park
GARY, Ind. (AP) — The city of Gary doesn’t have a
movie theater, so it is plans to show a pair of movies
tonight at Marquette Park near Lake Michigan and is
looking at making it a monthly event.
Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson says the goal is pro-
vide a fun night for families. The movies Friday will
be ‘‘The Croods’’ and ‘‘The Tree of Life.’’
The cost is $10 per car, and moviegoers will be
able to listen using their car radios.
In an attempt to create a drive-in theater effect,
there will be vendors selling movie snacks including
popcorn, hotdogs and elephant ears.
There will also be an inflatable fun area for chil-
dren.
The goal is to have a movie night the first Friday of
each month from May to October.
Check out our Classifeds
Decatur Daily Democrat
Friday, September 6, 2013 • Page 3A For the record
Your Local Weather
Fri
9/6
78/57
Plenty of sun.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the upper
50s.
Sat
9/7
88/63
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
upper 80s
and lows in
the low 60s.
Sun
9/8
83/60
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.
Mon
9/9
82/61
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.
Tue
9/10
85/65
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
From Decatur High 80 7 a.m. 47
weather station Low 46 River 2.52 ft.
Precip 0 Degree days —
Obituaries
traffic
blOtter
Voucher benefits
and special ed
grants clarified
Bunches of blue
disabled placards
in many US cities
Joseph S. Klarke Jr.
Joseph S. Klarke Jr., 60, of Hoagland, died
Tuesday at his residence.
Among survivors are two sons, Uriah Klarke of
Monroe and Robert Klarke of Fort Wayne; two daugh-
ters, Hannah (Bryce) Arnold of Bluffton and Lydia
(Kevin) Fox of Berne; two sisters, Roseanne Jackson
of Florida and Evie (Frank) Fuhrman of Decatur.
Friends will be received from 6-7 p.m. on Sunday
at Zwick and Jahn Funeral Home. Funeral services
will be at 7 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home.
By STEVEN DUBOIS
Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP)
— A blue placard dan-
gling from the rear-view
mirror is the equivalent
of parking gold for driv-
ers in many cities — they
can park for free and for
as long as they want.
Now there’s a gold rush
on for them.
And as the number of
vehicles displaying a dis-
abled placard has soared
with an aging population
and loosened eligibility
standards, cities are see-
ing the impact in more
congested downtowns
and the loss of millions
of dollars in revenue.
Now, officials are
pushing back, tighten-
ing standards for those
who can get the placards
and making sure that the
only people who get the
privilege are those who
really need it.
‘‘It was astonishing to
see car after car after
car with the disabled
placard,’’ said Portland
City Commissioner Steve
Novick, who is seeking a
solution to the problem
in a city with a repu-
tation for bicycling and
mass transit but still
reliant on the car.
It’s common in the city
to find blocks in which
there are more cars with
placards than without.
Stroll by a parking meter
and you will see the plac-
ards through the wind-
shields of both beaters
and BMWs.
In the city’s annual
survey of roughly 9,000
downtown meters, just
over 1,000 vehicles
had disabled placards
in October 2012, a 72
percent increase in five
years. In the core area of
downtown, a third of the
vehicles had placards.
As a result, Portland
lost an estimated $2.4
million in meter revenue
last year, and the lack
of turnover frustrates
store owners, deprives
the severely disabled of
spaces near their desti-
nation and forces drivers
to circle blocks in search
of a spot.
Authorities issued 186
citations for unlawful
use of a permit the fis-
cal year ending June 30,
but believe there is more
abuse.
Cheaters are tough to
catch because the plac-
ard is generally valid and
the driver, who may be
borrowing one, is only
at the car for a couple
of minutes during the
workday.
Experts say the easi-
est way to stop abuse
is to make the disabled
pay the meter, especial-
ly those not in wheel-
chairs. Places such as
Philadelphia, Raleigh,
N.C., and Arlington
County, Va., did so and
there was more turnover
in the spots.
The Illinois Legislature
passed a law that takes
effect next year in which
free-metered parking will
be reserved for only the
most severely disabled
residents. It was spurred
in part by Chicago’s deci-
sion to privatize its park-
ing meters. As part of the
deal, it agreed to reim-
burse the company for
free parking provided to
holders of disabled plac-
ards. The tab since 2009:
$55 million.
‘‘Economically, a free
parking pass is a very
nice thing to have, and
there are always enough
people who are a bit
unscrupulous when it
comes to parking that
you can’t expect self-
restraint,’’ said Donald
Shoup, a UCLA urban
planning professor and
author of ‘‘The High Cost
of Free Parking.’’
One of Shoup’s for-
mer students, Jonathan
Williams, researched
curbside parking in Los
Angeles while getting his
master’s degree, finding
that cars with placards
took most spots when
the workday began and
often didn’t leave until it
ended.
On one block in the
financial district, plac-
ards consumed 80 per-
cent of the total meter
hours. Though the spac-
es were occupied 95 per-
cent of the time, meters
that charged $4 an hour
collected an average of
only 28 cents an hour.
California started
issuing placards in 1959
to people unable to move
without a wheelchair.
Within two decades, it
was expanded to include
people with breathing
problems and general
mobility problems.
‘‘We looked back from
1990 to 2010, even
normalized for popula-
tion growth, there was a
350 percent increase in
the number of placards
issued in California,’’
Williams said. ‘‘Even
if there was no abuse,
there are a lot of plac-
ards in circulation.’’
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— Low-income families
with children who have
disabilities can choose
to continue receive spe-
cial education services at
public schools, Attorney
General Greg Zoeller
said in a legal opinion
Wednesday.
A parent or guardian
need not accept both a
voucher and a special
education grant, Zoeller
said, and can choose to
continue receiving spe-
cial education services
for the student from a
nearby public school.
‘‘The legislative intent
was to provide the par-
ents of children with dis-
abilities more choices,
not fewer,’’ Zoeller wrote
in the non-binding opin-
ion.
Under Indiana law,
students who receive
vouchers to attend a pri-
vate school remain eligi-
ble for special education
services from the public
school, Zoeller said.
Private schools accept-
ing vouchers are not
required to accept chil-
dren with disabilities and
would likely refuse enroll-
ment because they lack
resources to implement
service plans for those
students or do not wish
to comply with special
education grant require-
ments, Zoeller said.
The legal opinion
came at the request of
the Indiana Department
of Education and State
Board of Education,
Zoeller said. Officials had
questions about wheth-
er a public school is
required to provide spe-
cial education and relat-
ed services to a disabled
student who receives a
voucher.
Attorney general legal
opinions are intended to
help state officials with
complicated issues.
Two Booked In
Two individuals were
booked in Thursday at
the county jail.
Ronald S. Crawley,
48, Washington Street,
Decatur, was arrested
by the Adams County
Sheriff’s Department on
a warrant charging him
with theft. He remained
in custody today under a
$300 cash and $11,250
surety bond.
Cassandra N.
McDonald, 23, rural
Decatur, was charged
on a warrant for driving
while suspended. She
was booked in and then
ordered released under
her own recognizance.
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— Gov. Mike Pence left
Thursday on his first
overseas trade mission
as governor, taking along
more than 40 political
and business leaders to
Japan, but the mayor of
Evansville stayed behind
to deal with local issues.
The trade delegation
flew out of Indianapolis
for a nine-day trip
through Tokyo, Nagoya
and Tochigi Prefecture,
Indiana’s Japanese sister
state. First lady Karen
Pence and daughter
Charlotte are joining offi-
cials from the Indiana
Economic Development
Corp. on the trip. Local
development leaders and
business owners, consul-
tants and lawyers round
out the delegation.
The cost of the trip is
being paid for by private
donations to the Indiana
Economic Development
Foundation.
‘‘Japan is Indiana’s
largest foreign direct
investor and there is
immense opportunity to
fortify relationships with
Japanese companies and
secure even more jobs for
Hoosiers,’’ Pence said in
a statement.
Evansville Mayor Lloyd
Winnecke said, however,
he would have to stay
behind. Winnecke told
the Evansville Courier
& Press Wednesday
that ongoing discus-
sions regarding the city’s
downtown convention
hotel project are the
main reason he’s stay-
ing home. A City Council
vote on the project’s pub-
lic financing is scheduled
for Monday.
Winnecke’s decision
leaves the mayors of the
small cities of Logansport
and Elwood as the only
other elected officials
joining Pence on the
trip.
Pence plans to attend
the Japan-U.S. Midwest
Conference and meet with
government and busi-
ness leaders, including
executives from Japanese
companies with Indiana
operations. The delega-
tion plans to meet with
leaders of Honda, Toyota,
Fuji and other manufac-
turers doing business in
the state. They will also
meet with leaders from
Mitsui mining, Sony and
Mitsubishi.
COLUMBUS, Ohio
(AP) — Cleveland kidnap-
per Ariel Castro said he
called the mother of one
of his captives and told
the woman her daugh-
ter was alive and had
become his wife, accord-
ing to a videotaped FBI
interrogation.
Castro also told inves-
tigators that authorities
missed opportunities to
capture him while he held
the three women captive
for more than a decade
in a house with boarded
up windows where they
were repeatedly beaten
and raped.
Castro says in the
video — obtained by NBC
and first reported Friday
on the ‘‘Today’’ show
— that he told Berry’s
mother that her daugh-
ter was OK. He says he
made the call on Amanda
Berry’s cellphone.
‘‘I think I said some-
thing ... that I have her
daughter and that she’s
OK, and that she’s my
wife now — something
like that, you know,
probably not the exact
words,’’ he told investiga-
tors.
When asked for the
mother’s response,
Castro said: ‘‘I hung up
so we didn’t have a con-
versation.’’
Castro, 53, was a
month into his life sen-
tence when he committed
suicide Tuesday night.
Castro also told inves-
tigators that authorities
missed opportunities
for catching him while
he held the kidnapped
women, who were ages
14, 16 and 20 when cap-
tured.
Castro told investi-
gators that cameras at
the school of victim Gina
DeJesus should have
captured him there 15
minutes before she was
abducted.
Trio Ticketed
Three drivers were
charged with vehicular
infractions on Thursday
by the Decatur Police
Department:
James E. Dobbins, 31,
rural Preble, for a child
restraint seat violation
and having a false or fic-
titious registration for his
vehicle; Jose F. Rangel,
17, 17th Street, Decatur,
no helmet while operat-
ing a motorized bicycle;
and Shari L. White, 47,
E. Main Street, Berne,
going the wrong way on a
one-way street in the 700
block of N. Third Street,
Decatur.
Speeding Tickets
Two drivers were
stopped on Thursday
by the Adams County
Sheriff’s Department for
speeding:
Chris A. Emenhiser,
46, Monroeville, and
Tonya S. Emenhiser, 36,
Monroeville, both for 65
mph in a 55 zone at S.R.
101 and C.R. 1000N.
By DARREL RADFORD
The Courier-Times
MIDDLETOWN, Ind. (AP) — Some
Shenandoah students spent part of their
day outside recently, watching a unique
energy source rise over the northwestern
Henry County landscape — one that in
the not-too-distant future will power their
classrooms.
Barring any major problems, a project to
erect the wind turbine — three years in the
making — will be assembled and ready for
use soon.
Officials from Shenandoah said there
had only been a couple of minor glitches in
the construction process.
Tony Kuykendall, business develop-
ment manager for Performance Services
of Indianapolis, told The Courier-Times
the Henry County school corporation was
joining select company with its wind tur-
bine project. He said Shenandoah was the
seventh project ‘‘of this size and scale’’ the
company had done and the only one in
Henry County.
Randolph Eastern schools, Union City,
Tippecanoe Valley, West Central, North
Newton and Northwestern are others
Kuykendall said his firm has worked with
to erect wind turbines. He said the city
of Winchester is scheduled to add one in
2014.
‘‘These projects are complex and take
a long time to develop,’’ Kuykendall said.
‘‘There is an awful lot of due diligence up
front. You need a school corporation willing
to invest in that timeline.’’
The payoff — both in dollars saved and
lessons learned — is well worth the trou-
ble, according to multiple school officials.
Kuykendall said the Shenandoah School
Corp. should see the energy generated
result in saving 85 percent of their utility
bill by the second year of operation. He
said the turbine was capable of producing 2
million kilowatt hours of electricity over the
course of a year.
Motorists will see the blades turning
about 75 percent of the time, according to
Kuykendall.
‘‘In June, July and August, the winds are
very mild,’’ Kuykendall said. ‘‘But during
the other nine months, you will see it turn-
ing almost every day.’’
Some patrons expressed concern about
noise. Others were worried about danger to
bats and birds. Kuykendall assured that all
of those issues will be addressed.
‘‘Is it loud? It’s more likely your home
air-conditioning unit will be louder than
the impact of the wind turbine itself,’’
Kuykendall said.
‘‘Will it be bad for bats and birds? We will
actually modify the turbine speed during
the migratory season for the Indiana bat
from Aug. 15 to Oct. 15,’’ he added.
Wind turbine to power classrooms in Henry County
Blowin’ in the wind
8-foot boa missing
...but not to worry
NOBLESVILLE, Ind. (AP) — Animal control
workers in an Indianapolis suburb have been
trying to help find an 8-foot long red tail boa
constrictor.
The Noblesville owner of the pet snake says
it got away Monday from a home in a neighbor-
hood of the city north of Indianapolis.
Hamilton County Animal Control coordi-
nator Tom Rogers told WTHR-TV that such
snakes can be quite elusive.
Rogers says that while many people are
scared of snakes, the boa constrictor poses
the greatest threat to small animals. He says a
small rabbit is likely the largest animal it would
eat
Pence departs for
a nine-day trade
mission to Japan
Report says Ohio
kidnapper called
mother of 1 victim
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 4A • Friday, September 6, 2013 OpiniOn
The DecaTur Daily DemocraT
Ron Storey, Publisher
Bob Shraluka
Managing Editor
J Swygart
Opinion Page Editor
The winning
coalition on Syria
By Cokie RoBeRts
and steven v. RoBeRts
Most Congressional votes follow strict party lines
these days. But the resolution authorizing the presi-
dent to strike at Syria for using nerve gas against its
own people scrambles those polarizing propensities.
Both parties are divided, and the president can
only prevail by fashioning the sort of bipartisan coali-
tion he has tried — and largely failed — to build
around other issues.
Since the early ‘70s, the GOP has portrayed itself
as more willing and able than the Democrats to
employ American power. That tradition of robust mili-
tary response helped generate widespread Republican
support for President Bush’s decision to invade Iraq
after 9/11.
That tradition endures today, primarily in what
might be called the interventionist wing of the
Republican Party. And in those circles, it overrides
the fact that the president is now a Democrat, not a
Republican.
Speaker John Boehner reflected that tradition in
a statement endorsing Obama’s decision on Syria:
“Only the United States has the capacity and capabil-
ity to stop (Syrian President) Assad or warn others
around the world that this type of behavior will not be
tolerated.”
Some Republicans are drawing on another tradi-
tion, embodied in the old adage “politics stops at the
water’s edge.” Not all issues should be viewed through
a political prism. The national interest still matters.
Rep. Mike Rogers, the chairman of the House
Intelligence Committee, invoked that principle when
he asserted on CNN, “This is a national security issue.
This isn’t about Barack Obama versus the Congress.
This isn’t about Republicans versus Democrats.”
Added Sen. John McCain: “A rejection of this resolu-
tion would be catastrophic ... for the institution of the
presidency and the credibility of the United States.”
A third Republican faction is impelled to support
the president because it believes the real target of his
“shot across the bow” is not Syria but Iran, a country
whose nuclear ambitions pose a much greater threat
to American — and Israeli — interests than the Assad
regime in Damascus.
“The connection between Syria and Iran is clear as
a bell,” Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said
on PBS.
Those arguments are not working, however, with
the isolationist wing of the Republican Party. Sen.
Rand Paul rejects the essence of Boehner’s position.
“I don’t see American interests involved on either
side of the Syrian war,” he said on NBC’s “Meet the
Press.”
For others, the legacy of interventionism has taken
its toll on Republican voters. “My constituents are
war-weary,” Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia said on
CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “They don’t want to see us get
involved in this.”
This weariness is reinforced for some Republicans
by an adamant hostility toward President Obama,
even when he espouses a policy they might otherwise
support. “There are plenty of conservatives who are
not isolationists who don’t trust Obama to conduct
foreign policy,” a GOP strategist told the Washington
Examiner. “They’re not comfortable risking American
troops with Obama as commander-in-chief.”
The Republican divisions are more visible, but
Democrats have their own problems. The war-wea-
riness Sen. Chambliss mentions is even more pro-
nounced among liberals who opposed the Iraq war in
the first place. Only 29 percent of Democrats favor air
strikes, according to a new Pew poll and that fatigue
is compounded by confusion over where the presi-
dent’s strategy could lead.
“(The) aftermath of a U.S. strike on targets in Syria
is difficult to predict, with negative consequences that
may be beyond our capability to control,” warned
Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts.
But even longstanding Democratic doves are more
willing to use force when it comes to defending Israel
and deterring Iran, and that’s why the administra-
tion is vigorously pushing that angle. Secretary of
State John Kerry even compared Syria’s Assad to
Adolf Hitler and Saddam Hussein, and the argument
is working with lawmakers like Eliot Engel of New
York.
“If we stand idly by,” Engel said on NBC’s “Today,”
“then every despot in the world thinks they can com-
mit war crimes and no one will do anything.”
Obama’s best argument with Democrats, how-
ever, is self-interest. He will be president for more
than three more years. Many issues Democrats care
about are coming up on Capitol Hill: immigration, tax
reform, entitlement spending. These legislators are
stronger if he is stronger, and losing the Syrian vote
would diminish the president’s leverage in all those
battles.
So here’s the key to a winning coalition: liberal
Democrats who want to strengthen the president and
conservative Republicans who want to strengthen the
presidency. Our bet is they will narrowly prevail.
There we go again
Any U.S. war with Syria
will turn out badly
By DonALD kAUL
So we’re going to war in Syria. Maybe.
We won’t know for sure until Congress
gets back from the vacation it’s taking
from its other vacations.
One can live in hope, however. What
would autumn be without a fresh war
in the Middle East to occupy us?
I know, the Obama-Bush adminis-
tration is saying that it’s not going to
be a real war, that we’re simply going to
conduct a punitive raid to teach Syrian
leader Bashar al-Assad a lesson.
But you know how those things
go. One lesson leads to another, and
before you know it,
we’re bombing cities to
save them, sending in
troops, and rebuilding
the society we helped
knock down.
After that formula
worked so well in places
like Iraq, Afghanistan,
and Libya, it’s no won-
der President Barack
Obama wants to try it
in Syria.
The desire for a Syrian raid, accord-
ing to occasionally reliable sources,
arises from a box of red crayons that
Obama keeps in his desk drawer in the
Oval Office. Every once in a while he
takes one out and draws a line in front
of some action that an enemy power
must not cross. With Iran, it’s the pro-
duction of a nuclear bomb. With Syria,
it’s the use of poison gas.
Well, to make a long story short,
Assad seems to have used poison gas
on his own people and thus must be
punished.
You see, it’s OK to bomb people with
conventional weapons or to incinerate
them with napalm (as we ourselves did
many times in Vietnam) or to put them
in jail and torture them (remember Abu
Ghraib?). It’s OK to mine farm fields so
that long after a war is over peasants
will be blowing off limbs on a consistent
basis.
It’s even OK to obliterate entire cities
with a single bomb that vaporizes all in
its path. (Maybe not OK exactly but per-
fectly understandable under the proper
circumstances.) But if you use poison
gas, you are a monster and a lowlife.
Who can argue with logic like that?
Some do, of course. Not only do
Russia and China (always the spoil-
sports) object to the proposed U.S.
action, but the British parliament has
refused to go along with it. It seems that
many Brits remember being fooled into
helping out with the Iraq War only to
find that the dreaded “weapons of mass
destruction” were a figment of Dick
Cheney’s imagination. They’ve seen that
movie and they don’t like the ending.
The nice thing about being an
American is that you don’t have to
worry about history because you have
no memory of it. Our national motto
should be: “A mis-
take worth making is
worth repeating.”
The other ques-
tion surrounding this
issue is: Will a raid
do any good … that
is, teach Assad a les-
son?
Probably not. Assad
won’t strike himself
on the forehead and
say “What a fool I’ve been. I’m going
to resign and spend the rest of my life
reading the Federalist Papers.”
Assad is a nasty piece of work. I
doubt that a limited strike such as this
one looks to be will have much effect.
So why do it?
There’s that red-line thing, I suppose,
but somehow “You cross that line and
I’m going to tell Congress” lacks some-
thing as a threat. Not that I’m against
consulting Congress, if its members can
be located.
In any case, the last time bombing
worked out for us was Kosovo, but that
was a two-month campaign of intensive
bombing, supported by our allies.
Our allies are hiding behind sand
dunes this time.
I predict it will all turn out badly. I’ve
been predicting that on the front end of
every single development in the Middle
East for the past 20 years and I have yet
to be wrong.
OtherWords columnist Donald Kaul
lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
September 6, 2013
Today is the 249th day of 2013
and the 78th day of summer.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1522,
Ferdinand Magellan’s ship,
Victoria, docked in Sanlucar,
Spain, completing the first global
circumnavigation. Magellan him-
self died en route.
In 1901, President William
McKinley was shot by anarchist
Leon Czolgosz. He died eight
days later.
In 1972, nine members of the
Israeli Olympic team, taken hos-
tage in Munich by Palestinian ter-
rorists the day before, were killed
during a failed rescue attempt.
In 1997, funeral services were
held in London for Diana, Princess
of Wales.
TODAY’S FACT: More than 2.5
billion people worldwide were
estimated to have watched at
least part of Princess Diana’s
funeral services on television in
1997.
DECATUR DAILY DEMOCRAT
VOL. CXI, NO. 212, Fri., Sept. 6, 2013
The Decatur Daily Democrat (USPS 150-780) is pub-
lished daily except Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day
and Christmas Day by: HORIZON PUBLISHING CO. OF
INDIANA, 141. S. Second St., Decatur, IN 46733.
Periodicals postage paid at Decatur, IN. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to the Decatur Daily
Democrat,141 S. 2nd St., Decatur, IN 46733.
Pence, Ritz must work together
Indiana Gov. Mike Pence’s creation of a
new state jobs agency left Superintendent
of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz complain-
ing she wasn’t consulted, even though
education is a vital aspect of the new
agency’s mission.
In fact, education is even part of the
agency’s name — the Center for Education
and Career Innovation.
Pence has spoken often of aligning
career and workforce training efforts, so
his involvement in creating this new agency
should not have come as a surprise, but it
definitely should not have surprised Ritz.
Ritz’s spokesman, Daniel Altman, spoke
volumes about the relationship between
Ritz and Pence.
‘‘Unfortunately, Superintendent Ritz
learned about the creation of this new
agency through news reports rather than
from Gov. Pence,’’ Altman said.
There are political considerations that
cannot be ignored. Pence is a Republican,
while Ritz is a Democrat.
It could easily be said the governor out-
ranks the superintendent of public instruc-
tion, but both were elected by the voters,
and if you’re looking to see whose mandate
is stronger, Ritz received more votes than
Pence.
‘‘The ultimate responsibility for improv-
ing our education and workforce training
system rests with our state’s chief execu-
tive,’’ said Kevin Brinegar, president of the
Indiana Chamber of Commerce.
Strictly speaking, however, education is
Ritz’s bailiwick. But that shouldn’t get in the
way of creating good public policy.
If there’s an education component, as
there clearly is with this new agency cre-
ated to oversee other state jobs agencies’
efforts, Ritz should be involved from the
start.
But that wasn’t the case with this new
agency. Now what?
The relationship between Pence and
Ritz is clearly strained, but that’s nothing a
good beer summit can’t fix.
Pence now should extend an olive
branch to Ritz and ask for her involvement
in this new agency.
Both Ritz and Pence see the need to
better align career and workforce training
efforts with the K-12 curriculum as is being
done in Northwest Indiana with the Ready
NWI project.
With stagnant personal income levels —
LaPorte County paychecks are at the 1985
national average, and Lake County are at
the 1995 level — and a state unemploy-
ment rate a full percentage point higher
than the national average, the task of
improving Indiana’s economy is urgent.
Here’s a chance for Pence and Ritz — a
Republican and a Democrat — to show
Hoosiers they can set politics aside and
work together to bring real change for
Indiana.
The Times, Munster
The nice thing about being
an American is that you
don’t have to worry about
history because you have
no memory of it. Our nation-
al motto should be: “A mis-
take worth making is worth
repeating.”
Mr. Putin’s
blinders
In an interview Tuesday
with the Associated Press
and Russian televi-
sion, Russian President
Vladimir Putin threw cold
water on the assertions
of the United States and
others that Syrian troops
used chemical weapons in
the Aug. 21 attack that
killed 1,429 people near
Damascus. “If there is
evidence that chemical
weapons have been used,
and used specifically by
the regular army, this evi-
dence should be submit-
ted to the U.N. Security
Council,” he said. “And it
ought to be convincing.
It shouldn’t be based on
some rumors and infor-
mation obtained by intel-
ligence agencies through
some kind of eavesdrop-
ping...”
“Ludicrous,” Mr. Putin
said of the possibility that
Syrian troops carried out
the attack.
Mr. Putin has been a
stalwart backer of Syrian
President Bashar al-Assad
in the civil war, but that
does not give him license to
ignore the facts and gloss
over inconvenient truths.
Syria’s chemical weapons
stockpile had its origins
in Cold War deals with the
Soviet Union, a patron of
the Syrian army, including
transfers of aerial bombs
that could be filled with
sarin and Scud missiles
armed with warheads that
could carry agents such
as VX nerve gas.
If Mr. Putin doubts
whether chemical weap-
ons were used by the
Syrian army, perhaps he
could ask his former col-
leagues at the Federal
Security Service to dig into
their archives and those
of the Soviet KGB, where
Mr. Putin also served. He
might want to see the dos-
sier on retired Lt. Gen.
Anatoly Kuntsevich, who
in the last decade of the
Cold War directed a secret
Soviet chemical weapons
testing facility.
Gen. Kuntsevich was
awarded the Lenin Prize
for his work on a new
binary chemical weapon.
In early 1992, after the
Soviet collapse, Russian
President Boris Yeltsin
named him to head a
commission to oversee the
demilitarization of chemi-
cal and biological weap-
ons. But only two years
later, Mr. Yeltsin fired him
for “one-time gross vio-
lation of work responsi-
bilities.” Russian officials
later disclosed that Gen.
Kuntsevich was investi-
gated for helping arrange
a delivery of about 1,700
pounds of nerve-gas pre-
cursor agents to Syria. He
was never prosecuted in
Russia, but in November
1995, the United States
imposed sanctions on Gen.
Kuntsevich for “knowingly
and materially assisting”
Syria’s chemical weapons
program. The general died
in 2002 on a flight from
Syria to Russia.
Mr. Putin cannot be
held to account for every
military contract of the
Soviet Union nor for the
dirty deals of a rogue gen-
eral in the 1990s. Over the
past two decades, Russia
has cooperated with the
United States in destroy-
ing chemical weapons
stockpiles. But the sarin
gas attack near Damascus
should not be so glibly
dismissed as “ludicrous”
by a Russian president.
Mr. Putin should throw
Russia’s support behind
an investigation of this
atrocity. A horrible crime
was committed on a killing
wind in Syria, and given
Russia’s past, Mr. Putin
cannot simply look the
other way.
Washington Post
Decatur Daily Democrat
Friday, September 6, 2013 • Page 5A
Community
Birth
Announcements
Community Calendar
Sense & Sensitivity
by Harriette Cole
It’s Not Too Late For Friend To Reach Out
DEAR HARRIETTE:
A good friend had a hip
replaced this summer.
She sent an email ask-
ing for her friends to buy
groceries and otherwise
help out while she recu-
perated. She included me
on the outreach list, and
I responded right away.
But I did not follow up to
ensure that I had duties to
fulfill. Now, several weeks
have passed, and I have
done nothing. I got busy
with my family and work,
and I honestly forgot. I am
so embarrassed. I want to
reach out and see if she
needs anything now, but
I feel like such a loser for
not calling earlier. What
should I do? -- Late to the
Party, Syracuse, N.Y.
DEAR LATE TO THE
PARTY: It is never too
late to express your love
to one in need. By all
means call your friend and
check in to see how she
is doing. Ask her about
her recuperation. Be a
good listener. Chances
are she will be happy to
hear from you and will be
more than willing to give
you an update.
Ask her if she needs
anything now, if there is
anything that you can
do to support her during
this leg of her healing
process. Promise to call
her again soon, and then
remember to do so.
Resist the temptation
to make the conversation
about yourself by going
through a litany of rea-
sons why you have not
called previously. Keep
the focus on her and the
moment. What can you
do now to be of help?
D E A R
HARRIETTE: I was told
that I am prediabetic. My
doctor wants me to go to
a nutritionist and try to get
a handle on my health.
I am so upset. Diabetes
runs in my family, and I
have worked hard not to
get it -- until a couple of
years ago, that is. I was
depressed about a lot
of things, and I stopped
exercising and started
eating and drinking the
wrong things. Now I am
paying the price. I don’t
want to tell my family. I
can already hear “I told
you so.” Honestly, I don’t
want to do anything. I just
want it to go away. That’s
stupid, I know. But I feel
stuck. How can I snap out
of it? -- On the Verge, Salt
Lake City, Iowa
DEAR ON THE
VERGE: Take one step
at a time. If your doc-
tor gave you a number
for a nutritionist, call and
schedule an appoint-
ment. A professional can
be enormously helpful in
getting you on the right
track toward a healthier
life. Pay close attention
to the recommendations
you are given, and follow
them to the best of your
ability.
You need to decide
that you deserve to be
healthy. This includes
acknowledging that it is
possible NOT to walk in
your family’s footsteps if
you take the proper mea-
sures now. It is likely that
you will be given an eat-
ing and exercise regimen
to follow. Give yourself the
gift of doing these things,
one day at a time. Each
day that you choose your
health, you are choos-
ing life. Get psychological
support if you can to help
lift any lingering negative
thoughts. You can do it!
FRIDAY, September 6:
Immanuel House, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 8545 N 500 E,
Decatur.
Operation Help food pantry for Decatur and
Monroe residents, 1-3 p.m., Adams County Service
Complex. Bring your own bags.
A.A. Happy Hour Discussion Group (closed), 5-6
p.m., Decatur Church of God.
Reformers Unanimous Addiction Recovery
Program, 7-9 p.m., Grace Fellowship Church.
Free community scrapbook night, 6-11 p.m.,
Common Ground Church.
SATURDAY, September 7:
A.A., 7 p.m., (open speaker/discussion) Cross
United Church, Berne.
MONDAY, September 9:
Decatur Church of Christ food pantry, 700 E.
Monroe St., Decatur. 10 a.m.-noon.
CAPS support group, 6:30 p.m., C & C Bible
Fellowship, Berne.
A.A. Big Book discussion, 7 p.m., Decatur Church
of God.
TUESDAY, September 10:
Bread of Life food pantry, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Monroe
United Methodist Church.
Goree
B e t t y
Rodriquez and
Joshua Goree
are the par-
ents of a 20
1/2”, 9 pound,
8-ounce daugh-
ter, Janiece
Debra Goree,
born August 14,
2013.
Grandparents
are Patricia
Rodriguez of
Decatur; and
Debra and Quinton Goree of Haven, Mich.
Great-grandparents are David and Besse Barner.
Janiece joins siblings Shawna, Alayiah, Jacari,
and Cleveland.
Hilty
Emanuel E. S. and Miriam (Shetler) Hilty are the
parents of a 21” long, 6-pound, 14-ounce son, Elmer
E. M., born August 14, 2013.
Grandparents are Jacob M. and Frieda M.
(Kauffman) Shetler of Monroe; and Elmer K. and
Salome (Graber) Hilty of Geneva.
Elmer joins brothers, Emanuel (6) and Jacob (3).
Hirschy
Troy and Nicole (Shaffer) Hirschy are the parents
of a 19” long, 6 pound, 7-ounce daughter, Isabella Jo
Hirschy, born July 20, 2013.
Grandparents are Scott and Laurie Hutzler of
Portland, Steve Shaffer of Celina, and Randy and
Nancy Hirschy of Monroe.
Great-Grandparentees are Ned and Paula Hileman
of Rockford, Ohio and Norma Shaffer of Celina and
Dee and Shirley Wolfe of Decatur.
Schwartz
John R. and Martha A. M. Schwartz are the par-
ents of a 20” long, 7-pound 4-ounce son, Walter M.,
born August 1, 2013.
Grandparents are Mose K. and Mandy M. Schwartz;
and Simon E. J. and Ruth E. Schwartz.
Teeple
Dustin and Emily Teeple of Santan Valley, Ariz.,
are the parents of a 20.75” long, 8-pound, 1-ounce
son, Patrick James, born August 27, 2013.
Grandparents are Patrick and Jean Teeple of
Decatur; and Gina Potter of New Haven indiana.
Great-grandparents are Shelley Roe of Monroe;
Jim and Diane Byer of Geneva; and Donald “Pat”
Teeple of Decatur.
Great-great-grandparents are William “Bill”
Schumm of Willshire, Ohio.
Wells
J e r e m y
Wells and
Brandi Busch
of Bridgeport,
Ill. are the par-
ents of a 17.5”
long, 4-pound,
1 4 - o u n c e
daughter, Lillee
Grace Wells
born July 16,
2013.
Grandparents
are Terri Rauch
of Decatur; Sam
Anderson of Ky.;
and Steven and Laura Wells of Bridgeport.
Great-grandparents are Terry and Darlene Black
of Decatur; James Wells of Robinson, Ill.; and Lynette
Wells of Bridgeport.
Lilee joins siblings Nikali, Braxton, and Braylie
Wells.
Janiece Debra Goree
Lillee Grace Wells
CLEANING UP FOR VETS ... Neil Schroeder of
Andy’s Car Wash presents Families of Veterans
(FOV) in Need of Adams County chairperson Deb
Lambert with a donation check for $234 that was
collected August 16-18. Andy’s donated $1 to FOV
for every car washed over that weekend. (Photo
provided)
American Legion
Auxiliary meets
The first meeting of
the fiscal year for the
American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 43, Decatur, was
held recently. The eve-
ning began with a carry-
in dinner at 6 p.m., with
Emily McClelland and
Alyssa Strickler – who
were sponsored by the
auxiliary while serving as
delegates at Hoosier Girls
State – and their fami-
lies as guests. Auxiliary
president Jeanette
Bultemeier welcomed
all in attendance, and
Phyllis Hindenlang led
the group in prayer prior
to the meal.
Following the meal,
the delegates shared
their experiences while
serving as delegates and
answered questions posed
by the group. Delegates
McClelland and Strickler
attend Bellmont High
School, while delegate
Jennie Schultz – who
was unable to attend the
meeting – attends Adams
Central High School.
Following the discus-
sion with the delegates,
Bultemeier presided over
the business meeting.
Fundraising ideas were
discussed, and in the
absence of the chaplain
the report was given by
Phyllis Hindenlang. The
report for the months
of June through August
included get well wish-
es to Phyllis Zwick,
Norma Stuckey, Judy
Plum, Irene Grote, and
Esther Briede-Kleine; a
memorial was given in
memory of Lenore Lytle-
Holtsberry and a thank
you was received by her
son, Steve, and his wife,
Pat.
The meeting was
closed with prayer. The
next meeting will be
Monday, October 6, at 7
p.m.
First Bank of Berne recently made a $1,500 dona-
tion to the Compassionate Ministries Network Inc.
in Berne. Shown above is Elizabeth Fruechte (right),
mortgage specialist with the bank, as she presents
the check to Rev. Don Sauls and wife Sandy, direc-
tors of Compassionate Ministries Network. (Photo
provided)
Geneva Library offers
after school programs
After school programs
resume this month at
the Adams Public Library
in Geneva, with activi-
ties on Tuesdays and
Wednesdays. On the
first and third Tuesdays,
the library hosts Lego
Club after school. Every
Wednesday afternoon is a
homework / study group.
Children in grades 1-5
are invited to attend the
afternoon sessions and
snacks are provided.
For more information,
call the library at 368-
7270.
AdAms County
seniors hold meeting
The Adams County
Senior Citizens met
recently at the Riverside
Center for its regular
monthly meeting, with
president Jean Wilder
welcoming 71 mem-
bers and guests. Bruce
Reidenbach led the
group in the Pledge of
Allegiance and reverend
James Compton led a
prayer.
Doug Milligan pro-
vided entertainment with
Sounds of the Trombone,
performing tunes written
by legends Irving Berlin,
Geo and Ira Gershwin,
and Cole Porter. Milligan
closed with Dixieland
songs and the hymn
Amazing Grace.
Guests who joined the
group were Rosie Kaplan
and Mary Everidge. Get-
well cards were signed
for Rex Hinsky, Pam
Longsworth, and Evelyn
Hart. Those celebrating
birthdays this month
include Joy Luker, Dixie
Landis, Dorothy Moser,
Earlene Moser, John
Bergman, Janet McCroy,
and Pauline Edwards.
Celebrating August birth-
days were Nancy Yoder
and Don Hoffman.
September wedding
anniversaries included
Mike and Barb Bodle;
and Lee and Pauline
Edwards, both celebrat-
ing 60 years. Five addi-
tional couples in the club
have also been married
60 years.
John Brodbeck will
provide musical enter-
tainment next month.
Seniors 55 and older
are invited to join this
group that meets the first
Tuesday of each month
at 11:15 a.m. for a carry-
in meal and entertain-
ment.
Council on Aging
sponsors bingo, called
and managed by Jim
and Joan Heimann,
each month following the
meeting.
Food Certification class
offered by Purdue Co-op
The Purdue
Cooperative Extension
Service of Wells County
will be offering a Retail
Food Certification class
on October 2 and 9. This
class is for food handlers
who need to obtain a
Retail Food Certificate.
The 16-hour class will
take place from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. both days.
The exam will be
administered at 3 p.m.
on October 9th. Photo
identification with signa-
ture is required to take
the exam. Cost of the
class and exam is $150,
while cost to take the
exam only is $50. Pre-
registration is required
by September 25 in order
to receive a textbook.
English and Spanish
exams are available at
registration.
To register go to www.
indianarestaurants.org
and click on ServSafe
Food Handler Training
on the right side. The
class will be held at the
Wells County Community
Center, 1240 4-H Park
Road, Bluffton. For
more information con-
tact Extension Educator
Molly Hoag at (260) 824-
6412.
Saturday Night at the Village
Swiss Village retire-
ment community in Berne
will host a showing of
the movie “Driving Miss
Daisy” at 7 p.m. on Sept.
14 as part of its Saturday
Night at the Village pro-
gram.
The movie is based
on the Pulitzer Prize-
winning play by Alfred
Uhry and stars Morgan
Freeman, Jessica Tandy,
Dan Aykroyd and Patti
LuPone. The film covers
the 25-year relationship
between and wealthy,
strong-willed Southern
matron and her equally
indomitable chauffer.
Saturday Night at the
Village offers free family
entertainment is provided
on the second Saturday
of every month from 7-8
p.m. For more informa-
tion, call 589-3173 or visit
www.swissvillage.org.
SASC provides
weekly activities
The South Adams
Senior Center provides
weekly activities for area
seniors.
Activities and activity
photos are available on
the South Adams Senior
Center Facebook page.
Rides to daytime
events are available
through the Council on
Aging, with at least a one
week notice and a mini-
mum donation appreci-
ated.
Call (260) 589-8877
for more information or
visit www.saseniorcen-
ter.com.
Kaye and Tony
Mellencamp will be at the
Senior Center at 7 p.m.
on Tuesday, September
10, to share their jour-
ney through Kaye’s sud-
den illness and ongoing
recovery. Tony’s book,
“K,” will be available for
purchase. This program
is open to the public.
Healthy and Easy
Cooking, sponsored by
Swiss Village and led by
instructors Deb Mishler
and Nancy Manuel, will
be held at 10 a.m. on
Friday, September 13, at
the Senior Center.
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 6A • Friday, September 6, 2013
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Decatur
Lighthouse
8727 N. U.S. Hwy. 27
(260) 728-4091
Pastor William Royse
Sunday:
10 a.m. Worship
6 p.m. Sunday
evening service
Wednesday:
6:30 p.m. Bible study,
all ages.
Saturday:
6 p.m. Warfare Prayer
Living Word Temple
230 W. Madison St.
Decatur, IN 46733
(north across from
the courthouse)
(260) 724-8454
templo230@yahoo.com
Pastor: Brother Dan
Sunday:
Worship, 10 a.m.
Sunday School
(all ages), 10:35 a.m.
Prayer, 6 p.m.
Wednesday:
Bible Study, 7 p.m.
BAPTIST
Decatur Baptist
Church
8070 N. Piqua Rd.
(260) 724-7667
www.decaturbaptistindi-
ana.com
dbcministry@aol.com
Pastor Andrew B. Lyons
Sunday:
9 a.m. Sunday School &
Bible Study
10 a.m. Morning Service
6 p.m. Evening Service
Wednesday:
7 p.m. Bible Study &
Children's Bible Club
CHURCH OF GOD
Decatur
Church of God
1129 Mercer Ave.,
Decatur, IN 46733
(260) 724-2580
www.decaturchurchofgod.
com
Dr. Robert J. Brink,
Senior Pastor
Jamie Conkling, Pastor of
Worship Arts
Sandra Hildebrand,
Pastor of Congregational
Life
Jerry Mitchel, Visitation Pastor
K.C. Graves, Pastor of
Student Ministries
Sunday:
Worship service with deaf
interpretation, 9 a.m.
G.I.G.ville, 10:15 a.m.
Sunday School, 10.15 a.m.
H.O.M.E. Groups, 6 p.m.
Wednesday:
Family Activities, 7 p.m.
LUTHERAN
St. Peter Evangelical
Lutheran Church
1033 E 1100 N
Decatur, IN 46733
Phone: (260) 724-7533
spl1845@adamswells.com
Rev. Martin K. Moehring
Fieldworker:
Steve Conradt and
Jonathan Durkopp
Sunday:
Divine Service, 9 a.m.
Sunday School &
Bible Class, 10:15 a.m.
Zion Lutheran
Church
1010 West Monroe St.,
Decatur,
(260) 724-7177
church@ziondecatur.com
Phil Phifer
Senior Pastor
Daniel Hensz
Director of Christian
Education
Christian School —
Preschool through Grade 8
Sunday:
Worship Service, 8 a.m.
Bible Study and Sunday
School, 9:15 a.m.
Worship Service, 10:30
a.m.
(Broadcast live on WZBD;
Also listen to sermon and
Bible class on
www.ziondecatur.com)
Youth Fellowship, 2:30-4 p.m.
4th Monday of Each Month:
Theology on Tap,
7 p.m. at Vinnie's
MISSIONARY
Cornerstone
Community Church
909 E. Monroe Street Ext.
and Piqua Road
(260) 724-7556 / 724-3678
secretary@decaturcorner
stone.com
Pastor Ken Hogg
Sunday:
Traditional Worship, 9 a.m.
Contemporary Worship
Service, 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School for
all ages, 10:30 a.m.
Thursday:
Celebration Station for
ages 4 yrs. through 5th
grade, 6:45-8 p.m.,
in the Activity Center
(Labor Day to
Memorial Day)
Hoagland Community
Church
P.O. Box 126,
11104 Hoagland Road
Hoagland, IN 46745
(260) 705-7455
Pastor Todd Buckmaster
Sunday:
Sunday School, 9 a.m.
Worship Service, 10 a.m.
NON-
DENOMINATIONAL
Decatur
Church of Christ
700 E Monroe St.
(260) 724-2034
Email:
decaturchurchofchrist@
mediacombb.net
Website: decaturcc.org
Minister: Steven Beckett
Sunday:
9 a.m. Bible Class
10 a.m. Worship Service
Wednesday:
TT (Teen Time), 6:30-7:30
p.m.
Adult Bible Study, 6:30 p.m.
DCC's Food Pantry is open
every Monday from 10 a.m.
- noon (summer hours –
fall hours TBA)
Damascus Road
Church
1040 S. 11th St.
P.O. Box 783
Decatur, IN 46733
Pastoral Contacts:
Kevin (260) 701-0438
Dennis (260) 517-9525
Sunday:
Bible Study, 9 a.m.
Sunday Worship, 10 a.m.
Thursday
Adult & Youth Bible Study,
7 p.m.
Child care offered at all ser-
vices
The Clothes Closet:
1040 S. 11th St., Decatur
(260) 223-9457
(260) 223-5727
(260) 223-6057
Open M-W-F: 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Closed September for reno-
vations
(Independent)
New Beginnings
Family Center
Corner of 10th St.
and Dayton Avenue
(Next to Northwest School)
(260) 728-9000
www.nbfcfamily.com
Pastor Geoff Smith
Sunday:
Celebration Service 10 a.m.
Wednesday:
"Souled Out" Youth, 6:30
p.m.
Thursday:
Cul-ti-vate Bible Study, 7
p.m.
Salem Community
Church
2140 S. Salem Road
(2 miles south of St. Rd. 124)
Pastor Jim Compton.
"A little country church
with a big heart"
Sunday:
Morning Service, 9 a.m.
Sunday School, 10:15 a.m.
ROMAN CATHOLIC
St. Mary of the
Assumption
Catholic Church
414 W. Madison St.
Decatur, IN 46733-1615
(260) 724-9159
www.stmarysdecatur.org
Pastor:
Fr. David W. Voors
Associate Pastor: Fr. Patrick
Joseph
Religious Education:
Deacon Jerry Kohrman
Weekend Masses:
Sat., 4 p.m.
Sun., 7, 8:30, 11 a.m.
Confessions (Reconciliation):
Mon., 5:30 p.m.
Wed., 8:30 p.m.
Sat., 5:15 p.m.
Daily Mass:
M-Tu-Wed, 8:15 a.m. & 6
p.m.
Th, 7 & 8:15 a.m.
Fri., 1:30 p.m. at Woodcrest
Sat. 8:15 a.m.
Eucharistic Adoration:
M-Tu-W, 3-4 p.m.
Thurs., 8:45-9:45 a.m. & 3-8
p.m.
UNITED BRETHREN
Mt. Zion Church of
the United Brethren
in Christ Inc.
4515 North State Rd. 101
Decatur, IN 46733
Dr. Russel Wagner, Pastor
Phone 592-7010
Cell (260) 388-1130
Sunday:
Worship, 9 a.m.
Sunday School 10:15 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer meeting &
Bible study 7 p.m.
UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Salem United
Church of Christ
(Magley)
7494 N 600 W,
Decatur, IN 46733
(260) 547-4565.
Pastor: Rev. David Butz
Sunday:
Sunday School for all ages, 9
a.m.
Worship in Sanctuary, 10
a.m.
UNITED
METHODIST
Union Chapel
United Methodist
Church
2999 E 700 N
Decatur, Ind. 46733
(260) 724-2084
unionchapel260@
(Union Chapel United
Methodist Church Continued)
embarqmail.com
Pastor: Ed Karges
Sunday:
Sunday School, 9 a.m.
Worship, 10 a.m.
Youth, 6-8 p.m.
Wednesday:
Choir, 6 p.m.
Area Church Directory
522 S. 13th St. 724-9131
24 Hours: 1-800-589-IDEAL
Adam T. Miller
Burry, Herman, Miller & Brown. P.C.
113 North Second Street
Decatur, Indiana 46733
260-724-2154
BAUMAN
UPHOLSTERY, Inc.
7941 N. 200 W.
We Specialize in
Furniture & Auto
Tim Bauman 724-3767
HOOSIER
BLUE FLAME
724-3716 • 1-80-875-3716
1024 E. US Hwy. 224 • Decatur, IN
DAVE MYERS'
Town & Country
Auctioneers/Realtors
Before You Buy or Sell...See Us!
We offer Professional
Sales and Service
FARM-HOME-ACREAGES-COMMERCIAL
260-724-8899
P.O. Box 187
Monroe, IN 46772
692-6171
• Firestone • Bridgestone •
• Michelin • Falls •
• Wheels •
NATIONAL OIL & GAS, Inc.
MARKETERS OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
Delivery to Home,
Farms & Businesses
Mark Lehmann
589-8186
Mike Cook
724-4470
Ron Collins
437-0811
David L. Collier
Columbus Life
Insurance Company
CLU, ChFC
Phone 724-3591
RESTAURANT
STEVE RICH
728-2933
For Insurance Call..
230 S. Second Street • Decatur
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
State Farm Insurance
Companies
Home Office Bloomington, Illinois
RESTAURANT
McKEAN’S
903 N. 13th St. • Decatur
724-3457
Auto Sales
Gene McKean, owner
Adam T. Miller
Burry, Herman, Miller & Brown. P.C.
113 North Second Street
Decatur, Indiana 46733
260-724-2154
HOOSIER
BLUE FLAME
724-3716 • 1-80-875-3716
1024 E. US Hwy. 224 • Decatur, IN
STEVE RICH
728-2933
For Insurance Call..
230 S. Second Street • Decatur
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
State Farm Insurance
Companies
Home Office Bloomington, Illinois
522 S. 13th St. 724-9131
24 Hours: 1-800-589-IDEAL
Military Families and the
Challenges of a Life of Service
The life of a military
family is one of blessings and
challenges. Those who serve
our nation in the profession
of arms serve many masters
and play a balancing game of
taking care of the demands of
home while constantly prepar-
ing for the eventuality of war.
Those who have not experi-
enced the nomadic life of a
service member will have diff-
culty understanding the many
demands of a lifestyle made up
of numerous moves and long-
term separations.
When a military family
executes orders for a perma-
nent change of duty station it
is common that the family unit
will remain at a duty station
for three years. The frequency
of moves can often prove to
be diffcult for everyone in the
family. Friendships, neigh-
borhoods, schools, church
communities all change when
a military family executes a
set of orders. Some grow ac-
customed to this reality while
many struggle with having
to “start over” in a new and
maybe strange location.
Most American citi-
zens have a family member, a
friend, or business associate
that has been deployed. For
family members of a loved
one deployed this is a stress-
ful time of uncertainty. The
stress of family separation,
changing family roles, and the
danger of engaging an enemy
is at times unbearable. The
families of deployed service
members respond in many
various ways. Some people
may choose to fll the days
with healthy choices such as
church, further education, or
community activities. How-
ever, some may respond to
these stressful times in less
healthy or productive ways by
using alcohol, associating with
inappropriate individuals,
child neglect or abuse, or even
infdelity.
Some will respond to
those who reach out in genu-
ine concern free of any judg-
mental opinions. I believe if
we follow the example of Jesus
and the woman at the well, we
will fnd common ground for
reaching those who wear the
cloth of our country.
I would like to thank
my brother Retired Lt. Com-
mander Michael S. Hogg who
served as a Navy Chaplain
and was deployed in Iraq, Ku-
wait, Japan, and many other
places for his insight into this
article.
Questions or comments
may be directed to Rev. Ken-
neth Hogg at 260-724-7556.
– Sponsored by the Decatur
Ministerial Association – Wit-
nessing to our common con-
nection in Christ.
Military Families and the
Challenges of a Life of Service
Decatur Daily Democrat
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Hearts! Selena &
Steve
1-866-877-4737
www.selenaandste-
veadopt.com
Thank you for the
gift of life. We will
delight in loving
your newborn in
our happy, secure
home. Expenses
paid. Kelly and Mi-
chael
888-930-5815
Automotives
For Sale
2000 Pontiac
Bonneville SSEI
supercharged,
154,000mi., fair
condition, very
good tires, moon-
roof, keyless entry,
everything works
$4,000 obo
260-639-3278
GUARANTEED
TOP DOLLAR
FOR JUNK CARS,
TRUCKS & VANS
CALL JACK @
260-466-8689
Boats/ Marina
For Sale
Boat for sale: 1986
Nautique & trailer
(25th edition 2001)
excellent condition
260-849-1425
Apartments
For Rent
Country Brook
Apartments offer
spacious 1 & 2
bedroom apartment
homes with con-
venient laundry fa-
cilities. Rent spe-
cial and Rental As-
sistance available!
Stop in at 522
S.13th St. in Deca-
tur or call (260)
724-4616/ TDD
1-800-743-3333.
“This institution is
an equal opportu-
nity provider and
employer.”
FOR RENT 2-bed-
room apartment
w/appliances. All
Carpeted, Nice Lo-
cation. Available
now. References &
Deposit required.
$355.00 month.
PRESTIGE
REALTY
260-724-7023.
Apartments
For Rent
NEW RENT SPE-
CIAL! 17th Street
apartments now
available. Spa-
cious 2 bedroom
apartment homes
with 1 bath and all
appliances includ-
ing a full size
washer & dryer,
many recently re-
modeled, for just
$385/month for the
ground level and
$345/balcony. De-
posit special of
$250. Call (260)
724-4616 or stop
by 522 S. 13th St.
for more informa-
tion. EHO
Property
For Sale
235 High Street,
Geneva, IN
Oh-my-goodness,
this inviting starter
home is a real must
see! This charmer’s
inviting atmosphere
includes handsome
custom woodwork
on main level.
Newer carpeting,
oak kitchen, red
oak hardwood
flooring and a
lovely color palate
all tastefully
blended together.
Has both a living
room AND a family
room. Gas forced
air works in con-
junction with elec-
tric heat pump cre-
ating efficient heat-
ing. Newer roof and
newer windows.
Overall very
well-maintained
home with bright
curb-side appeal.
Give me a call to-
day!
Tina A Marbach
"Fast Results You
Want!"
Cell: (260)
849-1029
Offc.: (260)
589-8474
Century 21 Ad-
vance Realty
c21tina@gmail.co
m
Household/
Furniture
For Sale
Brand NEW in
plastic!
QUEEN
PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET
Can deliver, $125.
(260) 493-0805
Pets/Supplies
Storage
PUPPIES--Chihua-
huas reduced!
Happy Havanese,
Sweet Shihpoos,
Macho Morkies,
Merry Malti-poms.
All ready adorable!
Garwick’s The Pet
People:
419-795-5711 gar-
wicksthepetpeople.
com
Garage Sale
247 N 6th St
Saturday 8-3
Recliner, end ta-
bles, dog kennel,
floor lamp, table &
chairs, night
stands, dresser,
sofa, love seat
4 family barn sale
7555 N St Rd 101
Fri & Sat 8-5
Clothes, books,
Christmas items,
electronics, Har-
vest table, Hoosier
cabinet, aluminum
boat, something for
everyone.
6015 E 100 S
Decatur
Fri-Sat 8am-6pm
Two family’s, pellet
rifle, bb gun, 17in
truck tires, pots &
pans, dishes, bed-
ding, toys, lots
more
7748 N Piqua Rd
Sat. Sept. 7th 9-4
Christmas in Sep-
tember, never too
soon to shop.
Lots of decor, table
things, pillows, can-
dles, most items
still in boxes, large
Santa collection
and much more,
also lots of gift
items for every oc-
casion
Garage Sale
8169 NW Win-
chester
September 7th 8-4
Lions Club mem-
bers garage/barn
sale. All proceeds
go to Lions Club
charities. 7 families,
kitchenware, sport-
ing goods, hard-
ware, tools, toys
etc.
947 E 900 N
Sept 6 & 7 8-3
Infant-women’s-
men’s clothing,
prom dresses,
shoes, yarn, books,
pictures, baskets,
dolls, Christmas
decorations, ab
lounger/elliptical,
entertainment cen-
ter, air conditioner,
tools, tires, car ste-
reos, shop vac,
knickknacks
General
Help Wanted
1st shift Swiss
Lathe opening
Quake Manufactur-
ing is looking for the
right person to pro-
gram/setup our Swiss
Lathes. Must be able
to program and setup
Star & Citizen
entry-level machines
with no assistance.
Great compensation,
Holidays, vacation,
insurance, 401K.
Email, fax or mail
resume.
paulquake@
quakemfg.com
Fax: 260-432-7868
Heavy Equipment
Operator Training!
Bulldozers, Back-
hoes, Excavators.
3 Weeks Hands On
Program. Local Job
Placement Assis-
tance. National
Certifications. GI
Bill Benefits Eligi-
ble.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
JOB FAIR
Open Interviews
September 10th
2pm-4pm
Snider Tire Inc.
1400 W. Wiley
Ave.
Bluffton, IN
1st/2nd/3rd
shifts
$10.00+ hr.
Heavy Industrial
Clean Criminal
Background
DO NOT CON-
TACT SNIDER
TIRE DIRECTLY
Call Sommer for
questions @
260-724-4810
opt. 1
Wanted: Part time
ISO 9001 internal
auditor. Must have
knowledge of Stan-
dard and have
auditing experi-
ence. Able to work
in Adams, Wells
and Jay counties.
Please send re-
sume to:
Decatur Daily
Democrat
141 S. 2nd St
Decatur, IN 46733
File #87
R&M Landscaping
is looking for fore-
man, operators and
laborers for land-
scaping work, must
be able to travel
out of town 1 or 2
weeks at a time,
valid drivers li-
cense, experience
a plus but not nec-
essary.
Please call
724-7049 to set up
appointment.
General
Help Wanted
Office Support As-
sociate
P/T Administrative
Office Support per-
son for Monroe IN
location. Should
have basic under-
standing/interest in
energy/agriculture.
Possess excellent
customer service
skills, process
phone orders, input
orders, basic book-
keeping, computer
skills, communicate
with team mem-
bers, and be de-
tailed.
Work M-F, 8 a.m. -
noon. Competitive
pay. High school
diploma/GED, valid
driver’s license, a
good driving re-
cord, clear criminal
background check
and ability to pass
a pre-employment
drug screen.
Application at
www.harvestland-
coop.com Career
page. Send appli-
cation to HR Man-
ager, Harvest Land
Co-op,
career@har-
vestlandcoop.com,
765-962-1527,
P.O. Box 516,
Richmond IN
47375.
Open immediately
Part time nightly
cleaning positions
available in Deca-
tur. Must be reli-
able pay attention
to detail and have
own transportation.
Text or call
260-403-7676. Ask
for Bob.
Sports Correspon-
dent wanted for
high school football
season. Some writ-
ing experience nec-
essary. Paid per
game. If interested
please email:
sports@decatur-
dailydemocrat.com
The Brickhouse on
Jackson in Monroe
is now accepting
applications for PT
weekend and eve-
ning waitstaff and
kitchen position.
Apply in person @
134 E Jackson
Monroe
Drivers
Help Wanted
ATTENTION RE-
GIONAL & DEDI-
CATED DRIVERS!
Averitt offers Excel-
lent Benefits and
Hometime. CDL-A
req. 888-362-8608.
Recent Grads w/a
CDL-A 1-5/wks
Paid Training. Ap-
ply online at Aver-
ittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer
CDL TRAINEES
NEEDED! *No Ex-
perience Required.
*Learn To Drive For
US Express. *Train
& Be Based Lo-
cally! *Earn $800
Per Week After
Sponsored Training
Program.
1-800-882-7364
Drivers- CDL-A
Train and work for
us! Professional,
focused CDL train-
ing available.
Choose Company
Driver, Owner Op-
erator, Lease Op-
erator or Lease
Trainer. (877)
369-7203
www.CentralTruck-
DrivingJobs.com
Drivers
Help Wanted
CLASS A CDL
DRIVERS--GEI-
Corp. Trucking hir-
ing Regional and
OTR Drivers with 2
years exp., good
MVR, no accidents,
newer equipment,
terminal in Markle
area. We have
benefits, vacation
pay and home on
the weekends! Pay
is based on per-
formance, so
please call
260-758-2068. (A)
Driver-must have
valid CDL license,
some overnights,
delivering and help-
ing set houses at
job site. Contact
Dwight or Greta at
All American
Homes
Drivers-CDL-A
SOLO & TEAM
DRIVERS
NEEDED! Top Pay
& Full Benefits.
Even MORE Pay
for Hazmat! New
Trucks Arriving
Daily! CDL Grads
Welcome!
800-942-2104
www.TotalMS.com
Drivers: Up to
$5,000 Sign-on Bo-
nus. Hiring Solo
and Teams. Excel-
lent Home Time &
Pay! BCBS Bene-
fits. Join Super
Service!
888-794-3694
DriveForSu-
perService.com
Get more home
time on Transport
American’s re-
gional runs. Great
miles, equipment +
extras. Enjoy
Transport Ameri-
ca’s great driver ex-
perience! Tadriv-
ers.com or
866-204-0648
Help Wanted
Driver/Owner Op-
erator
SAME DAY
Bluffton, IN
Home Weekends
& Holidays
Through Terminal
Daily
Midwest-250 Mile
Radius
Dry Van
Commission
Based Pay
Class A CDL with
2yrs. Exp.
For more informa-
tion call
800-584-6068
Or apply @
3140 East State
Road 124
Bluffton, IN
MCT LOGISTICS--
Class A-CDL flat-
bed driver wanted.
Home weekends.
$1,000 week.
260-760-6095. (A)
“Partners in Excel-
lence” OTR Drivers
APU Equipped
Pre-Pass EZ-pass
passenger policy.
2012 & Newer
equipment. 100%
NO touch. Butler
Transport
1-800-528-7825
Transfer Drivers:
Need CDL A or B
Contract Drivers, to
relocate vehicles to
and from various
locations through-
out US- No forced
dispatch:
1-800-501-3783
Services
DirecTV- Over 140
channels only
$29.99 a month.
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2013 NFL Sunday
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888-541-7967
Financial
Services
BANKRUPTCY
$25.00 to start
Free Consultation,
Ft Wayne Office260-
424-0954,Decatur
Office260-728-9997.
CH. 13 NO
MONEYDOWN.
filing fee not
included.Payment
Plans Available. Sat.
& Evening Appoint-
ments.
Fire proof safe on
wheels
length 17” width
14” height 21 1/2”
$75.00 obo
260-517-9207
1 & ONLY PLACE
TO CALL-- to get
rid of that junk car,
truck or van! Cash
on the spot! Free
towing. Call
260-745-8888. (A)
Drivers
Help Wanted
Miscellaneous
1st SHIFT MAINTENANCE
6:00 am to 2:30 pm · Monday ~ Friday
This position is responsib|e for the maintenance and repair of p|ant
equipment and systems using various e|ectrica| ski||s inc|uding.
3 phase 240/480V and sing|e 110/220V, e|ectrica| motors, re|ays,
motor starters, mechanica| ski||s, hydrau|ic and air systems.
Qua|ifed candidates wi|| have a minimum of one to three years
re|ated maintenance experience in a manufacturing faci|ity.
P|ease mai| resume with sa|ary requirements to:
Kennedy Manufacturing Co.
Attn: HR ·1260 lndustria| Drive, Van Wert, OH 45891
Apply in person, Monday - Friday, 8:30amto 4pm
or mail resume with salary requirements to:
COUPONS
CURRENT EVENTS
TECHNOLOGY
ENTERTAINMENT
COMICS
SPORTS
and more…
All
Rolled
Into
One!
Call today for current subscriptions specials!!!
Decatur Daily Democrat
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Subscribe to the Decatur Daily
Democrat and get all of the local
news you need.
THE DECATUR DAILY
DEMOCRAT
141 S. SeconJ St. º Decatur, IN º (260) 724-2121
Keep up with kids sports, school,
and other local activities with the
Decatur Daily Democrat!
Classifieds
Page 8A • Friday, September 6, 2013 Decatur Daily Democrat
ADVERTISEMENT FOR
BIDS
Notice is hereby given that
the Board of Public Works
and Safety of the City of De-
catur, Indiana, will receive
VHDOHG ELGV DW WKH RIÀFH RI
the Clerk-Treasurer of said
City until the hour of 4:00
P.M., local time, on the 17th
day of September 2013.
Bids will be opened and
publicly read aloud at 6:00
P.M. at City Hall, 225 West
Monroe Street, Decatur, In-
diana, for unit prices for the
following materials to be fur-
nished and delivered for the
year of 2014.
Approximately three-thou-
sand (3,000) tons of salt for
use in the operation of the
Zeolite Water Treatment
System, owned by the City
of Decatur. Bidders will be
UHTXLUHGWRTXRWHÀUPSULFHV
of the cost per ton of salt
FOB to the Water Treatment
Plants in Decatur on Monroe
and Winchester Streets by
dump truck. Delivery shall
be Monday through Friday,
8:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. and
the plant to which delivery
is to be made ascertained
at the Monroe Street Plant
(telephone 260-724-3658).
No covered dump truck
delivery may be made on
Saturdays or Sundays. Bids
for both rock salt and granu-
lated salt will be considered.
Also, approximately two-
hundred (200) tons of street
salt for the City of Decatur
Street Department.
$OO ELGV VKDOO EH ÀOHG ZLWK
the Clerk-Treasurer of the
City of Decatur, attached to
Bid Form 96 (revised 2013),
prescribed by the Indiana
State Board of Accounts,
ZLWK WKH QRQFROOXVLRQ DIÀ-
davit executed. (Bid forms
can be obtained from State
Board of Accounts website
www.in.gov/sboa). Each bid
shall be accompanied by a
bid security in the amount
of 10% of the expected total
purchase for the year, either
E\ FHUWLÀHG FKHFN RU D ELG
ERQG $ FHUWLÀHG FKHFN ZLOO
be required if the bidding
party has its principal place
of business outside of the
State of Indiana. The suc-
cessful bidder must furnish
a Performance Bond in the
total amount of the contract.
The Board of Public Works
and Safety of the City of De-
catur, Indiana reserves the
right to reject any and all
bids. These purchases will
be tax exempt.
BOARD OF PUBLIC
WORKS & SAFETY
Phyllis J. Whitright, Clerk-
Treasurer
hspaxlp
STATE OF INDIANACOUN-
TY OF ADAMS SS: IN THE
CIRCUIT COURT CAUSE
NO: 01C01-1308-DR-0063
IN RE: THE CUSTODY
OF: Kamrin Lynn Park,
Minor Child DEBRA SUE
EARHART, Petitioner and
AMANDA LYNN CARLSON,
Respondent
SUMMONS - NOTICE OF
HEARING
1. The name of the person
being sued is: Amanda Lynn
Carlson; and the person to
whom this summons and
Notice is directed is: Aman-
da Lynn Carlson, whose
whereabouts is unknown.
2. The name of the Court
and cause number assigned
to the case is shown above.
3. The title of the case as
shown by the Complaint is
shown above.
4. The name and address
of the Attorney representing
Petitioner, Debra Sue Ear-
hart, is Joseph M. Johnson,
II, 147 South Second Street,
Decatur, Indiana, 46733.
5. The action is for Emer-
gency Temporary Child
Custody and for Permanent
Child Custody of Kamrin
Lynn Park.
6. Amanda Lynn Carlson,
you are hereby advised that
you must respond within
thirty (30) days after the last
publication of this Notice,
and in the event that you fail
to do so, judgment by default
may be entered against you
for the relief requested in the
Petition, that is, that Petition-
er, Debra Sue Earhart, will
be granted custody of Kam-
rin Lynn Park; and you are
QRWLÀHG WKDW D ÀQDO KHDULQJ
on Petitioner's Petition for
Child Custody will be con-
ducted in the Courtroom of
the Adams Circuit Court, in
Decatur, Indiana on the 5th
day of November, 2013, at
10:00 o'clock a.m. and if you
fail to appear at said time
and place, the Petitioner will
be heard and determined in
your absence.
Dated this 20 day of Au-
gust, 2013.
"SEAL"
Gayla M. Reinhart
Clerk, Adams Circuit Court
NOTICE OF HEARING
TO INCREASE MAINTE-
NANCE ASSESSMENTS:
To whom it may concern:
Notice is hereby given
that the Maintenance Re-
port of the Adams County
Indiana Surveyor for the
periodic maintenance of the
Bultemeyer watershed and
the Schedule of assess-
ments made by the Adams
County Drainage Board
KDYHEHHQÀOHGDQGDUH
available for public inspec-
WLRQLQWKHRIÀFHRIWKH
Adams County Surveyor/
Adams County Drainage
Board; and that a hearing
will be held before the
Adams County Drainage
Board on said Schedule of
Assessments on: Septem-
ber 23, 2013 11:00 a.m. in
the Adams County Com-
missioners Room #100, 1st
ÁRRURIWKH$GDPV&RXQW\
Service Complex, Decatur
Indiana. This drain affects
land in: Root Township,
Sections 6 & 7 and this
notice is given pursuant to
Indiana Code 36-9-27-40.
Legal Notice
Legal Notice
Legal Notice Legal Notice
Legal Notice
Legal Notice
Adams County Public
Notice
Adams County, in conjunc-
tion with the Indiana Depart-
ment of Homeland Secu-
rity (IDHS) and the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) has ap-
plied for a Hazard Mitigation
Grant Program project to
DFTXLUHDÁRRGULVNSURSHUW\
RQ6DGGOH/DNHLQUXUDO$G-
ams County.
Under the National En-
vironmental Policy Act
(NEPA), EO 11988 and EO
11990, public notice is re-
quired of any federal actions
WKDW DIIHFW ÁRRGSODLQV RU
wetlands. All necessary per-
mits will be obtained prior to
construction and completion
of the project.
The objectives of the Haz-
ard Mitigation Grant Pro-
gram are to prevent future
losses of lives and property,
to implement state or local
Hazard Mitigation plans, to
enable mitigation measures
to be implemented during
immediate recovery from
disaster, and to provide
IXQGLQJ IRU LGHQWLÀHG DQG
approved hazard mitigation
projects.
Public participation is en-
couraged. Interested parties
and/or citizens are invited to
comment on the project ei-
ther in writing to:
Duane Castaldi, Regional
EnvIronmentaI Ofhcer
FEMA Region V
536 South Clark Street,
6th Floor
Chicago, IL 60605
Or comments may be direct-
ed via e-mail to Mr. Castaldi:
Duane.Castaldi@fema.dhs.
gov
LEGAL NOTICE
Claims hled for consideration and to be acted upon by
the board of County
Commissioners, Monday, September 9, 2013.
For Period: 7/30/2013 to 8/2/2013
Date Claims to be Paid: 8/26/2013
Vendor Amount
Indiana Stamp Company, Inc. .................... 60.62
Grand Total ................................................. 60.62
Certihed to before me this September 6, 2013.
Mary Beery, Auditor
Adams County Service Complex
Decatur, IN 46733
hspaxlp
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c
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96-page book containing historic
Adams County Post Cards.
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streetscapes & more from the 1890s to the
near present-all about Adams County!
1
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FOR YOUR LOVED ONES AS WELL. WHAT A GREAT GIFT
IDEA FOR THOSE WHO CALL ADAMS COUNTY HOME!
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Classifieds
Friday, September 6, 2013 • Page 9A
Decatur Daily Democrat
F O R
S A L E
BY OWNER
210 N. 16th Street
Beautifully landscaped 3 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath
ranch located on quiet street and an extra large
corner lot. 1380 sq ft w/2 car attached garage.
New roof, all new windows, and newer floors,
fixtures,and water heater. Very clean home!
Check out pictures and more details at
www.forsalebyowner.com/23948552
260-701-2400
Quiet country living in a private setting, located off
Hwy 27, one mile South of I-469. Charming 5
bedroom home on 8 acres with a 1 acre stocked
pond. For sale by owner 260-639-0338
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
REALTOR STORAGE
CONSTRUCTION
GUTTERS
DRILLING
PLUMBING
GRAIN ELEVATOR
CONSTRUCTION
E X T R E M E
BUILDERS
32/(%$516‡*$5$*(6
522),1*‡6,',1*
&21&5(7(‡$'',7,216
& MORE
FREE ESTIMATES
(260)
223-3713
PAINTING
AUTO REPAIR
CONSTRUCTION
CARPET CLEANING CONCRETE REPAIR
BAKER’S TRI-STATE
CONCRETE LIFTING
260-301-1269
“WE RAISE
SETTLED
CONCRETE”
www.bakerstristateconcrete.com
PORCHES, PATIOS, DRIVEWAYS,
FLOORS, STEPS & SIDEWALKS
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HEATING & COOLING
5316 S. 500 W., BERNE, IN
(260) 273-6223
» -.. .--, -, · .-
Most sales 24 hour turnover
We are a reputable Amish business and
-. .. .,- ,...
We guarantee our work!
·. ·
Warranty
18 colors
in stock
FREE
estimates
AN METAL SALES MFG
BUY DIRECT & SAVE
We do roofs, custom pole barns,
repair barns. Pole barn packages
available upon request
METAL ROOFING
Saturday, September 7 @ 9:00am
Indiana Antique Tractor Auction
424 S. Van Buren St., Monroe, IN
(Old Automatic Sprinkler Facility) 000 Rd.
Tractors, Farm Machinery, Antique Tractor Parts,
Machinery, Hit Miss Engines, Pedal Tractors/Running &
Non Running Tractors
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctions.com
Saturday, September 7 @ 9am
Ked & Margo Graber, Owners
975 N US 27, Berne, IN
Just North of Graber Insurance Building
Personal Property, Household Items, Antiques, Power
Tools, Furniture, Collectibles, Lawn & Garden Equipment,
Go-Carts, Garden Tools
Miz Lehman Realtors-Auctioneers
(260) 589-2903
or www.mizlehman.com & www.auctionzip.com
Monday, September 9th
Personal Property @ 5pm
Real Estate @ 6pm
Harold Ballard
633 E 1000 N, Decatur, IN
Real Estate: 1456 sq.ft. 3 bedroom home w/ full basement
on 2 acres in North Adams District
Open House: August 19th 5-7pm
Personal Property, Household Items, Power Tools, Shop
Equipment, Appliances, Furniture, Lawn & Garden, Riding
Lawn Mower
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Tuesday, September 10th @ 5:00pm
Swiss Heritage Village
1200 Swiss Way, Berne, IN
Personal Property, Household Items, New Furniture, Yard
Items, Many Misc. Items, Motor Scooter, Jewelry Items,
Gift Cards
Miz Lehman Realtors-Auctioneers
www.mizlehman.com
Thursday, September 19th @ 6pm
Graber Family, Owners
5116 C.R. 56
Auburn, IN
Real Estate: 4 Bedroom, 31/2 Bath home w/ walkout base-
ment, situated on 7 acres with 36’x54’ pole building &
pond. Home is 80% complete & has endless possibilities
Kreuckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
September 21 @ 9:00am
Carla Rose & others
445 E 100 N, Decatur, IN
Household Items: Grandfather clock, Cargo Van, Washer
& Dryer, Snowblower, Pushmower, Push Plows,
Approximately 50 trees, Complete line of catering equip-
ment & accessories
Heartland Auction & Realty
Ron King, Auctioneer
Saturday, September 21 @ 9:00am
General Construction Co.
2404 W 350 S, Berne, IN
2 1/2 miles North of Berne, IN on US 27 to County Rd
350 S., then West 1 1/2 miles
Power Tools, Shop Equipment
General Construction Co. complete business liquidaiton.
Power tools, jacks, forms, scaffolding, etc.
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Monday, September 23rd @ 1pm
Open House Monday September 9th 4-6pm
1205 N US Hwy 27, Berne, IN
Real Estate: Former Dairy Queen, property and equipment
to be offered as one package, 2800+sq.ft. commerical
building on a large lot w/ 200’ x 200’ paved lot.
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Thursday, September 26th @ 6pm
Shawn & Kara Leman
6324 E. State Road 124, Bluffton, IN
Real Estate
Schrader Real Estate & Auction Co., Inc
PO Box 508, Columbia City, IN 46725
800-451-2709
Auctioneer: Al Pfister 260-760-8922
www.schraderauction.com
Friday, September 27th @ 2:20pm
Ervin R. & Ruth Ann Hilty, Owners
4 miles North of Berne, IN on Hwy 27 to 200 S, turn
East and go 2 3/4 miles to auction.
Personal Property, Household Items, Lawn & Garden
Items, Cookbooks, Bird Feeders, Fencing Supplies
Charlie Hill/AU107000054
Saturday, September 28th @ 9:00am
12:00pm RE
Kelly Hawkins Auctions
3443 N 300 E
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: 1500 sq.ft., 3 bedroom home w/ full
basement on nearly 5 acres in Adams Central district
Personal Property, Household Items, Antiques, Collections
(knives, guns)
Open House: 9/16 5-7pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Thursday, October 3rd @ 7pm
Florence M. Shady
Revocable Trust
Carol Terhune, Trustee
37+/- acres tillable ground-section 6, Union Township
Auction to be held at Union Township Hall
4655 E 800 N Decatur
Farm Land
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
AUCTION CALENDAR
509 N 3rd St
Newly painted, approximately 2000 sq. ft, 3
BR, 2 BA, utility room, gas log fireplace,
basement, detached large 2 car garage, fenced
yard on a double corner lot.
Call 260-517-8132
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6539 N 200 W• Uniondale, IN
2-story country home; 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths
on 1 1/2 acres in Northern Wells. Huge 2-car
garage with overhead loft for storage or bonus
room. Multi-purpose medium sized barn and
asphalt driveway. Very well kept! $185,000
Call for appointment 260-750-3534
Condo for sale
1053 Grenelefe Ct
3 bedroom, 2 full baths, vaulted ceiling, loft, over
1900 sq.ft., 2 car garage, large lot, 13th fairway
$129,500
724-9417 or 223-7000
Condo for sale • 1000 Grenelefe Ct
1300 sq.ft., 2 car garage, AC, vaulted ceiling in
living room, 2 full baths, 10x12 deck with awning,
wooded lot, 12th tee
$107,900
260-223-7000
For sale by Owner $122,500
4 Bedroom 1 and 1/2 baths. 1535 Square ft.
Hickory cabinets. New counter tops, hardwood
floors, sun room, basement
New siding, metal roof, windows,insulated, 2 car
detached garage with a new garage door.
Tread way in ground heated pool
Private fenced in yard.
260-701-1040
Broker Owned
326 N 4th St
3 bedroom home on quiet street, fireplace,
refurbished hardwood floors throughout,
new doors, countertops and linoleum, full
basement. $65,000
728-2352
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SUDOKU ® by American Profile
SUDOKU ® Answers for previous day
Taking a look at the way
others do things will spark
new ideas for future proj-
ects in the year ahead.
You will be able to move
forward with ambitious
objectives and the help
and support you need. Your rewards
will be greatly enjoyed and much
deserved.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- Opportunity and discipline will take
you a long way. Don’t put off anything
that will bring you closer to your goal.
Call in favors and reestablish connec-
tions that could help you advance.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Consider what isn’t working in your life
and begin the process that will lead to
peace of mind and a bright future.
Don’t hesitate to give someone else
the chance to take control.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- A geographical change will spark
enthusiasm and inspiration. You may
need to negotiate with someone who
could greatly help your cause. Learn
as you go, and you will excel.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- Be secretive about your
plans. Strategize carefully and get
everything in place before you make
your move. You can come out on top,
but your timing must be faultless.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Don’t let your emotions stand
between you and success. Someone
you love may sabotage your plans if
you have been neglectful of them. Take
care of both personal and professional
responsibilities to minimize obstacles.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Partnership situations will be dif-
ficult. Expect to face a standoff that
could alter the way you do things in the
future. Offer an experimental way to
solve differences, and you may find
common ground.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- You’re in a good cycle for contracts,
agreements and moneymaking oppor-
tunities. Share ideas with someone
who has as much to contribute as you
do. An unusual path could be the one
to take to reach your objective.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Consider a certain change, but don’t
jump in too quickly. You aren’t likely to
get what you want if you are restless
and impatient. Let someone else make
the first move.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Keep things moving along.
Stubbornness will be what stands
between you and success. A practical
approach to a job will help you avoid
complaints and interference.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Travel and communication will inspire
you. The fresh ideas coming your way
may seem challenging at first, but with
a couple of adjustments you’ll find a
way to make things happen.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- If you invite friends over to enjoy the
comfort of your home, you will be able
to successfully ask for favors and sup-
port. At the very least, a fun time will be
had by all.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Not everyone will agree with your
choices, but you have to do what’s best
for you. Be receptive and polite in the
face of criticism, but trust your own
mind above others. Love is on the
rise.
Astro-Graph
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 10A • Friday, September 6, 2013
Beetle Bailey ® Mort Walker
THE FAMILY CIRCUS ®
by Bil Keane
THE LOCKHORNS ®
by Bunny Hoest and John Reiner
ZITS ® by Jerry Scott and Jim Burgman
THE BORN LOSER ® by Art and Chip Sansom
Blondie ® Dean Young & John Marshall
ARLO & JANIS ® by Jimmy Johnson
FRANK & ERNEST ® by Bob Thaves
BIG NATE ® by Lincoln Peirce
CRANKSHAFT ® by Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers
BABY BLUES ® by Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
THE GRIZZWELLS ® by Bill Schorr
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
IN PAPER
OR ONLINE
Decatur Daily Democrat
Friday, September 6, 2013 • Page 11A
DDD SportS ScoreboarD
National League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 85 54 .612 —
Washington 71 68 .511 14
New York 63 75 .457 21 1/2
Philadelphia 63 77 .450 22 1/2
Miami 52 86 .377 32 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 81 58 .583 —
St. Louis 80 60 .571 1 1/2
Cincinnati 79 62 .560 3
Milwaukee 60 79 .432 21
Chicago 59 80 .424 22
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 83 56 .597 —
Arizona 70 68 .507 12 1/2
Colorado 66 75 .468 18
San Diego 62 77 .446 21
San Francisco 62 77 .446 21
———
Wednesday’s Games
N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 2
Chicago Cubs 9, Miami 7
Arizona 4, Toronto 3, 10 innings
San Francisco 13, San Diego 5
Washington 3, Philadelphia 2
St. Louis 5, Cincinnati 4, 16 innings
Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 3
Colorado 7, L.A. Dodgers 5
Thursday’s Games
Cincinnati 6, St. Louis 2
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Milwaukee (Lohse 9-8) at Chicago
Cubs (Rusin 2-3), 2:20 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 13-5) at Philadelphia
(Cl.Lee 11-6), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 7-3) at Cleve-
land (Kazmir 7-7), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 4-7) at Cin-
cinnati (Leake 11-6), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Haren 8-12) at Miami
(Fernandez 10-6), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 7-9) at St.
Louis (J.Kelly 7-3), 8:15 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 8-7) at San Diego
(B.Smith 0-1), 10:10 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 13-5) at San Fran-
cisco (Petit 2-0), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 4:05
p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Mets at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20
p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 4:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 8:05 p.m.
American League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 85 57 .599 —
Tampa Bay 77 61 .558 6
New York 75 65 .536 9
Baltimore 74 65 .532 9 1/2
Toronto 64 76 .457 20
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 81 59 .579 —
Cleveland 74 65 .532 6 1/2
Kansas City 73 67 .521 8
Minnesota 61 77 .442 19
Chicago 56 83 .403 24 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 80 59 .576 —
Texas 80 59 .576 —
Los Angeles 64 74 .464 15 1/2
Seattle 63 77 .450 17 1/2
Houston 46 93 .331 34
———
Wednesday’s Games
Houston 6, Minnesota 5
Oakland 11, Texas 4
Arizona 4, Toronto 3, 10 innings
Cleveland 6, Baltimore 4
N.Y. Yankees 6, Chicago White Sox
5
Boston 20, Detroit 4
Seattle 6, Kansas City 4
Tampa Bay 3, L.A. Angels 1
Thursday’s Games
Kansas City 7, Seattle 6, 13 innings
Boston 9, N.Y. Yankees 8, 10 innings
Baltimore 3, Chicago White Sox 1
Houston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 10:05
p.m.
Friday’s Games
Boston (Doubront 10-6) at N.Y. Yan-
kees (Pettitte 10-9), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 4-11)
at Baltimore (Feldman 4-4), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 7-3) at Cleve-
land (Kazmir 7-7), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 12-7) at Kansas
City (Shields 10-8), 8:10 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 11-12) at Minnesota
(Pelfrey 5-10), 8:10 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 5-8) at Oakland
(Griffin 12-9), 10:05 p.m.
Texas (Garza 3-2) at L.A. Angels
(C.Wilson 14-6), 10:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 8-3) at Seattle
(Iwakuma 12-6), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 1:05
p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 1:35
p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
National Football League
By The Associated Press
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Buffalo 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Miami 0 0 0 .000 0 0
New England 0 0 0 .000 0 0
N.Y. Jets 0 0 0 .000 0 0
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Jacksonville 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0 0
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0 0
San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0 0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 0 0 0 .000 0 0
N.Y. Giants 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Washington 0 0 0 .000 0 0
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Carolina 0 0 0 .000 0 0
New Orleans 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Tampa Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 0 0
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 0
San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Seattle 0 0 0 .000 0 0
St. Louis 0 0 0 .000 0 0
———
Thursday’s Game
Denver 49, Baltimore 27
Sunday’s Games
Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago, 1 p.m.
New England at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Miami at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at San Francisco, 4:25
p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 6:55
p.m.
Houston at San Diego, 10:20 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 12
N.Y. Jets at New England, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sep. 15
Dallas at Kansas City, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, 1 p.m.
Washington at Green Bay, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 1 p.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 1 p.m.
San Diego at Philadelphia, 1 p.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 4:05
p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 4:25 p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Giants, 4:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Monday, Sep. 16
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:40 p.m.
Thursday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Activated
C Derek Norris from the 15-day DL.
National League
WASHINGTON NATIONALS—
Claimed 1B-3B Mauro Gomez off
waivers from Toronto.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
LOS ANGELES LAKERS—Signed
G Xavier Henry.
SACRAMENTO KINGS—Named
Chris Mullin as an adviser to the
owner and general manager.
Boilers set sights on ISU
A view from a fan...
By WYLIE SIRK
Purdue’s trip home from Cincinnati on Saturday did
not bring the results that the sendoff had planned.
It appeared Purdue players allowed the numbers to
overtake them. In the last 17 seconds of the first half
Cincinnati moved ahead 14-7. Coming back in the third
quarter was not favorable for Purdue and their defense
did not hold Cincinnati from the end zone. By the end
of the game the Bearcats had 425 yards of offense and
held Purdue to 226 yards beating them 42-7 at Nippert
Stadium.
Purdue’s quarterback Rob Henry struggled with a
completion of 18-35 for 161 passing yards. Coach Hazell
indicated after viewing the films on Sunday that mis-
takes were clearly identified. Gaps were left on the line
with players in wrong positions, missed assignments,
turnovers, and penalties all contributing to the loss, yet
Coach Hazell indicates it is, “fixable and encouraged
about the football team."
Indiana State provides the next opportunity for a
Purdue win with the Boilers' opening home game sched-
uled for this Saturday at noon in Ross-Ade Stadium.
The Boilermakers have a history with Indiana State as
Purdue leads the series, 3-0.
Last Saturday Indiana State lost at Indiana, 73-35.
Even with this kind of loss for Indiana State, Coach
Hazell cautions his players to execute, be quick in the
huddle, position on the line, and make plays! T h e
Boilermakers must play as a team and encourage each
other during the game.
Cody Webster, a member of the 2013 Ray Guy Award
watch list for the nation’s top punter, is a solid team
player and will be valuable against Indiana State. He
brings from last Saturday three punts for 169 yards, an
average of 56.3 yards. Webster’s 73 yard punt against
Cincinnati was fumbled and recovered by Purdue, which
set up an 8-yard quarterback keeper from Rob Henry for
a touchdown.
For the fans the football team has created a new tradi-
tion, 211 Session, which is a major pep rally held inside
Mackey Arena for all home games. The 211 Session will
begin two hours and 11minutes prior to kickoff. It is an
opportunity for fans to cheer and show support along
with the “All American” Marching Band, head coach
Darrell Hazell, the team, the cheerleaders and Purdue
Pete. The inaugural 211 Session is Saturday, September
7, at 9:49 a.m. in Mackey Arena.
Saturday’s game against Indiana State will set the
momentum needed for the following week with Notre
Dame at Purdue on Saturday,September 14. Purdue
fans must be heard and seen! Wear your gold and black
on game day!
Purdue Football 2013! Boiler Up!
Knights sweep Braves, 5-0
KENDAL L VI L L E—
Bellmont received a rude
welcome to NHC play on
the tennis courts Tuesday
night as they ventured to
Noble County to face the
Knights in a 5-0 loss.
"We ran into a buzz saw
tonight," Bellmont coach
Joe Selking noted after
the match. "East Noble is
a tough team. Everyone
fought hard and nobody
gave up but they are a
squad who want to be on
top of the conference this
season and based on what
we saw tonight that might
be a possibility."
Evan Selking lost his
first match of the season
to Austin Mahomed, a
freshman ranked #10 in
the state for 16-year olds.
In the only match that
saw three sets, Selking
battled for nearly three
and a half hours before
falling behind in set three
5-2. After clawing back to
a 5-5 tie, Mahomed coun-
tered with big shots late
and ended with the win in
three sets 6-2, 4-6, 5-7.
"This was a great gauge
for Evan," pointed out
coach Selking. "The way
he fought for every point
was a great sign and with
an overall record of 6-1
now, he should do well the
rest of the way."
Robbie Ehlerding fell
at number two singles to
junior Evan Hart 6-2, 6-2,
while at three, Aaron Dills
was a winner over Austin
O'Campo 6-2, 6-1. blank-
ing Bellmont at the singles
slots.
On the doubles end,
Logan Baker and Ryan
Okoniewski lost to
Bremmen Biggins and Kyle
Manns 6-0, 6-0, and at two
doubles, Ben Fullenkamp
and Conner Hess suffered
their first loss together at
the hands of Carl Karmer
and Jonathan Tales 6-2,
6-2.
The reserves lost their
match 8-1 against the
Knights with the only win
coming from the three
doubles slot when Josh
Custer and Kevin Schueler
were winners 8-1.
"Josh and Kevin played
a great match and ended
up with the win. They
keep getting better with
each match and look to
move up the lineup for us,"
noted coach Selking.
The Braves continue
their tough stretch with
conference champions
Carroll looming on the
road Tuesday starting at
4:30 p.m.
FORT WAYNE—
Following the conclu-
sion of the Hotel Fitness
Championship, the
Western Golf Association
announces that 25,700
spectators attended the
inaugural tournament at
Sycamore Hills Golf Club
in Fort Wayne from Aug.
26-Sept. 1.
“The crowds were large
and players were compli-
mentary of the course
design, creating the
perfect atmosphere to
watch world-class golf,”
said Duke Butler IV,
tournament director, on
behalf of the WGA. “The
setting offered a first-
class spectator experi-
ence with great views
and easy access around
the course. We are very
appreciative of the sup-
port the Fort Wayne com-
munity showed during
this exciting event.”
Trevor Immelman
rolled in 12-foot birdie
putt on the final hole
Sunday to win the Hotel
Fitness Championship,
the first of four events in
the new Web.com Tour
Finals events for 2013
that will determine the
50 players who earn
cards for the 2013-14
PGA TOUR season under
the TOUR's enhanced
qualifying system.
Immelman posted
a final-day 66 at the
Sycamore Hills Golf Club
to finish at 20-under par,
one better than 54-hole
leader Patrick Cantlay,
who missed an 8-foot
birdie on the last hole
that would have forced
a playoff with the 2008
Masters champion.
“As word continues to
spread about the tourna-
ment, we will have room
to grow and make the
event even more exciting
for the years to come,”
said Butler.
Ft. Wayne draws golf crowd
Djokovic jumps into semis over Youzhny at US Open
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer
NEW YORK (AP) —
Contorting his body while
sliding into shots, Novak
Djokovic used his typical
relentless defense to reach
the U.S. Open semifinals
for the seventh year in a
row.
Not quite as unflinch-
ingly dominant as he
was during his first four
matches in the tourna-
ment, the top-seeded
Djokovic quickly overcame
a one-set lull Thursday
night against 21st-seeded
Mikhail Youzhny of Russia
before finishing off a 6-3,
6-2, 3-6, 6-0 victory.
‘‘Level of confidence is
right at the top, very close,
because I have been play-
ing most of my matches
here very aggressive, very
dominantly,’’ Djokovic
said. ‘‘I have been very
satisfied with my per-
formances overall in the
whole tournament so far.
And even tonight, even
though I dropped a set, I
feel I was in control.’’
It put Djokovic in his
14th consecutive Grand
Slam semifinal, a 3 1/2-
year stretch that is the
second-longest in men’s
tennis history. Roger
Federer’s record is 23.
‘‘I’ve been always try-
ing to play my best ten-
nis at Grand Slams,’’
said Djokovic, whose six
trophies from his sport’s
most important tourna-
ments include the 2011
U.S. Open.
He won the first 14
sets he played these two
weeks, taking under two
hours to advance each
time. But he faltered
against Youzhny in the
third, making 16 unforced
errors and getting broken
twice — the only service
games Djokovic lost in the
match.
‘‘After I lost (the) third
set, I definitely tried to
regroup and focus on
every point individual-
ly and start playing the
same game that I had in
first two sets,’’ Djokovic
said.
He will face ninth-seed-
ed Stanislas Wawrinka,
who upset defending
champion Andy Murray
6-4, 6-3, 6-2 on Thursday
to reach his first major
semifinal.
While Youzhny made
things interesting for a
short while, Djokovic
made sure there would
not be another big sur-
prise.
Now he gets a chance
to try to reach a fifth U.S.
Open final. In addition
to his title, he was the
runner-up in New York in
2007, 2010 and 2012.
That loss a year ago
came against Murray,
who also beat Djokovic in
the Wimbledon final this
July.
But Djokovic doesn’t
need to worry about that
happening again.
Instead, the six-time
major champion will face
Wawrinka. Djokovic has
won 12 of their 14 tour
matches, including the
last 11. The most recent
came on the hard courts
of January’s Australian
Open, when Djokovic
edged Wawrinka 12-10 in
a fifth set en route to the
championship.
‘‘Definitely one of the
most exciting matches I
have played in my life
on this surface,’’ Djokovic
said.
Youzhny is one of the
dozen active men who
have reached the quar-
terfinals at each of the
four Grand Slam tourna-
ments at least once, and
he made it as far as the
semifinals at New York
twice, in 2006 and 2010.
But what he might be
best known for are some
of his on-court antics,
including once bashing
himself in the head with
his racket hard enough to
draw blood.
Coming off a drain-
ing five-set victory over
2001 U.S. Open cham-
pion Lleyton Hewitt in the
fourth round, Youzhny
started slowly Thursday.
He finally converted his
eighth break chance, 100
minutes into the match,
in a game that included a
lunging retrieval of a drop
volley. That gave him a
3-1 lead in the third set,
and when he held serve to
go up 4-1, Youzhny let out
a guttural yell.
By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Pro Football Writer
DENVER (AP) — Peyton
Manning and the Denver
Broncos waited eight long
months, then another 33
minutes, to get the season
started.
A record-tying seven
touchdown passes —
something no one had
done in 44 years — made
it worth the while.
Connecting with his
most prized addition, Wes
Welker, and former college
basketball player Julius
Thomas and Demaryius
Thomas for two TDs each,
Manning directed Denver
to a 49-27 victory over
Super Bowl champion
Baltimore on Thursday
night in the NFL open-
er, a much-anticipated
rematch against the team
that ended the Broncos’
playoff run in January.
‘‘Peyton had an amaz-
ing night,’’ Broncos coach
John Fox said. ‘‘Peyton’s
had a lot of amazing
nights.’’
Not like this, though.
Manning is the sixth
QB in NFL history to throw
seven TD passes in a game
and the first since Joe
Kapp did it for Minnesota
against Baltimore on Sept.
28, 1969.
The others read like
a Who’s Who of passers
who came along before the
NFL became so pass-hap-
py: Sid Luckman, Adrian
Burk, George Blanda, Y.A.
Tittle.
Manning was 27 of
42 for 462 yards with no
interceptions for an off-
the-charts quarterback
rating of 141.1.
All part of a thorough
thrashing of the team that
put a harsh end to what
had looked like a Super
Bowl-bound 2012 in
Denver. The rematch came
nearly eight months after
Baltimore beat Denver
38-35 in double overtime
on an icy January night in
the same stadium.
The hero on that night
was Jacoby Jones, who
caught a 70-yard TD pass
over Rahim Moore with
31 seconds left to tie it
in regulation. His night
was cut short when he
went back to field a punt
and teammate Brynden
Trawick plowed into him
at the Baltimore 15. Jones
left with a sprained right
knee and didn’t return.
The Broncos waited all
offseason for the rematch,
then for 33 minutes more
when a lightning storm in
the area delayed the start.
When they took the
field, it was clear how
much had changed.
Pass rusher Elvis
Dumervil moved from
Denver to Baltimore as
part of a bizarre, fax-
infused contract squabble.
Receiver Brandon Stokley
also switched sides. The
Broncos lost their best
defender, Von Miller, to
a drug suspension while
Baltimore had to rebuild
its ‘D’ after losing emo-
tional leaders Ed Reed and
Ray Lewis.
The Ravens suffered
another loss of sorts when
they were forced to play the
season’s traditional opener
on the road because of a
conflict with the Orioles in
Baltimore. The NFL hung
a Flacco banner above
Denver’s stadium, but he
hardly felt at home.
Armed with a new six-
year, $120.6 million con-
tract, he matched the
Broncos score for score
in the first half but had
to play catch-up after fall-
ing behind 35-17 early in
the third quarter. His final
numbers: 34 of 62 for 362
yards with two TDs and
two interceptions.
It was such a runaway,
the Broncos were throw-
ing away touchdowns
by the end. Linebacker
Danny Trevathan fum-
bled his pick-6 just shy
of the goal line, pulling
a Leon Lett imitation by
celebrating too soon and
the ball bounced out of the
end zone for a touchback
instead of a touchdown.
No worries.
Denver was ahead
42-17 at that point.
Wearing an orange-and-
gray glove like the one he
wore on that icy January
night the last time these
teams met, Manning took
a while to get warmed
up against a Baltimore
defense that had to replace
seven Super Bowl start-
ers.
He ditched the glove
once the rains stopped —
and then he was unstop-
pable.
Manning’s seventh
TD pass covered only a
few yards in the air but
Demaryius Thomas, a
former first-round pick,
hauled in the pass in the
left flat and turned on
the jets, racing past sev-
eral gassed defenders for a
78-yard play that capped
Denver’s big night.
Manning tosses record-tying 7 TDs in NFL opener
By DYLAN MALONE
Bellmont made a clean
sweep of this week's
opponents as they fin-
ished off Snider in three
quick sets for a 3-0 start
to their September.
Playing at the Teepee
for the first time in six
games, the Squaws
improved their mark to
9-3 on the season with
the scores 25-9, 25-9,
25-15.
Snider entered the
contest with a few play-
ers down from injuries
but coach Craig Krull
still did not know what
he may get from the
Panthers on Thursday
night.
"I wasn't sure what to
expect at all," the coach
admitted. "They had
some girls coming off of
injury and their coach
mentioned that they were
young and a little inexpe-
rienced. I give them a lot
of credit, though. They
were talking and staying
motivated even when we
were winning big."
Bellmont made their
statement early with an
11-0 start in the first
set behind a pair of aces
from Rachel Salerno
on serve. The Squaws
would continue their
dominance throughout
the set as the Panthers
struggled receiving the
serves from Bellmont's
Salerno, Janaya Wilder,
and Bailee Hankenson.
Before Snider knew
what hit them, the
score was 20-5 and the
Panthers still had yet
to register a kill in the
match. Bellmont would
play even with Snider to
finish out the first set.
Despite giving up the
first point of the sec-
ond set, Bellmont played
similar to the first frame
allowing no breathing
room for the Panthers
and jumping ahead to
a 9-4 lead following a
Wilder ace. After an
exchange of side outs,
Holly Hankenson joined
in the ace party making
it 12-5.
From that point on,
Bellmont would score 13
of the final 17 points
closing out the set on
a combination of good
defense and several mis-
cues from the young
Panthers' squad.
Coach Krull used
the opportunity to once
again play his second
stringers in the third set
and they did not dis-
appoint. Snider came
out more inspired in
the final stanza keep-
ing the match close and
even leading 10-8 at one
point.
That two-point lead
would be the turning
point, however, as the
Bellmont squad pro-
duced a 14-3 run to lead
22-13 on some stingy
defense and several big
blocks at the net. The
Squaws would have no
problems handling the
rest of the third set
allowing just two more
Panther points.
"Talking about some
role players, we really
had to fight through that
third game but we really
didn't lose a step," coach
Krull praised of his sec-
ond group. "It's really
starting to come together
for us as a unit."
Bellmont's shellack-
ing of the Panthers was
the third beating of the
week after dominating
Heritage on Tuesday and
Northrop on Wednesday.
"This week may not
have had the high-
est level of competition
for us this season but
the amount of ener-
gy and intensity we've
kept up throughout the
entire match has really
impressed me," analyzed
the BHS coach.
Through the three
matches this week,
Bellmont has outscored
their opponents by a
total of 225-87.
Against Snider, Wilder
led with nine kills with
three aces and three
digs. Bailee and Holly
Hankenson each had
four kills with Madison
Glancy and Madalyn
Mann each contributing
three kills each.
Bailee produced 18
assists with two aces,
five digs, two solo blocks,
and two helpers at the
net. Holly had one ace
with three digs, a solo
block, and three help-
ers.
Taylor Rhymer had
two assists, while Liv
Fuelling and Amanda
Hunter each had a kill,
Taylor Bebout had a dig,
Salerno had two aces,
Emily Roman had two
digs, Natalie Busse had
an assist and four digs,
and Jessah Okoniewski
had an ace and an
assist.
The JV won their con-
test in a tight three-set
match 25-24, 24-25,
15-11.
Bebout led with eight
kills, six assists, three
digs, and two aces.
Hunter had two aces, 11
assists, six kills, and a
block. Courtney Loshe
had two aces, three kills,
and three digs, while
Andi Schultz had three
kills and four digs.
The frosh won their
C-team battle in three
sets as well 25-12, 20-25,
15-8.
Erika MacDowell had
14 kills, two aces, and
two blocks to pace the
Squaws. Kindra Glancy
had seven kills and a
block, Abbie Lepper had
six kills, 18 assists, and
two aces, and Allyssa
Brune had two digs and
an ace.
Bellmont is off until
next Tuesday when they
travel to North Side
starting with the JV at 6
p.m.
SAdams swept at Norwell
KINGSLAND—The Norwell Knights swept the
Lady Starfires on Thursday night 25-21, 25-23,
25-13.
South Adams was led offensively by Cady
Farlow who managed six kills with five blocks and
eight digs. Alyssa Bluhm aided with five kills, nine
assists, and three digs, while Caralie Farlow had
two blocks, three kills, three assists, and five digs.
Other stats for SA included Morgan Alberson
with two kills and 10 digs, Emma Rosswurm with
four assists, an ace, and two digs, Lauren Smith
with nine digs, and Abby Myers with one block, one
kill, one ace, and five digs.
The JV lost in two sets to Norwell 25-10, 25-13.
Kylie Grabau had five aces, two kills, three
assists, three digs, and three blocks for SA, while
Myers had an ace with two kills and nine digs. Casi
Evans had a kill with four assists and four digs,
while Chastity Guereca had a kill and six digs and
Treva Clingenpeel had a kill with three digs.
The Stars travel to Southern Wells next Tuesday
beginning with the reserves at 6 p.m.
Lady Jets comeback at B.
Luers; win five-setter
FORT WAYNE—Adams Central won a hard-
fought five-set battle on the road Thursday night
as they overcame a deficit down two sets against
Bishop Luers 25-20, 25-22, 21-25, 13-25, 11-15.
Aiding the cause offensively for the Lady Jets
was Whitney Peterson who ended with 18 kills, two
blocks, two aces, and eight digs. Haley Gross was
not far behind with 16 kills, two blocks, and four
digs.
Abby Snyder aided both sides of the ball with 14
kills and a team-high 20 digs defensively as well
as two aces. Jenni Baumer had eight kills with six
digs, while Abbey Lichtle had seven kills with six
digs, three aces and an assist.
Madi Schwartz was the maestro of the offense
with an impressive 50 assists on the night on top
of 13 digs and three kills. Liz Luginbill had 16 digs
at libero, while Jenny Schultz had nine digs and an
ace and Anna Burkhart had two aces.
The Lady Jet reserves won a two-set contest
25-16, 25-22 over the Lady Knights.
Annie Isch helped the attack with four kills and
two aces, while Kylie Baller had two kills and eight
digs. Kaela Sharp had two kills with three aces,
Sarah Luginbill had a kill with eight digs, Emmie
Schultz had eight assists with three digs, and
Taylor Biberstine had six kills with two blocks and
a dig.
The Lady Jets are on the road at Carroll on
Monday night starting at 6 p.m. for the JV con-
test.
Willis wins ACAC title; SA
take 2nd place as team
LEO-CEDARVILLE—In the first girls conference
tournament ever for the Allen County Athletic
Conference, Leo used home-course advantage to
take first place as a team with a 176.
South Adams took second place with a 192 as a
team but also hoisted the top medalist in the field
as Sydney Willis added the All-Conference award to
her shelf of accomplishments this season shooting
a low 39 (+4) on the course at Cedar Creek's back
nine.
All five of Leo's golfers made the All-ACAC list
behind SA's Willis including Ashley Rimes who
shot a 42, Anna Feldman with a 44, Brooke Mosier
with a 46, Haley Parker with a 51, and Katie Byers
with a 44.
For the Stars, Alaina Johnston's 49 and Kelli
Lehman's 51 were good enough to make all-ACAC
honors as well with Jaci Gorrell's 53 and Alleigh
Wingler's 56 earning honorable mention.
Southern Wells earned third place in the tour-
ney with a 220 and Bluffton finished last with
a 239 team score. The Raiders' top shooter was
Jasmine Gearheart with a 52 (honorable mention)
and Bluffton's Kaitlyn Hart and Cassidy McKinney
each shot 60.
The Stars travel to Mississinewa on Monday
starting at 4:30 p.m.
Elementary mile run slated
The Kinderlauf One-Mile elementary cross coun-
try race is scheduled for a 5:30 p.m. start on Friday,
October 4 at Swiss Heritage Village in Berne.
The race is open to boys and girls in grades 3-5
(younger runners allowed but will have to compete
in third grade division). There will be two races
including a girls race at 5:30 p.m. and a boys race
at 6 p.m.
Awards will be presented to the top 10 finish-
ers in each grade, and to the top overall boys and
girls teams. Registration forms are available on
the South Adams Schools athletic department web
page.
The cost will be $5 per racer by September 27 or
else $10 on race day. Checks can be made payable
to Berne Track Club and mailed to 663 Sprunger
Street in Berne, Indiana. For more information,
contact Clint Anderson at 820-3792 or by email at
andersonabode@gmail.com.
Squaws down Barons at CC
Bellmont hoisted one more conference win on
Thursday night when they downed DeKalb with
ease, 174-196 at Cross Creek Golf Club.
The Squaws moved to 5-1 in the NHC with the
win and now sit in second place with only one
more conference battle left as they will head to East
Noble next Tuesday at Cobblestone Club.
Rachel Klingensmith shot a personal best 38 to
lead the Squaws as medalist. Macy Phegley shot
well for Bellmont also with a 43 on the day. Filling
in for Julia Brewer on the varsity roster, Rylee
Hamilton filled in nicely shooting a 46, third best
for the Squaws, with Kelsey Roth landing a 47 and
Morgan Ellsworth shooting a 50.
DeKalb’s best shooters tied at 47 from Caddie
Skidmore and Kelsey Helmcamp. Sydney Weghorst
shot a 50, while Micalla Schannen shot a 52 and
Hope Kelham a 53 rounding the scores.
At the JV level, Lexy Norby led with a 48 followed
by Sarah Evans with a 49 and Maddie Strickler
with a 55.
Bellmont’s match with East Noble next Tuesday
begins at 4:30 p.m.
SportS HigHligHtS
By Dylan Malone
www.decaturdailydemocrat.com
Live Broadcasting
Football • 6:40 pm
Bellmont vs. Columbia City
on
Fri., Sept. 6th
D
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Page 11A
Sports
Scoreboard
Page 12a Friday, SePtember 6, 2013
inSide
NFL—Broncos 49, Ravens 27...MLB—Orioles 3, W. Sox 1...Reds 6, Cardinals 2...R. Sox 9, Yankees 8
Squaws win third straight win; Panthers swept in three
MANN DOWN—Bellmont outside hitter Madalyn Mann (middle) sends a rocket zooming to the Starfire
side during Bellmont’s win over South Adams last week as Bailee Hankenson (left) and Rachel Salerno
(right) look on. The Squaws picked up their third win this week with a victory over Snider at the Teepee on
Thursday night. (Photo by Deb Shannon)
A view
from a fan
Page 11A
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