Skip to main content

Saturday, July 20, 2013

July 19, 2013

To view the E-Edition of the newspaper, please login. If you have not subscribed to the E-Edition, you can do so by subscribing here.

The rates for the E-Edition are:

1 day 99¢
3 months $18 for 90 days
6 months $36 for 180 days
12 months $72 for 360 days

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

I N D I A N A P O L I S
(AP) — The state has
launched a website
seeking suggestions on
ways existing Indiana
regulations could be
simplified or eliminated
in order to streamline
rules for businesses.
Gov. Mike Pence
says he hopes Indiana
residents will help the
Office of Management
and Budget find ways
to improve the state’s
regulations, which he
says has increased the
complexity and expense
of Indiana residents’
lives. Pence says every
dollar not spent on reg-
ulatory paperwork by
Indiana businesses is a
dollar that can be spent
putting people to work.
The website to offer
suggestions is: www.
in.gov/cutredtape .
Advertise Today!
Call 724-2121
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
The Decatur Daily
Democrat
75¢ at newstands
Inside
Page 6A
Daniels part of
push made by
conservatives
An independent newspaper serving Adams County, Indiana since 1857 July 20, 2013 SATURDAY
IN BRIEF
Here’s chance
to cut some
red tape!
Contact Us
By phone: 724-2121
By Fax: 724-7981
On The Web
www.decaturdaily
democrat.com
Bring canned
goods to the
fair for 4-Hers
On this date
With the theme of
“Lending a Helping
Hand” at this year’s
4-H fair, the French
Peppy Peppers will hold
a canned food collec-
tion.
The Peppers ask that
people bring canned
goods to the fair at any
time. A collection site
will be situated beside
the fair office in the
Exposition Hall. The
club will also collect
any canned goods dur-
ing the parade.
All donations will
benefit the Monroe food
pantry.
In 1969, astronauts
Neil Armstrong and
Edwin ‘‘Buzz’’ Aldrin
became the first men to
walk on the moon after
reaching the surface in
their Apollo 11 lunar
module.
SOME DAY ...This is an artist’s rendering of the
local Peace Monument with its waterfall fountain
restored on the north side and the Peace Wall with
names of veterans.
Work on monument to begin
By BOB SHRALUKA
Work to reinstall a waterfall
fountain on the north side of
the Peace Monument in Decatur
is scheduled to begin next week
as the date for the monument’s
rededication draws ever nearer.
Joe H. Construction of Berne
is the general contractor for the
project, supported by subcontrac-
tors Don R. Myers Plumbing &
Heating of Berne, Kiess Electric
of Decatur and Berne Ready Mix.
The latter has already measured
the monument for the addition of
the limestone.
County Maintenance Depart-
ment Director Dave Meyer said
Thursday that some 130 bricks
have been sold for the Wall of
Peace, bringing in enough revenue
to begin work on the fountain.
Another $30,000 or so will be
needed to construct the wall at the
monument site, he noted.
“We have 130 bricks sold and
more (purchases) are coming in
every day,” Meyer said.
July 31 will be the final day to
purchase an engraved brick at the
current prices: a 4 X 8 brick with
three lines of type for $70 or an 8
X 8 brick with six lines of type for
$135.
Forms to purchase a brick are
available at the county auditor’s
office in the Service Complex.
Forms may be secured online by
going to www.adams countypeac-
emonument.com and clicking on
“wall of peace.”
For questions, Meyer may be
contacted at (260) 517-8090.
All proceeds from the sale of
bricks — and other souvenirs —
will be used for construction of
the wall and waterfall fountain,
and the brick purchases are tax
deductible.
Meyer said several corporate
sponsors have joined the effort
to redo and rededicate the monu-
ment, and it is hoped that more
“will come on board.”
Sponsor names will be placed
on a plaque at the monument
site.
Dedication
The monument, the first peace
monument built in the United
States, was dedicated on October
30 of 1913, on the southwest cor-
ner of the courthouse.
The rededication ceremony will
be held on Saturday, August 24,
starting at 2:30 p.m.
Third District U.S. Congressman
Marlin Stutzman has agreed to
speak at the event, local officials
said.
The White House was noti-
fied, but Decatur Mayor John
Schultz said this week he has
been contracted by an administra-
tion official extending regrets that
President Obama would not be
able to attend.
SA duo
11th in
nationals
It was announced at
last week’s South Adams
School Board meet-
ing that students Kane
Bray and Isaac Shawver
placed 11th at the Ford/
AAA national contest for
auto mechanics.
A Ford news release
says the competition fos-
ters young people’s inter-
est in the automotive
industry through a spir-
ited nationwide compe-
tition with opportunities
to win prizes, scholar-
ships, tools and awards
along with an experience
that could help shape the
future of their careers.
The competition con-
sists of two-person teams
of 11th and 12th grade
automotive technology
students attending sec-
ondary schools and col-
leges (serving local high
Kane Bray (l) and Isaac Shawver
schools) with at least
one full-time or part-
time automotive instruc-
tor. The national finals
include a written test
and a “hands-on” com-
petition, similar to the
“hands-on” competition
at the state level, but
with a different, new
Ford vehicle.
The team with the
fewest quality-of-work-
manship demerits and
the best combined total
score of repair time and
written exam scores was
the winner.
Here we go once again with another
Adams County 4-H Fair!
Although the fairgrounds in Monroe
have been busy for a week or so now,
the fair hits the launching pad on
Sunday and rolls for five days with all
manner of activities — several of them
new — plus, of course, the animals.
It looks like the 4-Hers, their ani-
mals and fair-goers may be getting a
break from Mother Nature. After all the
hot stuff seen this week, cooler condi-
tions will be moving in with the start of
the annual event.
The National Weather Service says
mostly sunny skies and a high near 81
are on tap for Sunday, with highs in the
low 80s to follow through Thursday.
Some rain is possible, however, fore-
casters listing a 40 percent chance for
Monday and 30 percent chances for
Tuesday and Wednesday.
Sunday’s first activity is the tractor
driving contest at 1 p.m., then it’s on
to small animal judging at 2:30, the
Pork Producers supper and the Horse
& Pony Show at 3, the cat show at 3:30
and dog demonstrations at 4:30.
Stage activities will begin at 5 and
something new, a greased pig contest,
is due to start at 6. Ceremonies to
name Miss Adams County are sched-
uled to begin at 7.
(Continued on page 3A)
Cooling off for fair
Getting the show arena ready earlier this week
Some new
events for
this year’s
4-H Fair
The local extension
office says several new
events have been added
to this year’s 4-H Fair,
including:.
• Young McDonald’s
Farm, open from 3-9
p.m. on Sunday and 5-9
p.m. Monday through
Wednesday.
•Putt-PuttGolf,open
4-8 p.m. on Sunday,
12-8 p.m. Monday and
Wednesday, 12-6 p.m.
Tuesday, and 12-3 p.m.
Thursday; 25 cents for
nine holes, 50 cents for
18.
• Greased pig con-
test on Sunday in the
Livestock Show Arena.
Registration will be from
4-5:45 p.m., and the con-
test will begin at 6 p.m.
• FFA pedal trac-
tor pull in the Livestock
Show Arena on Tuesday.
Registration will be from
1-2 p.m., and the pull
will from 2-3:30 p.m.,
with the finals beginning
around 3:30 p.m.
• Bingo in the dining
hall on Wednesday; regis-
tration from 9-9:30 a.m.,
and bingo from 9:30-11
a.m.
• Kids’ fun zone on
Wednesday, 2-9 p.m., fea-
turing a bounce house,
face painting by local art-
ists, popcorn, sno cones,
and more!
Courthouse steps
repair work goes
to Hitchcock
By REBEKAH R.
BLOMENBERG
Dave Meyer, head of
the county’s maintenance
department, informed the
county commissioners at
their meeting this week
that a contract to repair
the courthouse steps
fell through because the
contractor was no longer
able to do it.
The commission-
ers approved Meyer to
award the contract to
the second-lowest bid-
der, Hitchcock Concrete,
which quoted about
$2,200 for the project.
Meyer also said that
the window recently
repaired in the Service
Complex held up nice-
ly during last week’s
storm.
He noted that the con-
tractor who had done the
window would charge
about $6,400 each to do
the other windows in the
building. The commis-
sioners asked for a more
precise quote before they
would make a decision.
Also at the meeting:
• Golden Meadows
reported that it has 13
males and eight females
in residence. It pre-
sented an application
for a 56-year-old female
Decatur resident to be
accepted, which the com-
missioners approved.
• Highway Superin-
tendent Mark Mitchel
reported that the Motor
Vehicle Fund is at
$1,076,389.82, and the
Local Roads and Streets
Fund is at $174,197.64.
(Continued on page 3A)
(Photo by Rebekah R. Blomenberg)
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 2A • Saturday, July 20, 2013
LocaL/State
AROUND INDIANA
CheCking
Depend on us...for checking accounts with something extra.
At First Bank of Berne, you’ll fnd exactly what you need
in a checking account, plus much more. Every new checking
account includes a lot of extras, like a free Visa Check Card,
free online banking and a great free gift. That’s the kind of
service generations of customers have come to expect from our
employee-owned community bank. Check us out and ask about
our really cool free gift offer.
• Free online banking and free bill pay service
• Free Visa Check Card
• Unmatched personal service
• Mobile banking
• Automatic text and email alerts
• Free E-statements
• Eleven First Bank of Berne locations and ATMs near you
Stop by one of our convenient bank locations today.
800-589-7848
www.frstbankofberne.com Depend On Us
Berne
260-589-2151
Bluffton
260-824-9982
Bunker Hill
765-689-9113
Decatur
260-728-2727
Kokomo
765-459-4171
Peru
765-472-1991
Portland
260-726-2133
Van Wert
419-232-2222
FBB_AdBerne7_13.indd 1 7/10/13 5:51 PM
Locally Owned and Operated Since 1986!
24 Hour Access Safe and Secure
Need More
Space?
Offce located at 2221 Guy Brown Drive • Decatur
260.724.3373
5 Locations To Better Serve You!
• 3303 S. Winchester St., Next to Schwan’s Distribution
• 1320 Village green Drive, Behind Courtesy Motors
• 615 Bellmont Road, Beside D&D Convenience Store
• 2221 Guy Brown Drive, Industrial Park
• 1740 Morningstar Drive, Northwest of Kmart
Please visit us at: DecaturStorageUnits.com
Over
750 Units to
choose from!
Discover the wisdom of nature.
You can rely on our knowledgeable staff for personalized, professional service.
We Appreciate Our Loyal Customers!!!!
Ask about our “E T Healthy Rewards Card”
Hours: Mon-Fri. 9am-6pm, Sat. 9am-1pm
260.589.3675 H Hwy 27 North, Berne H Since 1982 H 1.800.292.2521
Our selection, prices and service are worth the drive!
www.earthentreasuresonline.com H Like us on Facebook!
Vit ami ns, Herbs Grocer ies
Van Wert Cinemas
www.vanwertcinemas.com
419-238-2100
Screen 1: Turbo PG
Grown Ups 2 PG-13
Screen 2: Despicable Me 2 PG-13
R.I.P.D. PG-13
Screen 3: Pacifc Rim PG-13
The Conjuring R
VAN-DEL Drive In
FrI 19
th
- tuES 23
rD
100% DIGItAL
PrOJECtION •
We have 3-D Capability
ADMISSION:AGES 0,1,2,3,4,5-FREE /AGES 6,7,8,9,10-$5
AGES 11thru 62-$7/AGES 63and up-$5
Gates open at 7:30pm; showtime is at dusk.
July 19
th
-25
th
Offered in 2-d/3-d
COMING SOON: The Smurfs 2
The Wolverine 3D
All seats before 6pm: $5 After 6pm-Adults-$7/Children 11 and
under-$5/Seniors-$5 WE DO NOT ACCEPT CREDIT OR DEBIT
CARDS OR CHECKS! Sorry for any inconvenience.
Schindler
SEZ
By Jim Schindler
www.jamesaschindler.com
Schindler Sez
It appears as if the FBI hasn’t been able to dig any
up the dirt on Jimmy Hoffa.
Fish Stories
I’ve heard many a fish story,
About the one that got away,
And it’s a mystery how,
It gets bigger every day.
I’ve been on some fishing trips,
And to this I must admit,
I’ve caught a few of decent size,
But never Moby Dick!
—Jim Schindler
Bar None
The Indiana Excise Police arrested 80 minors in
a raid at the Early Bird Bar on the north side of
Indianapolis. Vicious rumors have it that the name
of the bar is going to be changed to the “Bar None,”
which does seem more appropriate.
The Crossing
We’ve all seen “Deer Crossing” signs along the
road; but I’ve never seen a deer cross there. Maybe
they’re afraid it’ll cost them a buck or a lot of doe.
Dreaded Words
The most dreaded words in the English language
are:
I’m from the IRS and I’m here to help you. Not
necessarily because there is a problem with your
returns, but because of their well-deserved reputa-
tion.
Fair Words
Fair words are as easy spoke as foul and bring
good will instead of blows.
—Howard Pyle
Hammond can
keep gun limits
Just can’t enforce them
due to 2011 state law
WET! — Cieara Wengerd carries Laithan Wengerd
through the splash pad’s fountains at the clock
tower in Berne this week. Good way to beat the
heat! (Photo by J Swygart)
By CHARLES WILSON
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
The mayor of a north-
western Indiana commu-
nity says he’s happy that
the city’s gun restrictions
can remain on the books
— even though they can’t
be enforced because of
a 2011 state law that
allows firearms on most
public property.
‘‘I just don’t think it’s
right. Bringing a loaded
gun to a park shouldn’t
be legal. We had an ordi-
nance saying that, and
the state law supersed-
ed it,’’ Hammond Mayor
Thomas McDermott Jr.,
told The Associated Press
on Wednesday.
Two Hammond resi-
dents challenged the city
ordinance in court in
August 2011, contending
that the local law barring
guns from city buildings
and meetings must be
repealed due to the state
law that largely prohib-
its local governments
from regulating firearms
except in courtrooms.
But the Indiana
Court of Appeals ruled
in March that state law
rendered Hammond’s
restrictions moot, so
they could remain on the
books as long as offi-
cials didn’t try to enforce
them. The state Supreme
Court refused Tuesday to
take the case, leaving the
appellate decision intact.
‘‘I’m not putting my
name on something
that says you can take
a gun in the Hammond
Civic Center. That’s
crazy,’’ McDermott told
The Times. ‘‘Somebody’s
going to get killed one
day with a gun in the
Hammond Civic Center,
and I’m going to blame
all these idiots that voted
for this law.’’
McDermott said he
would veto a proposed
repeal a few days before
the gun owners sued the
city. Shortly after that,
he issued two executive
orders barring city offi-
cials from enforcing the
ordinance, though he
still opposed its repeal.
Carmel attorney Guy
Relford, who has filed
several lawsuits involv-
ing gun rights, told The
Associated Press that
the decision nullified the
intent of the 2011 law
barring municipalities
from banning firearms
from most public loca-
tions, such as libraries
and parks.
‘‘By leaving something
on your books, you’re
regulating,’’ he said, add-
ing, ‘‘Somebody’s going
to read that and comply,
and isn’t that regulat-
ing?’’
Other Indiana cities,
such as Indianapolis and
Evansville, repealed their
gun restrictions due to
the passage of the law,
Relford said.
McDermott said he
was ‘‘positive’’ the NRA,
which urged passage of
the state law, was behind
the lawsuit. ‘‘We realized
very quickly that the
NRA was setting us up
for a lawsuit,’’ he said in
a phone interview.
A spokeswoman for the
National Rifle Association
did not reply to a phone
message.
City resident pleads
guilty to three charges
vices/substance abuse
education, a Responsible
Thinking and Choices
class, and to pay $738 in
court costs and fees.
For violating probation
by incurring new charges.
90 days of his previously
suspended sentence were
revoked, to be served in
jail.
Jason R. Mathews, 29,
Decatur, recently pleaded
guilty three charges and
was sentenced by Adams
Superior Court Judge
Patrick R. Miller.
For invasion of priva-
cy, Matthews was sen-
tenced to a year in jail, all
but 30 suspended, and a
year of probation. He was
ordered to pay $338 in
court costs and fees.
For possession of
chemical reagents or pre-
cursors with intent to
manufacture a controlled
substance and invasion
of privacy, he was sen-
tenced to 540 days in
prison, with all but 190
suspended, which have
been served.
Matthews also was
given 540 days of pro-
bation and ordered to
complete addiction ser-
flames after he pulled it
from the car.
The officer was treated
at a hospital for inhala-
tion of sulfuric acid and
gas after Saturday night’s
incident.
Baseball injury
at first not bad
UNION CITY, Ind. (AP)
— The father of an 8-year-
old eastern Indiana boy
who died after being hit
by a baseball says he at
first didn’t think his son
was badly hurt.
Erik Williams says his
son Dylan was playing
first base during a Union
City all-star team prac-
tice on Tuesday when a
teammate threw a ball
that hit him the boy in
the neck.
Williams told WISH-TV
he shouted at Dylan to get
up and that he should’ve
been paying attention.
He then went to pick
up his son and found
him limp.
Dylan was taken from
the city about 30 miles
east of Muncie to Riley
Hospital for Children in
Indianapolis, where he
died Wednesday of blunt
force trauma.
Williams told WRTV
that doctors described
Dylan’s death as a one in
10 million chance.
Pence has new
Facebook policy,
fresh criticism
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Gov. Mike Pence has a
new policy on Facebook
and other social media —
and it’s already drawing
criticism.
WISH-TV reports that
the new policy prohib-
its profanity, obscenity,
nudity and other objec-
tionable content.
It also encourages
users to be civil and
that political views and
philosophies should be
taken elsewhere.
That last part is
drawing criticism. Andy
Markle, who helped create
the website Pencership.
com three weeks ago,
says social media is a
public way for Pence to
counter opposing view-
points, but the governor
is using it as a way to
censor the comments of
Hoosiers.
Pence apologized after
respectful comments
about gay marriage were
deleted from his Facebook
page three weeks ago.
He promised at that
time to create a new
social media policy and
post it online.
Cop finds meth
lab in squad car
SYRACUSE, Ind. (AP)
— A northern Indiana
police officer found meth-
amphetamine cooking in
bag inside his squad car
after arresting a man on
a domestic disturbance
charge.
An officer for the
Syracuse police depart-
ment 40 miles northwest
of Fort Wayne noticed a
strange chemical odor
after taking the man to
the Kosciusko County
Jail. Thinking it was com-
ing from the jail’s intake
bay, he pulled out.
The odor got worse and
the back seat began to fill
with smoke.
The Journal Gazette
reports that the officer
said a nylon bag in the
back seat that he orig-
inally thought was the
man’s clothing burst into
Check out our
Classifeds
Decatur Daily Democrat
Saturday, July 20, 2013 • Page 3A For the record
Your Local Weather
Sat
7/20
84/64
Thunder-
storms early.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
mid 60s.
Sun
7/21
82/63
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.
Mon
7/22
81/66
Scattered
thunder-
storms. Highs
in the low
80s and lows
in the mid
60s.
Tue
7/23
84/67
Isolated thun-
derstorms.
Highs in the
mid 80s and
lows in the
upper 60s.
Wed
7/24
81/62
Scattered
thunder-
storms possi-
ble.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
From Decatur High 91 River 2.9 ft.
weather station Precip 0 (up to 3 p.m.)
Courthouse News
Marriage Applications
In Adams County:
Jonathon D. Amburgey
of Columbia City and
Hollianne Yoquelet of
Decatur
Jesse A. Hess and
Alicia L. Hirschy, both of
Decatur
Marriage Dissolutions
In Adams County:
The marriage of
Christine J. Lopez and
Francisco J. Lopez, Jr.,
both of Decatur, was dis-
solved.
The marriage of
Heather M. Reynard
of Geneva and Glen A.
Reynard of New Castle
was dissolved.
The marriage of
Fidencia A. Gase and
David A. Gase, both of
Decatur, was dissolved.
The marriage of
Elizabeth Morales of
Berne and Vincente
Morales of Portland
was dissolved. He was
ordered to pay $80 per
week in child support.
Civil Judgments
In Adams Superior
Court:
PNMAC Mortgage
Opportunity of Valparaiso
was awarded $462,813.16
from Jessica L. Baker
and Kim A. Baker, both
of Decatur.
Michael D. Beitler
was allowed to waive his
$1,595 reinstatement fee
at BMV in exchange for
220 hours of community
service.
Ed Yoder of Berne was
granted the eviction of
Brandon Liechty, also of
Berne.
Daniels gets a Purdue bonus
SAN MATEO, Calif.
(AP) — A teenager sur-
vived the Asiana Airlines
crash in San Francisco
only to be struck and
killed by a fire vehicle
rushing to fight a blaze
that broke out on the
plane, authorities said
on Friday.
Ye Meng Yuan, 16, a
Chinese student, died
of multiple injuries from
being run over by what
officials believe was a
special firetruck used to
spread fire-suppressing
foam.
San Francisco Fire
Chief Joanne Hayes-
White apologized to
Yuan’s family and said
she was trying to arrange
a meeting with them.
‘‘It’s very difficult and
devastating news for
all of us,’’ Hayes-White
said.
The family was upset
after learning the details
of the girl’s death and
wants the girl’s body
returned to China, San
Mateo County Coroner
Robert Foucrault said.
‘‘It was a difficult con-
versation,’’ he said.
It was unclear how
the teenager got from
the airplane to the spot
where she was killed.
Investigators believe she
was down on the ground
and not standing up
during the ‘‘volatile’’ and
‘‘dangerous’’ aftermath of
the plane crash, Hayes-
White said.
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP)
— Purdue University trustees
are giving school president Mitch
Daniels a performance bonus for
his first six months in office.
Trustees approved the $58,000
bonus following a five-minute
discussion Friday afternoon.
The trustees did not mention
Associated Press reports on emails
showing that while Daniels was
governor he tried to eliminate lib-
eral ‘‘propaganda’’ from teacher
education courses at Indiana’s
public universities.
Daniels has a base salary of
$420,000 and was eligible for up
to $126,000 in bonuses.
The performance goals for
Daniels haven’t been set.
Trustees chairman Keith Krach
praised the job Daniels has done
since he became president of
Purdue in January.
Most of Purdue’s trustees were
appointed by Daniels.
See earlier stories on page 6A.
By The Associated Press
AURORA, Colo. (AP) —
It is not a small club, the
survivors of the shoot-
ings at Theater 9.
The Century 16 audi-
torium was packed —
421 men, women and
children who had turned
out for a midnight show-
ing of ‘‘The Dark Knight
Rises.’’ When a bizarre
figure, helmeted and
clad in black, appeared
before them in a cloud
of smoke, they reacted
with bemusement and
amazement, shock and
confusion and — finally
— horror.
Twelve people died, 70
were injured, and more
than 300 fled into the
night and into the arms
of loved ones.
A year later, the sur-
vivors cannot forget their
terror, or the injuries they
suffered, or their loss-
es. But they search for
meaning, and sometimes
find it: the victims whose
faith has strengthened;
the father who lost his
son but found a cause;
the couple who believe
that the anniversary of a
hateful act can be trans-
formed by love.
———
Pierce O’Farrill was
sitting a few rows up on
the right side of the the-
ater when he saw a tear
gas canister fly in front
of the movie screen, fol-
lowed by the silhouette of
the gunman and a green
laser shining from the
scope of one of his weap-
ons.
‘‘My heart just kind of
stopped,’’ O’Farrill said.
‘‘I can still in my head
hear the (gunman’s) foot-
steps. Everything went
quiet for me.’’
A blast from a shotgun
hit him in the chest and
the left foot as he tried
to take cover. Moments
later, the gunman came
closer and shot him with
a .40-caliber pistol, shat-
tering his left arm. The
shot barely missed a
nerve that controls hand
function, doctors told
him.
O’Farrill, 29, still has
shotgun pellets in his
chest and a bullet lodged
in his arm. It aches when
he exercises or when a
storm is approaching.
Still, he said, as a
devout Christian — a
worker for the Denver
Rescue Mission — he for-
gives the man charged in
the shootings.
O’Farrill said he saw
James Holmes for the
first time in the hospital,
on television news.
‘‘When I saw him, I
saw a lost soul,’’ he said.
‘‘I saw a guy who was
lost and the darkness got
him.
‘‘Everybody deserves a
chance to be forgiven.’’
O’Farrill said he hopes
Holmes, if convicted,
spends the rest of his life
in prison — but that he
would even like to meet
him one day to see if he
is remorseful.
‘‘I would want him to
know that there are peo-
ple in this world that do
not hate him,’’ he said.
‘‘I want to tell him there
is hope in this world,
even in the darkest place
where he is going to live
the rest of his life.’’
That hope — and a
lot of counseling — drive
O’Farrill forward and
make him stronger.
He has begun to
play basketball and lift
weights again, and now
he has bigger goals on
his horizon. O’Farrill got
engaged July 2 and plans
to get married sometime
next year. Children, he
hopes, will follow.
He feels incredibly
lucky to be alive. ‘‘The
last year’s been a bless-
ing,’’ he said.
— By Thomas Peipert
———
When word of the
shootings spread, Tom
Sullivan rushed to the
staging area at the high
school parking lot. His
son Alex had gone to see
the new Batman movie to
celebrate his 27th birth-
day, two days before his
first wedding anniversa-
ry.
When he learned that
Alex was gone, Tom cried
out and embraced his
wife and daughter — a
moment captured in a
photo that ran on dozens
of newspaper front pages
and websites.
Weeping in the park-
ing lot, Sullivan realized
he had no regrets about
his relationship with his
son. Each knew how
much he was loved by
the other. They went on
guys-only Super Bowl
trips to Las Vegas, cel-
ebrating craps wins with
Jameson whiskey and
cigars. When Alex turned
18 and wanted to get a
tattoo, Tom got one too,
even though he admitted
the experience left him a
little pale and sweaty.
‘‘There were no
unspoken words,’’ said
Sullivan.
He laughs easily when
remembering his son.
He’s drawn comfort over
the past year from talk-
ing about Alex, and the
lesson he had learned:
We must appreciate what
we have.
He also has testified
in favor of gun control
laws at the state Capitol
and went to the reopen-
ing of the Aurora movie
theater.
The Adams County
Commissioners will hold
their weekly meeting on
Monday, July 22, at 1:30
p.m. in Room 100A of the
Service Complex.
Items on the agenda
include reports from the
auditor, county engineer,
highway department, and
building maintenance, as
well as a report on per-
sonnel from the Adams
County Park Board.
County Road 100 N
will be closed beginning
at 8 a.m. next Monday,
July 22, between County
Roads 400 W and 500
W., according to Adams
County Engineer Tim
Barkey.
Fleming Excavating
will be replacing the small
structure at Hoffman
Tile. The road will be
closed for approximately
one week, he said.
Additionally, County
Road 100 W will be closed
beginning at 8 a.m. next
Monday, between County
Roads 300 N and 400 N.
Jutte Excavating will be
repairing the deck of the
bridge over Borum Run
Ditch.
The road will be closed
for approximately four
weeks.
(Continued from page 1A)
He added that there are about six more miles of
road scheduled to be chipped and sealed, and then
his department will return to mowing and weeding.
• IT Director Landon Patterson presented a con-
tract for IT services between the county and the
city of Decatur. The city will pay $4,375 for June-
December, and then $7,500 per year after that. The
commissioners signed the document.
(Continued from page 1A)
The many 4-H exhibits in the Adams Central
School will be open from 2 to 7 p.m. Sunday, then
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday, and 9
a.m. to 9:30 p.m. on Tuesday.
One of the highlights of the fair, of course, will be
Tuesday night’s parade and the crowning of the 2013
Ambassador.
The candidates are: Lindsey Bluhm, Emily Brite,
Dusty Lee Gremaux, Ryan Hockemeyer, Abbey
Jauregui, Paige LeMaster, Casey Krueckeberg,
Meghan Manley, Adeline Minnich, and Christina
Stockman.
Courthouse steps
Cooling off for fair
Pre-Fair Activities
Today
6 a.m.-9 .m. — Clover Center Open
7 a.m.-5 p.m. — Livestock Check-In
7 p.m. — Battle of the Barns
Fair Begins
Sunday, July 21
Adams County Farm Bureau Day
9 a.m.-9 p.m. — Clover Center Open
12-2 p.m. — Horse & Pony Check-In
1 p.m. — 4-H Tractor Driving Contest
2-7 p.m. — 4-H Exhibits Open
2:30 p.m. — Small Animal Judging
3 p.m. — Pork Producers Supper
3 p.m. — 4-H Horse & Pony Show
3:30 p.m. — Project Interact Judging
3:30 p.m. — 4-H Cat Show
4:30 p.m. — Dog Demonstration
4-5:45 p.m. — Greased Pig Contest Registration
5 p.m. — 4-H Stage Event
4-H Volunteer Recognition
Final Year Member Recognition
Outstanding 4-H Member Awards
4-H Scholarships
Farm Bureau Tenure Awards
Jr. Leader President Recognition
Showcase of Fashions
6 p.m. — Greased Pig Contest
6 p.m. —Featured Stage Performance
7 p.m. — Miss Adams County
Monday, July 22
Bunge Day
8 a.m.-10 p.m. — Clover Center Open
8 a.m. — 4-H Rabbit Show
8:30 a.m. — 4-H Sheep Show
9 a.m. — Daycare Day at the Fair
9 a.m.-9 p.m. — 4-H Exhibits Open
10:30 a.m.-10 p.m. — Dining Hall Open
11 a.m. — 4-H Horse and Pony Show
Pleasure Classes
1 p.m. — 4-H Poultry Show
3 p.m. — 4-H Starter Calf Show
5 p.m. — Rabbit Hopping Demo
6:30 p.m. — 4-H Stage Event
Grand Champion Presentation
7 p.m. — Featured Stage Performance
Decatur Dance Academy
Tuesday, July 23
Adams Memorial Hospital Day
7 a.m.-10p.m. — Clover Center Open
8 a.m. — 4-H Swine Show
9a.m.- 9:30 p.m. — 4-H Exhibits Open
10:30a.m.-10 p.m. — Dining Hall Open
1-2 p.m. — Pedal Pull Registration
2 p.m. — Pedal Pull
3 p.m. — 4-H Horse and Pony Show
Jr. Contest Events
3:30 p.m. — Pedal Pull Finals
7 p.m. — Parade
After Parade 4-H Stage Event
Pedal Pull Awards
Grand Marshal Recognition
Outgoing Mini 4-H Members
4-H Ambassador Recognition
8 p.m. — 4-H Horse and Pony Show
Jr. State Fair Classes
Wednesday, July 24
Substance Abuse Awareness Day
8 a.m.-10p.m. — Clover Center Open
8:45 a.m. — 4-H Dairy Show
9 a.m.-9 p.m. — 4-H Exhibits Open
9 a.m. — Bingo at the Fair Registration
9:30-11 a.m. — Bingo at the Fair
10:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. — Dining Hall Open
11:30 a.m. — 4-H Goat Show
2-9 p.m. — Kids Fun Zone
5 p.m. — Jr. Leader Corn Hole Challenge
5 p.m. — 4-H Horse and Pony Senior Show
6 p.m. – 4-H Beef Show
7 p.m. — Stage Performance Razz M’ Jazz
8 p.m. — Adams County Has Talent
9 p.m. — Rabbits/Poultry Released
Thursday, July 25
8 a.m.-10 p.m. – Clover Center Open
9-11a.m. — 4-H Exhibits Open
9 a.m. — 4-H Supreme Showmanship
11 a.m.-6 p.m. — 4-H Projects Released
11:30 a.m. — Horse and Pony Awards
Noon — Horse & Pony Released
4 p.m. — 4-H Livestock Auction
4-H Fair schedule
TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — A
woman who was badly injured in
a tiger attack at a western Indiana
animal refuge last month is con-
tinuing to recover and plans on
going back to work with the big
cats.
Marissa Dub, 21, was hospital-
ized in critical condition after the
June 21 attack, but she is now
undergoing rehabilitation therapy
at a Terre Haute hospital. She still
can’t speak because of damage
to her vocal cords from when the
tiger grabbed her head.
‘‘She had a laceration to her
back, an ear laceration, her jaw is
shattered, and just a lot of trauma
to her neck,’’ her mother, Kris
Dub, told WTHI-TV (http://bit.
ly/12RKNPp).
Police said Dub was cleaning
an enclosure at the Exotic Feline
Rescue Center near Center Point, a
town about 20 miles west of Terre
Haute, when she was attacked
after she mistakenly left a cage
gate open.
Refuge workers sprayed the
18-year-old male tiger with a
water hose for it to release Dub
and then used meat to lure the cat
back into the small holding area.
Dub has been undergoing reha-
bilitation sessions several times
each day at Union Hospital. She
could be released to out-patient
therapy next week, her mother
said.
‘‘She’s doing great. Every day,
she’s stronger, better movement,
better balance,’’ Kris Dub said.
The refuge that was founded in
1991, and it now cares for more
than 200 exotic cats. The cen-
ter’s website includes a message
thanking the public for its sup-
port.
‘‘We are grateful to be able
to say that our keeper, Marissa,
is improving and is expected to
make a full recovery and that the
tiger is also doing fine,’’ the mes-
sage said.
Her mother said her daughter’s
life-long dream has been to work
with big cats and was relieved to
know that the tiger that attacked
her wasn’t euthanized.
‘‘She will be back there as soon
as she can,’’ Dub said. ‘‘She will
definitely be back.’’
Victim improving after tiger attack
Teen in jet crash
killed by vehicle
Commission agenda ready
Road closings to start
One year later
Survivors recall Aurora shootings
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 4A • Saturday, July 20, 2013 OpiniOn
The DecaTur Daily DemocraT
Ron Storey, Publisher
Bob Shraluka
Managing Editor
J Swygart
Opinion Page Editor
You go, Harry
By Donna Brazile
“This place has come to complete gridlock,” said
Sen. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana. “Something has to
change.”
Senator Landrieu’s statement is the most succinct
— and most telling — summary of what compelled the
U.S. Senate to meet in private for nearly four hours
this week. Something, indeed, had to change. The
irony is that only the threat of a change greater than
ending gridlock could force the change.
Turns out, what terrified the senators was Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid’s threat to change the
Senate’s rules so that instead of requiring a “super-
majority” (60 votes) to end a filibuster, a simple
majority (51) could do it. If Harry Reid hadn’t really
meant he would change the Senate rules by majority
vote, the Senate would still be embracing gridlock of
Obama’s nominees.
Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee said,
“This may be one of those moments ... where the
Senate actually acts in a spontaneous way and does
something.” Well, “spontaneous” only if a mad scram-
ble resulting from senators realizing Reid really meant
what he said can be defined as “spontaneous.” It was
more like, “OMG, Harry, you actually want the Senate
to get something done?! What’s the least we can do?”
Some of my conservative colleagues warned that
any changes in the rules that govern Senate procedure
could ruin whatever “comity” existed. My response:
Really? I think many of us would argue that few things
have more fundamentally threatened the institutions
of our government than the Senate’s abuse of its own
procedures over the last two decades.
Previously, Senate procedure was to use the filibus-
ter sparingly. From 1789 onward, senators felt that
a president should (by and large) have the people he
wants to run the executive branch. No one thought of
holding up the people’s business by stopping Cabinet
heads or important governmental bodies from doing
their jobs.
The change began during the 1990s under the
Clinton administration, when nine of Clinton’s
appointments were filibustered. Seven of President
George W. Bush’s appointees were filibustered. So far,
16 of Obama’s appointees were stopped from taking
office.
There were no filibusters of executive branch
nominees throughout the presidencies of Eisenhower,
Kennedy, Nixon, Ford and the elder Bush. During
Carter’s and Reagan’s presidencies, two each of their
appointments were filibustered.
Filibustering nominees has become a trend — per-
haps the norm — because the two parties are moving
at warp speed away from the middle of American poli-
tics. It’s not that senators felt Obama’s nominees were
incompetent. None so far has morally embarrassed
themselves or their loved ones.
Instead, increasingly ideological senators felt their
interests overrode the process of self-government.
For instance, the people’s elected representatives,
in response to the financial crisis, chose to create a
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. But some
Republican senators didn’t like it. And so they’ve fili-
bustered Obama’s appointments to head the agency
for over two years.
The first appointee, Elizabeth Warren, was unable
to take office because of the filibuster. She then ran for
— and won — a seat in the Senate; now she could cast
her support for a person to head the agency alongside
the same senators who wouldn’t permit a vote on her.
The agency’s acting director, Richard Cordray, has
finally been confirmed, thanks to Reid. It took only
two and a half years.
This isn’t the way the founding fathers intended
the Senate to work. In fact, the Senate pretty much
worked the way they envisioned until the 1990s.
Since then, it seems the minority must get its way in
all things. (That used to be called “blackmail.”) Both
parties have filibustered judicial appointees, proposed
laws, Cabinet heads, budgets — everything.
According to Reid, Mitch McConnell used the
filibuster 420 times. McConnell doesn’t deny it. While
majority leader, Lyndon Baines Johnson contended
with exactly one filibuster. The filibuster is supposed
to be a safeguard, a tool for a minority of one (if need
be) to stop a headstrong public push to disastrous
action. Instead, the filibuster has become a tool for
legislative tyranny.
Reid found a way, if only for seven nominees, to
stop the gridlock and halt the filibuster madness. He
was willing to use the “constitutional” (aka “nuclear”)
option and set a new precedent. The Senate panicked.
Better to temporarily abandon gridlock and obstruc-
tion than consider efficiency, compromise or legislat-
ing to “promote the general welfare.”
But don’t think the filibuster is dead. In 2005, rule
change was a hot topic, but nothing happened. In
2013, the topic returned. Yes, this time the senators
avoided the “nuclear option.”
But if the Senate doesn’t change its ways and play
by centuries-old procedures, Reid promises to use it.
You go, Harry.
Donna Brazile is a senior Democratic strategist, a politi-
cal commentator and contributor to CNN and ABC News.
New districts change rhetoric, behavior
of 2 Indiana congressional members
INDIANAPOLIS – U.S. Reps. Jackie Walorski and
Marlin Stutzman are Republican conservatives in
neighboring Northern Indiana congressional dis-
tricts. They have an ardent Tea Party base and
strong cred with social conservatives.
But their behavior shows a slight variation. If you
talk with Walorski for any length of
time, the word “bipartisanship” will
make it’s way into the conversation.
What did she learn from her time as
a state legislator that works well in
Congress? “The need to work togeth-
er,” Walorski says, “Bipartisanship.”
Going into her unsuccessful 2010
challenge to then-U.S. Rep. Joe
Donnelly (who won by fewer than
2,500 votes) and the 2012 campaign,
Democrats tried to portray Walorski
as a Tea Party partisan firebrand.
Stutzman has taken a stronger pub-
lic position on abortion-related issues, mining the Dr.
Kermit Gosnell story for publicity and writing about
his family history with the issue (his young mother
nearly had him aborted). Both he and Walorski voted
for the recent 20-week abortion ban bill.
Stutzman has taken a lead role in the farm bill
debate, successfully seeking a separate vote on food
stamp appropriations and the agriculture subsidies,
though there is virtually no chance it will pass the
Democratic Senate. There is less public talk from
Stutzman on reaching out across the aisle.
The difference is the political veneer rather than
substantive policy. In the 2014 Cook Partisan Voting
Index, Stutzman sits in a +13 Republican 3rd CD.
His biggest threat would be from a primary chal-
lenger, which doesn’t appear likely to happen this
coming cycle.
Walorski sits in the +6 Republican 2nd CD,
according to Cook.
Their election experiences in 2012 are instruc-
tive. Stutzman handily defeated Democrat Kevin
Boyd 187,872 to 92,363. Walorski won a squeaker,
134,033 to 130,113 over Democrat Brendan Mullen
while Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney
carried the district with 56 percent. Walorski had
a $1.878 million to $1.273 million advantage over
Mullen. Stutzman had a $960,000 to $42,000 lead
over Boyd.
While Walorski said she wasn’t surprised by her
4,000-vote victory, many observers, including this
one, didn’t expect a close race. The newly drawn dis-
trict had prompted Donnelly to jump into the U.S.
Senate race.
When it comes to 2014, most see Stutzman eas-
ily winning a third term. And Walorski? Mullen has
taken a pass on a rematch.
This nuanced difference between the two was
revealed by last month’s vote on the farm bill.
Walorski joined most of Indiana’s Republican
Congressional delegation in voting for the original
farm bill.
Stutzman joined Democrat Reps. Pete Visclosky
and Andre Carson in voting against the measure
that was defeated 234-195, with Stutzman joining
62 Republicans in voting no because he wanted to
separate the farm subsidies from the Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program (or food stamps).
They did so for very different reasons.
Carson called the bill “an affront to the character
of this nation,” adding, “This bill failed today because
it would irresponsibly cut $20 billion from the SNAP
program, shutting down food aid for nearly 2 million
Americans and removing over 210,000 children from
free school lunch and breakfast.”
Stutzman reasoned, “Hoosiers sent me here to
change the way Washington works and I’m pleased
that my colleagues have joined me in rejecting the
old path of business as usual.”
The entire Republican delegation backed the sec-
ond effort to split the farm bill.
Stutzman explained, “As a fourth-generation
farmer, I know first-hand how important the Farm
Bill is for farmers but I also know that farm policy
and food stamp policy are different.”
Stutzman explained, “This is not about taking
food away from children or people who are in need.
This is about a delivery system. And the delivery
system that we have in the food stamp program is
an expensive one. We’re seeing abuse from top to
bottom.”
It’s worth noting that since 1997, Stutzman’s
Howe, Ind., farm has received just under $180,000
in federal farm subsidies.
In the original farm bill, Republicans wanted
to cut SNAP funding by $20 billion over the next
decade, citing enrollment of 47 million as too high,
with many coming on to the rolls via other pro-
grams.
It comes as recent studies show 80,000 kids in
Central Indiana face hunger. In 2011, a Map the
Meal Gap study showed that 25 percent of kids in
Vigo County faced hunger, along with 28 percent in
Fayette County.
So this battle over food stamps comes with a per-
sistent 8 percent jobless rate in Indiana since 2008.
It also comes as Indiana congressional maps
drawn in 2011 have created much more conser-
vative and whiter districts. Most of the Hoosier
minorities have been pushed into Rep. Visclosky’s
1st CD (71.6 percent white, 20 percent black, 13.8
percent Hispanic) and Andre Carson’s 7th (60.2
percent white, 28.8 percent black, 9.9 percent
Hispanic).
The rest of the districts are all at least 85 percent
white, topped out by the 6th CD which is 94 percent
white, followed by the 9th at 92.4 percent and the
8th at 92.5 percent.
And district makeup and competitiveness changes
behavior.
The columnist publishes at www.howeypolitics.
com.
Brian
Howey
DECATUR DAILY DEMOCRAT
VOL. CXI, NO. 172, Sat., July 20, 2013
The Decatur Daily Democrat (USPS 150-780) is pub-
lished daily except Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day
and Christmas Day by: HORIZON PUBLISHING CO. OF
INDIANA, 141. S. Second St., Decatur, IN 46733.
Periodicals postage paid at Decatur, IN. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to the Decatur Daily
Democrat,141 S. 2nd St., Decatur, IN 46733.
Black Man 101
By TerranCe HeaTH
Are you familiar with
“Black Man 101?” Black
men never get to gradu-
ate from this constantly
changing and mandatory
course in survival and
behavior modification.
With the acquittal of
Trayvon Martin’s killer,
the Black Man 101 cur-
riculum has been revised
again.
The unarmed teen’s
shooting made millions
of African-American par-
ents realize that any of
our sons could be the
next Trayvon Martin. His
killer’s acquittal illus-
trates how the rules have
changed once more,
turning the clock back.
As a parent, I’m a
Black Man 101 profes-
sor as well as a lifelong
student. All parents of
African-American sons
must have “The Talk.”
We know too well the sto-
ries of unarmed African-
American men beaten,
brutalized, and killed by
the police. Their names
haunt us, their faces loom
in our minds, and we
imagine our sons being in
their sons’ places.
So we tell our sons
that, as young black
men, they’ll be held as
suspects and sometimes
treated as criminals,
even if they’ve clearly
done nothing wrong. We
tell them how to conduct
themselves in encoun-
ters with the police so
that they may emerge
alive and unscathed. We
steel ourselves for the
question that always fol-
lows: Why?
From the moment
our children are born,
all parents work hard to
keep them safe. You want
them to feel safe. But,
the parents of black boys
have to flip the script at
some point. We explain to
our kids that the world is
not a safe place for them
in ways that it is for
other people.
Black Man 101 stu-
dents once learned “Jim
Crow etiquette.” Their
lives depended on being
agreeable and non-chal-
lenging with white people,
even when whites were in
the wrong. Under no cir-
cumstances were they to
even appear to assume
equality with whites.
The acquittal of
Trayvon Martin’s killer
harkens back to those
old deferential rules.
We already teach our
sons to be “agreeable”
and “non-challenging”
with police. Must we
now teach our sons to
conform to some mod-
ern form of “Jim Crow
etiquette”? Just teaching
our sons how to behave
when stopped by the
police no longer suffices.
Just as in the bad old
days of lynching, they
have to behave a cer-
tain way when they are
confronted by anyone
vested with self-declared
authority.
Why must we now
teach our sons to defer
to all potential bigots
who come their way?
Yes, those bigots may be
armed and inclined to
start shooting. But why?
Last fall, my oldest
son got his first hoodie.
The moment he put it on
and pulled the hood over
his head, I saw Trayvon
Martin’s face. I saw my
son in Trayvon’s place.
He’s old enough to have
heard about Trayvon.
That led to an early ver-
sion of “The Talk.” At the
end came the inevitable
question: “Why?”
I held my son close. I
told him that some peo-
ple only see the color of
his skin and what they
choose to project on him
because of it.
It’s not fair. It just is.
The answer is as
heartbreaking to give as
it is to receive. It’s the
moment when a child’s
safe world is permanent-
ly shattered.
Now, having been
acquitted of killing
Trayvon Martin, George
Zimmerman not only has
his freedom back, he’s
got the gun he used to
end that young man’s
life.
As the father of two
African-American boys,
this is the stuff of night-
mares. “The Talk” just
got even harder to deliv-
er. We not only have to
tell our sons that they
live in a world where the
color of their skin makes
them vulnerable. We
have to tell them their
killer could ultimately
walk away a free man.
For our children, the
world is neither safe
nor just. That’s the ugly
truth.
Terrance Heath is
the online producer at
Campaign for America’s
Future.
It’s worth noting that since 1997, Rep.
Marlin Stutzman’s Howe, Ind., farm has
received just under $180,000 in federal
farm subsidies.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Saturday, July 20, 2013 • Page 5A
Community
Community Calendar
Premium Hardwood
Organic Mulch
Graber Lumber
Pallets Timber Mulch Hardwood
2828 W 500 S • Berne, IN
260 385 8925
Colored Enhanced
Mulch
by Graber Lumber
There is a Difference!
BUY DIRECT
• Home Owners
• Contractors
• Businesses
• Industries
New & Improved
Textured Mulch
Hours:
Mon - Sat 7-7
AdMate
• A NEW Advertising opportunity that builds
customer awareness.
• Informs your customer about your business.
• Ad frequently builds readership.
• Readership attracts customers to
your business.
• Ad runs 6 days a week for 4 weeks for a
total of 24 times.
Call the Decatur Daily Democrat
about AdMate
“You’ll love what we can do for you”
Be in front of prospective customers
every day for 4 weeks
724-2121
Kevin and Dawn
Buuck, along with Marc
and Enid Lapham, are
proud to announce the
marriage of their chil-
dren, Rachelle Amanda
Buuck and Ethan
Malcolm Lapham at
Zion Friedheim Lutheran
Church on June 15,
2013.
Rachelle is a 2008
graduate of Bellmont
High School and 2012
graduate of Purdue
University, while Ethan
is a 2008 graduate of
Fort Myers High School
and 2013 graduate of
Purdue University.
Rachelle and Ethan Lapham
Sense & Sensitivity
by Harriette Cole
Saying Thanks Is Always Appreciated
DEAR
HARRIETTE: I have an eti-
quette question: When you
go to a party at someone’s
house, a casual dinner party
with a group of people, is it
customary to send a thank-
you note to the host? Is a
follow-up call appropriate?
Or an email? I feel like I
want to reach out to say
thanks, but I am not sure
about what level of formal-
ity is appropriate. -- Unsure,
Tacoma, Wash.
DEAR UNSURE: Years
ago, there was something
called a bread-and-butter
note that people dropped
in the mail to thank the host
after a lovely meal together.
It is always nice to send a
handwritten note to some-
one to say thank you. That
said, it is not very common
these days for people to
send thank-you notes for
this type of occasion.
The expression of grati-
tude is the most important
point. The delivery can come
in different ways. Placing a
call the next day or soon
after is a lovely choice. You
can reminisce with the host
about the good times you
had. If the person is com-
monly on email, and if the
invitation came via email,
then an email thank you is
perfectly appropriate.
DEAR
HARRIETTE: I got into a
big argument with my hus-
band at the end of a lovely
evening, primarily because
he was drunk. Well, we
both had had a lot to drink
that night, but he got loud
and aggressive. Because
he was drunk, he did not
listen to me when I told him
to cool it. He didn’t do any-
thing to hurt me or anything,
but he was definitely loud
and out of control. We were
with another couple, and
it was embarrassing when
he kept going on and on.
It continued after they left.
I want to address this, but
am not sure how. -- Out of
Control, Racine, Wis.
DEAR OUT OF
CONTROL: Because you
and your husband had both
been drinking excessively,
you can start a conversation
when you are both sober
to set the stage for your
state that evening. Admit
that you had consumed a
lot of alcohol, and ask him
if he remembers doing the
same. Point out the good
experiences you had during
that evening. Then remind
your husband of how the
evening took a turn for the
worse.
Describe to him how he
raised his voice and the
specifics about how he was
aggressive. Point out that
your friends were there
and that it was awkward
to have him be so aggres-
sive in their company. Do
your best to remain calm
as you reflect on the way
the evening unfolded. Tell
your husband that the way
he behaved made you
uncomfortable. Ask him if
he recalls his aggressive
behavior. If he does not,
continue to remind him of
exactly what you remember
him saying and doing.
If you think it is possible
that one or both of you have
a drinking problem, consid-
er going to an Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting (alco-
holicsanonymous.com). It
is possible that the alco-
hol was the trigger for the
behavior that you so dis-
liked. Getting help for that
could help eliminate the
potential for such outbursts
in the future.
Wedding
Announcement
SATURDAY, July 20:
A.A., 7 p.m., (open speaker/discussion) Cross
United Church, Berne.
Fundraiser for Alzheimer’s Association, 9 a.m.-3
p.m., Cornerstone Youth Center, 19819 Monroeville
Rd. Barbeque chicken dinner for $7, silent auction,
and bake sale.
MONDAY, July 22:
Decatur Church of Christ food pantry, 700 E.
Monroe St., Decatur, 10 a.m.-noon.
CAPS support group, 6:30 p.m., C & C Bible
Fellowship, Berne.
A.A. Big Book discussion, 7 p.m., Decatur Church
of God.
TUESDAY, July 23:
TOPS Club, 10 a.m., Riverside Center.
G.E. Retired Women, 11:30 a.m., The Galley.
Families of Veterans in Need
of Adams County fundraiser is set
By JANNAYA ANDREWS
Families of Veterans in
Need of Adams County
(FVN) will host a fund-
raising Carnival and
Family Fun Day at Villa
Lanes Bowling Alley on
Saturday, August 17,
beginning at noon, with
age appropriate prizes
given to all who partici-
pate.
The carnival will be
held from 12:30-5 p.m.
and a silent auction will
be held from 12:30-4
p.m. Some of the items
that will be auctioned
include a $100 gift cer-
tificate to Eichhorn’s
Jewelry, an item signed
by actor Kevin Costner, a
football autographed by
the 2012 Chicago Bears,
and Fort Wayne Tincaps
ball-caps.
A live auction of
Adams County veterans
will be held from 4:30-6
p.m. Bidders will have
the opportunity to win
an hour of work from a
veteran for small house-
hold chores, such as
light yard work or home
maintenance.
Veterans who will
be auctioned off
include Josh Calwell,
Jason Walters, Tom
Conrad, Trent Norman,
Marvin Heimann, Fritz
Bultemeyer, Jared
Bultemeyer, Decatur
mayor John Schultz, Deb
Schevenius, and Tiffany
Trayner.
There will also be a
double elimination Corn
Hole tournament, with
the best two out three
advancing. Cost of the
tournament is $10 for the
adult youth age group for
those 4- to 12-years-old;
and $20 for those in the
13- to 20-years-old age
group; and $20 for those
20 and older.
Musical entertainment
will be provided from 6-10
p.m. and food – includ-
ing pulled pork donated
by Rodney Swygart and
cheesy potatoes donated
by Kip Pancake, and hot
dogs – will also be avail-
able.
In addition to the day’s
events, Villa Lanes and
Molly’s Place will donate
a portion of all sales
form the day to FVN,
and Andy’s Car Wash will
donate $1 for every car
washed on August 16,
17, and 18.
FVN began after com-
mittee chairperson Deb
Lambert witnessed the
difficulties faced by a
returning veteran family
member and his family
as they struggled to pay
household and medical
expenses.
Although he was a
veteran, and receiving
medical treatment, the
family did not qualify for
government assistance
because the man’s wife
was working a full-time
job. Lambert said when
she became angry over
the situation, she was
told “Don’t get angry.
Do something about it!”
That’s when Lambert
went to the Adams
FROM ONE VET TO ANOTHER ... Decatur Mayor
John Schultz addressed the crowd during last
year’s fundraiser Bowl With a Vet while commit-
tee chairperson Deb Lambert looks on. (Photo by
Jannaya Andrews)
County Community
Foundation (ACCF) and
the American Legion post
43, and a partnership to
help Adams County vet-
erans and their families
in need was born.
“The goal of FVN is
to help military families
in Adams County, who
have sacrificed so much
for this country, get the
help they need,” said
Lambert.
FVN offers financial
assistance to qualifying
veterans who are not
already receiving gov-
ernment assistance.
There is an applica-
tion process for r those
in need, and Adams
County veterans receive
top priority.
“We’re missing a lot
of other programs that
other counties have,”
said Veterans Affairs
Officer and retired Army
Command Sergeant
Major Fritz Bultemeyer.
“ ... The commissioners
are open to all areas of
helping, and we’re just
getting started.”
For more information
on the FVN program, or
to submit an applica-
tion, visit www.fovofa-
damscounty.vpweb.com
or call Lambert at (260)
706-1578.
Tyson Barhke (center) is pictured here with mem-
bers of the Adams Central baseball team at the
Coaches vs. Cancer event held earlier this year. (File
photo)
Friends of Tyson
Bahrke and family
to hold 4-H fundraiser
Friends of Tyson Bahrke and family will be selling
cotton candy, lemon shake-ups, and Team Tyson
wristbands Tuesday, July 23, at Country Corner Deli
in Monroe. Hours of the sale will be before, during
and after the 4-H parade, or 4-8 p.m.
All proceeds will go to benefit the Bahrke family.
Donations will be accepted the evening of the event
or at any time at : Tyson / Julie Bahrke, P.O. Box 44,
Monroe, IN. 46772.
Tyson is an eighth grader at Adams Central Middle
School who was recently diagnosed with osteosarco-
ma, an aggressive been cancer, and has been under-
going chemotherapy treatments.
SingleS and SeparateS
Support group created
The Arthur and Gloria
Muselman Wellness
Pavilion in Berne has
announced the forma-
tion of a new support
group, with Chaplain
Mike Wertenberger,
called Singles and
Separates.
The group is designed
for individuals experi-
encing the loss of a loved
one or have a spouse
who is living in long-
term care, or suffering
from dementia or anoth-
er illness. Members of
the support group will
form friendships and
bonds with others who
are facing similar situa-
tions, and gain the nec-
essary resources to help
rebuild their life.
The first meeting will
take place at 2 p.m. on
Wednesday, July 31, at
the wellness pavilion,
1201 Emmental Drive,
Berne. Non-members
and members of the
pavilion are welcome to
attend the free support
group.
For more information
contact Sarah Conrad at
589-4496.
DST thanks New
Haven business for support
The Decatur Sculpture
Tour (DST) committee
recently presented F.
McConnell and Sons of
New Haven with a cer-
tificate of appreciation
for the company’s finan-
cial support of the DST.
McConnell’ s named
plaque, “Going Back
Home” by artist Curtis
Delk Rose of Decatur, is
exhibit six on the DST
and located in front of
the Java Bean.
At the conclusion of
the tour this piece may
be leased at a negotiable
price or purchased for
$7,000. All exhibits will
be on display until May
2014.
The new DST bro-
chures featuring the 23
new stops on the DST
may be obtained at DST
map boxes, the Decatur
Chamber of Commerce,
Adams Public Library,
the Adams County
Community Foundation,
or any of the DST spon-
sors. The 2103 DST
posters are also avail-
able for purchase at the
Java Bean or Sunshine
Uniques.
For more information
on Decatur Sculpture
Tour, please go to the
website at: www.deca-
tursculpturetour.com
THANK YOU ... Wes Kuntzman, Decatur Sculpture
Tour Committee member and Decatur Chamber of
Commerce executive director, is shown presenting
a DST sponsorship certificate to Martha Doan of
F.McConnell and Sons of New Haven. (Photo pro-
vided)
Senior menu
Senior menu
Monday, July 22: Sliced roast turkey, poultry
gravy, Chantilly potatoes, broccoli cuts, whole wheat
bread, orange juice, milk.
Tuesday, July 23: Spaghetti & meatballs, green
beans, garlic bread, apple crisp, grape juice milk.
Wednesday, July 24: Baked fish, green peas,
Normandy blend vegetables, whole wheat bread,
chocolate pudding, milk.
Thursday, July 25: Hamburger, AMerican cheese,
chuck wagon corn, hamburger bun, spiced peaches,
apple juice, milk.
Friday, July 26: Baked chicken thigh, poultry
gravy, lemon & thyme carrots, buttered cabbage,
multi-grain bread, pineapple tidbits, milk.
Senior menu courtesy of Aging and In Home
Services of N.E. Indiana.
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 7A • Saturday, July 20, 2013
260-724-7212
5110 N. 200W Decatur, IN 46733
Courtesy Motors, Inc.
724-8525
1-800-589-5227
Hwy. U.S. 27 South
Decatur, IN
www.courtesymotors.com
Health Care Insurance
Home • Health • Auto
728-9290
318 W. Monroe St. • Decatur
www.kintzinsurance.com
For Information On How To Support
The Boys & Girls Club Of Adams
County Call 724-9128, Ext. 102 or 103
Jo|n the Eoqs 8 Q|r|s C|ubI
Youth Ages 6-17
• Computers • Gymnasium
• Teen Center • Table Games
• Table Tennis • Pool Games
• Tournamentsl • Board Games
• Arts & Crafts • Much More!
After-School Hours: Monday - Friday: 2:45 pm - 7 pm
Summer Hours: Noon – 5:00pm
Annual
$
5
Membership
Join Today!!
For more details on your local Club’s
events, visit www.bgcac.org
BOYS & GIRLS CLUB CORNER
OF ADAMS COUNTY
410 Winchester Street º 724-9128
The Positive Place For Kids
The Positive Place For Kids
Club Member Taylor is testing the ice cream she
made as Deb Mishler from the Purdue Exten-
sion Office looks on. Deb presents a program at
the Club called “Dare to Be Healthy”. Members
learn about nutritional choices and have partici-
pated in making their own snacks. Nancy Manuel,
also from the Extension Office, presents
“Captain Cash” a program on money management.
Thank you to Deb, Nancy and all our volunteers
and community partners for bringing wonderful
experiences to our Club Members.
Daniels is defended
by conservative group
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The president
of a group that champions conser-
vative academic causes says Purdue
University President Mitch Daniels was
right to object to the use of a book by
historian and activist Howard Zinn in
Indiana classrooms.
Peter Wood of the National Association
of Scholars defended Daniels’ state-
ments about what was taught in public
schools in a string of 2010 emails sent
while the Republican was in his second
term as Indiana governor.
Daniels wrote that he wanted to
ensure Zinn’s book wasn’t used in
Indiana.
He also asked advisers for ways
to ‘‘disqualify the propaganda’’ he
said was being taught to teachers in
training at Indiana’s colleges after he
learned Zinn’s book was part of a sum-
mer course.
Wood says Zinn’s ‘‘A People’s History
of the United States’’ is ‘‘trashy pseu-
do-history.’’
Want Daniels ousted
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Purdue
University alumni are calling for Mitch
Daniels’ removal as president following
the publication of emails showing he
tried to silence critics in higher educa-
tion and ‘‘disqualify the propaganda’’
at Indiana’s teaching colleges while
governor.
Society for an Open and Accountable
Purdue spokesman Aaron Hoover said
Wednesday that Daniels’ emails are
grounds for removal.
Hoover and other alumni protested
Daniels’ selection for president last
year by a board of trustees he appoint-
ed.
Calls for resignation
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A former
Indiana House Education Committee
chairman says Purdue University
President Mitch Daniels should resign
over emails showing the ex-governor
tried to keep liberal historian Howard
Zinn’s work out of classrooms.
Democratic Rep. Charlie Brown of
Gary said Thursday that the Purdue
Board of Trustees needs to ‘‘seriously
look at asking him to step aside’’
following publication of the emails
obtained by The Associated Press.
Most of Purdue’s trustees were
appointed by Daniels. The board reaf-
firmed its support for him this week.
Daniels’ text attack part of conservative push
By TOM LoBIANCO
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— Three years ago,
then-Gov. Mitch Daniels
directed his education
advisers to ‘‘disqualify
the propaganda’’ from
courses used for licens-
ing teachers in Indiana.
But his concern wasn’t
focused only on a con-
troversial history book
by Howard Zinn that
Daniels mentioned to
the officials, and which
has thrust him into an
uncomfortable discus-
sion about academic
freedom in his new job
as Purdue University’s
president.
Daniels’ directive, con-
tained in emails obtained
by The Associated Press
through a public records
request, was part of a
broader conservative
push to move the train-
ing of school teachers
out of the nation’s teach-
ing colleges.
At the core of the effort
are two beliefs: that tra-
ditional teacher training
produces bad teachers
and that schools have
been churning out politi-
cal liberals and undercut-
ting conservative beliefs,
in part by using books
like Zinn’s ‘‘A People’s
History of the United
States,’’ which empha-
sizes violence against
Native Americans and on
class inequality.
‘‘If one goes looking
for a part of the univer-
sity where ... you’re most
likely to find teachers
who throw caution to the
wind and propagandize
their students in favor of
some ideological point of
view, the school of edu-
cation is at the top of the
list,’’ said Peter Wood,
Mitch Daniels
president of the National
Association of Scholars, a
group representing con-
servative university pro-
fessors.
Most classroom teach-
ers in the United States
are products of education
schools, graduating with
a major in education and
minor in subject areas.
The programs teach edu-
cation methodology and
prepare students to meet
the requirements for a
state license.
Daniels and other con-
servative Republicans
maintain that teachers
would be better if they
majored in the subject
they would teach. He
wanted to create alterna-
tive avenues for people in
other fields to get teach-
ing licenses.
The arguments, bol-
stered by a June report
from the conserva-
tive-affiliated National
Council on Teacher
Quality condemning the
nation’s education col-
leges, are fueling pushes
in a number of states
for sweeping changes in
teacher qualifications.
But education pro-
fessors say the efforts
miss the point of teacher
training. Rob Helfenbein,
an Indiana University
professor who includes
Zinn’s book in a social
studies methodology
course for prospective
teachers, said he doesn’t
think Daniels and oth-
ers understand how col-
leges of education expose
teachers to different
views and give them the
skills to succeed in the
classroom.
‘‘I think there are a
lot more conservatives
than people would ever
imagine’’ in the educa-
tion schools, Helfenbein
said. ‘
‘This is an old, tired
argument the right has
often said, that univer-
sities are this bastion
of leftist thought. In my
experience, I don’t see
it.’’
In Indiana, Daniels’
concerns merged
with a longstanding
debate about the qual-
ity of education. Only
about a fourth of the
state’s adults have col-
lege degrees, and efforts
to boost performance
among K-12 students
have sparked sweeping
changes including a new
teacher evaluation sys-
tem and a system that
ties teacher merit pay to
test scores.
Daniels’ effort to
require teachers to major
in a subject area failed
after members of the
state’s teacher licensing
board raised concerns
about the scope of the
changes and the minimal
time they had to review
them.
Following that mea-
sure’s failure, Daniels
suggested the licens-
ing board be called in
for a ‘‘thank-you and a
spine-stiffening session,’’
according to a July 29,
2009, email he sent to
his education advisers.
The state then tried
to limit the number of
social sciences courses,
including those using
Zinn’s text, that would
count for credit toward
teacher licensing.
It also opened the
door to more students
who earned degrees in
areas like math and sci-
ence to obtain licens-
es. That effort failed
as well, but the rules
have been resubmitted
by Democratic schools
Superintendent Glenda
Ritz for public comment
and are expected to come
before the state school
board again this fall.
A similar effort suc-
ceeded in Wisconsin,
where Republican Gov.
Scott Walker last summer
said he expected more
teachers to flock to sci-
ence and math because
of new rules allowing
students who graduated
with a major in a subject
area to obtain teaching
licenses.
Daniels did not return
an Associated Press
request seeking comment
Thursday. A spokeswom-
an said Wednesday he
would not discuss his
efforts to change teacher
training. The publication
of the emails revived crit-
icism of Daniels’ appoint-
ment as Purdue’s presi-
dent, but the university’s
board of trustees has
reaffirmed its support of
him.
Daniels has said pre-
viously that he wanted to
ensure that teachers are
well-versed in subject
areas, and not bogged
down in education tech-
niques.
‘‘We cut from 36 to
16 hours what I’ll call
the methods courses.
It’s on the quaint theory
if you can teach math,
you ought to know some
math,’’ Daniels said dur-
ing a December 2011
panel held in Washington
by the Republican
Governors Association.
‘‘... Education schools, as
we know them, are not —
let me just be gentle and
say it’s not contributing
to the solution.’’
Critics within Indiana’s
university system said
Daniels and his aides
made a concerted effort
to drive students away
from the colleges of edu-
cation.
Gerardo Gonzalez,
dean of Indiana University
School of Education, said
the effort ‘‘was clearly an
unprecedented attempt
by government to inter-
fere with the university
curriculum.’’
VINCENNES, Ind. (AP) — A new
museum celebrating the career of the
late comedian Red Skelton has opened
in his southwestern Indiana home-
town.
Skelton family members took part in
a grand opening ceremony Thursday
evening in Vincennes on the 100th
anniversary of his birth. The Red
Skelton Museum of American Comedy
features memorabilia and videos about
his influence on early television and
comedy with his characters, such as
Freddie the Freeloader.
Valentina Skelton, a daughter of
Red Skelton, told the Vincennes Sun-
Commercial she is impressed with the
museum’s videos of her father’s old
TV shows and its display depicting his
dressing room.
Longtime Skelton friend and ‘‘M-A-
S-H’’ actor Jamie Farr joined in the
opening activities. Farr told WEHT-TV
he’s surprised Skelton kept so many
items from his long career.
Skelton’s widow said she was over-
whelmed by her first visit to the new
museum.
Lothian Skelton toured the Red
Skelton Museum of American Comedy
on Wednesday, the day before open-
ing ceremonies for the museum in
Vincennes, the Vincennes Sun-
Commercial reported. Thursday was
the 100th anniversary of Red Skelton’s
birth.
Lothian Skelton said she became
emotional touring her tour of the
museum, which features memorabil-
ia and videos about Skelton’s influ-
ence on early television and comedy
with his characters, such as Freddie
the Freeloader, on ‘‘The Red Skelton
Show.’’ It ran on NBC and then CBS for
20 years until 1971.
‘‘It was eye-popping for me, it really
was,’’ she said. ‘‘I’ve been so anxious
and curious to see it. I knew it would
be nice, but I didn’t expect something
as grand as what it is.’’
Lothian, now 75, married Skelton in
1973. They were married for 24 years
until he died in 1997 at age 84.
The auburn-haired comedian, the
son of grocer who died two months
before his birth, joined the vaude-
ville circuit at age 15 and went on to
delight millions with a repertoire of
helter-skelter pantomime and buffoon-
ish characters.
He always signed off from his TV
shows with his standard line: ‘‘Good
night, and may God bless.’’
Lothian Skelton said she believed
that the museum will help keep her
husband’s memory alive for future
generations.
‘‘Even if they didn’t know who Red
was, I think they’ll find him interesting
and creative,’’ she said. ‘‘These exhib-
its can be an inspiration to people. To
know that someone can come from
very little and make something of
themselves, that’s powerful.’’
The Red Skelton museum in Vincennes
Red Skelton museum opens
widow says she’s ‘overwhelmed’
Ahead of the Curb takes
home Senior League crown
Senior League Softball champions for 2013,
Ahead of the Curb Driving Academy took the hard
way through the playoffs coming through the
loser's bracket.
Eventually, however, the squad of girls overcame
Barker's in the semi-finals, then defeated Mind's
Eye Graphics twice on Thursday night to become
league champions.
Against Barker's on Wednesday night, Curb
defeated their opponent by a 13-7 score thanks to
a nine-run fourth inning.
The game was scoreless through three innings
when Barker's struck first with one in the top of
the fourth. Curb's nine runs put the visitors in a
hole they could not recover from. Barker's would
score four more in the sixth and then another in
the seventh but Curb scored four of their own in
the bottom of the sixth putting the game out of
reach again.
Lindsey Manley pitched seven innings for the
win allowing six runs on nine hits with seven K's
and four walks. For Barker's, Jordyn Knous took
the loss going four innings and allowing nine runs
on 12 hits with three K's and two walks. McKenzie
Funk pitched two innings of relief allowing four
runs on two hits with five K's and four walks.
Manley helped herself with the bat as well strok-
ing three hits including a triple in the sixth inning
and a double earlier in the game for a total of five
RBIs. Olivia Serna and Jessica Schaden (three hits)
each had doubles in the game, while Audra Geels
had three hits and Maddison Thrailkill had a pair
of RBIs as well.
Barker's stats were not provided.
Against Mind's Eye Graphics, Curb was forced to
play a second game due to the double elimination
format of the tourney with Mind's Eye having not
lost yet.
In game one, Mind's Eye scored two in the bot-
tom of the first but Curb led 4-2 after two frames.
The score was tied at 4-4 after two more runs from
M.E. in the third. The teams traded three runs
each in the next two innings but the final run came
in the seventh when Thrailkill stroked a two-out
RBI single for the game-winner.
Manley earned the win allowing seven runs
on nine hits with six K's and two walks. Jillian
Roth pitched all seven frames as well taking the
loss while allowing eight runs on 11 hits with two
strikeouts and four free passes.
In the final game of the season for both teams,
Curb broke open a 1-1 tie in the fourth with three
runs and never looked back in a 10-4 win for the
title.
After scoring one run in the bottom of the fourth,
Mind's Eye spotted AOC six runs in the fifth to
make it 10-2. Mind's Eye scored a run in each the
sixth and seventh but could not overcome the defi-
cit.
Schaden pitched the second game for Curb net-
ting the complete game win allowing four runs on
10 hits with four K's and four walks. Roth was
given the loss allowing 10 runs on 16 hits with a K
and four walks.
Serna stroked two doubles to lead the champi-
ons, while Audrey Blackmore had three hits. Sierra
Arriaga and Schaden each had two hits.
Mind's Eye batting stats were not provided.
Hometown, Hi-Way lead
Cross Creek men’s scores
Hometown Health Care holds a firm lead on
the Thursday night league, while Hi-Way Service's
lead in the Monday night division shrunk slightly
during week four of the men's Cross Creek regular
season second half.
The Galley gained some ground on the Monday
leaders with a 10-0 win over Abel Painting (14) put-
ting the second place team one behind Hi-Way with
32 points. Paul Baker Drywall (20) fell to Hi-Way by
a 7-3 score. NAPA (22) sits in third place after win-
ning a tight 6-4 match against Eichhorn's Jewelry
(21). Also in fourth with 21 points is Mr. Grumpy
Pants who won a 6-4 contest against Krave-It.
Double Eagle earned a 7-3 decision over WZBD in
the final match-up.
Luke Ainsworth and Steve Krull were in the par
or better category to lead the Monday pack with a
low round of 35 each. AJ Kalver and Tim Sutton
had 37, Dan Rickord and Shane Cauble each
shot a 38, and Brad Baker, Bill Lynch Sr., Phil
Summers, and Bob Ladd shot 39s.
On Thursday, Ideal Suburban (17) was Health
Care's latest victim after suffering an 8-2 loss to
the league leaders who sit with 34 points in the
lead. Shifferly Dodge (25) made up just a few points
in second place with a 10-0 blanking of Complete
Flooring (14). In third after this week is Ideal
Realtors (23) who won 9-1 against Stanley Steemer
(16), while Wet Spot Bar (20) sits in fourth despite
a 7-3 loss to Tritech (18). Norm's Preble Gardens
(17) took a slight edge in the standings past their
opponent this week in BCI Remodeling (16) after a
6-4 win.
Individually, Scott Ainsworth and Jeff
Bauermeister each shot 34s to lead the pack this
week. Jim Manley (35) and Tom Tussing (36) were
also par or better. Kermit Summers shot a 37,
while Todd Kiser, Mark Bixler, and Sam Baumann
landed 38s.
Youth golfers finish week
three at Cross Creek
This week, the Youth League at Cross Creek
challenged the golfers to an alternate shot event.
Now in their third week of action, two players from
each team were paired together and took turns
playing each hole. The youngest group played a
scramble this week.
The scores were averaged and points were
assigned based on the results. After the completion
of the event, team Old 27 was on top with a score
of 73 points. Just behind them was Zestos with
71, then Decatur Dental at 64, Thunderbird at 61,
Fleetwood at 57, Hometown Health Care at 50, and
Hoosier Pattern at 47.
Next week is the last competitive week of play
and the overall standings are very close. Golf
coach Kyle Eichenauer noted that next week will
be "important for players to play." He also issued
instructions for the golfers saying, "The kids
should remember that they earn bonus points for
age group scores and just for participating each
week helping their team's scores."
On July 31, awards will be presented.
SportS HigHligHtS
By Dylan Malone
Page 2B
Sports
Scoreboard
Page 1B Saturday, July 20, 2013
inSide
MLB—Reds 5, Pirates 3...Royals 1, Tigers 0...Cards 9, Padres 6...Cubs 3, Rockies 1...Braves 6, W. Sox 4
2013 SENIOR LEAGUE SOFTBALL CHAMPIONS—After topping Mind's Eye Graphics twice on Thursday
night, Ahead of the Curb Driving Academy emerged from the loser's bracket victorious and won the
championship 10-4 in the second game. The team is seen above (front row, L-R): Hannah Myers, Audrey
Blackmore, coach Amy Blackmore. Back: Audra Geels, coach Rachel Manley, Jessica Schaden, Marysa
Knudsen, Lindsey Manley, Sierra Arriage, Olivia Serna, coach Justin Manley, Madison Thrailkill, and
Morgan Tracey. (Not pictured were Erica Schaden and Jordyn Inskeep; photo provided)
Jimenez sneaks lead at British Open; Woods within a stroke
By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
GULLANE, Scotland
(AP) — Miguel Angel
Jimenez looked like the
only guy who was having
fun.
On a punishing day at
Muirfield — the course
with a reputation as the
fairest links of them all —
leave it to a 49-year-old
Spaniard who enjoys the
simple pleasures in life to
make such a demanding
test at the British Open
seem like just another
round of golf.
There was calamity all
around him Friday.
Zach Johnson lost
the lead with a three-
putt from 10 feet. Brandt
Snedeker, regarded as
one of the best putters
in golf, took four putts
from 15 feet. Tiger Woods
played well enough to be
only one shot behind and
rarely smiled.
Jimenez, with his
frizzy red hair bunched
into a ponytail, made his
way around Muirfield
with only two bogeys for
an even-par 71 that gave
him a one-shot lead over
Woods, Lee Westwood,
Henrik Stenson and
Dustin Johnson going
into the weekend.
What’s a 49-year-old
doing with the 36-hole
lead at the British Open?
‘‘Why? I have not the
right to do it? Only the
young people can do it?’’
Jimenez said. ‘‘Why? I’m
fine. We keep playing golf
and still get myself on the
golf course, and that’s
the secret. Enjoy yourself
what you do in life. That’s
what I’m doing.’’
For so many others, it
was tough to enjoy any-
thing about a course that
brought the easterly wind
for the first time all week,
and greens that hit warp
speed even after tour-
nament officials hand-
watered the putting sur-
faces overnight.
Woods went 12 holes
without a birdie, saving
his round with a collec-
tion of tough pars, and
he finished with a 6-iron
from 212 yards to 15 feet
for a birdie and a 71.
Westwood matched the
best round of the day with
a 68, while Stenson had
a 70. Both of them had
a double bogey on their
cards. Dustin Johnson
got himself into such a
predicament on the 15th
that his only option from
a bunker was to aim
sideways into the rough.
He shot 72.
‘‘Every hole is play-
ing hard,’’ Johnson said.
‘‘You don’t get any breaks.
You’ve really got to grind
it out. It’s tough off the
tee. It’s tough on your
approach shot and it’s
tough putting.’’
Phil Mickelson was in
range of the lead until
a four-putt on the 16th
hole, his second double
bogey of the day. That was
one hole after Mickelson
made a par putt that
would have gone 15 feet
by if he had missed.
Zach Johnson couldn’t
think of too many poor
shots he hit in the blazing
sunshine, except maybe
for a pitching wedge he
punched from 158 yards
that bounded over the
back of the 15th green.
He chipped to 10 feet
and took three putts from
there for a double bogey,
and he dropped one more
shot on the final hole for
a 75.
‘‘I enjoy difficult tests,’’
said Johnson, who won
the 2007 Masters in the
toughest conditions at
Augusta in more than 50
years. ‘‘I think everyone
does. ‘Fun’ ... you’ve got
to use that term loosely.
What’s fun about it is
that we don’t see this but
once a year.’’
The reference was to
links golf, though such
brown, brittle conditions
have not been seen at
the Open since Hoylake
in 2006, and the greens
there weren’t nearly that
quick. Mickelson said the
Muirfield greens in these
conditions were faster
than Augusta.
Jimenez, who was at
3-under 139, has his own
definition.
‘‘The fun does not mean
you have the biggest
smile and start laughing
all day,’’ he said. ‘‘Fun
is when you enjoy what
you’re doing. I play golf
and I enjoy it. And it’s fun
to me, no? Sometimes
you can see me serious
because of a situation,
but having fun doesn’t
mean that you are falling
on the ground and start
laughing.’’
Baseball returns
Page 2B
Decatur Daily Democrat
Saturday, July 20, 2013 • Page 2B
DDD SportS ScoreboarD
National League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 55 41 .573 —
Philadelphia 49 48 .505 6 1/2
Washington 48 48 .500 7
New York 41 51 .446 12
Miami 35 59 .372 19
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 58 36 .617 —
Pittsburgh 56 38 .596 2
Cincinnati 54 42 .563 5
Chicago 43 51 .457 15
Milwaukee 39 56 .411 19 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 50 45 .526 —
Los Angeles 48 47 .505 2
Colorado 46 51 .474 5
San Francisco 43 51 .457 6 1/2
San Diego 42 55 .433 9
———
Thursday’s Games
No games scheduled
Friday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers 3, Washington 2
Philadelphia 13, N.Y. Mets 8
Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 3
Atlanta 6, Chicago White Sox 4
Milwaukee 2, Miami 0
St. Louis 9, San Diego 6
Chicago Cubs 3, Colorado 1
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia (Hamels 4-11) at N.Y.
Mets (Z.Wheeler 3-1), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Maholm 9-8) at Chicago
White Sox (Peavy 6-4), 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-6) at Cin-
cinnati (Latos 8-3), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 8-2) at Wash-
ington (G.Gonzalez 7-3), 7:05 p.m.
Miami (Eovaldi 2-0) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 7-8), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Volquez 6-8) at St. Louis
(Lynn 11-4), 7:15 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 2-5) at
Colorado (Nicasio 5-4), 8:10 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 6-7) at San Francisco
(M.Cain 5-6), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 1:35
p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago White Sox, 2:10
p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Miami at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Francisco, 10:15
p.m.
American League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 59 39 .602 —
Tampa Bay 56 41 .577 2 1/2
Baltimore 54 43 .557 4 1/2
New York 51 45 .531 7
Toronto 45 50 .474 12 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 52 43 .547 —
Cleveland 51 45 .531 1 1/2
Kansas City 44 49 .473 7
Minnesota 40 53 .430 11
Chicago 37 56 .398 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 56 39 .589 —
Texas 54 42 .563 2 1/2
Los Angeles 44 49 .473 11
Seattle 43 52 .453 13
Houston 33 61 .351 22 1/2
———
Thursday’s Games
No games scheduled
Friday’s Games
Tampa Bay 8, Toronto 5
Boston 4, N.Y. Yankees 2
Baltimore 3, Texas 1
Atlanta 6, Chicago White Sox 4
Minnesota 3, Cleveland 2
Kansas City 1, Detroit 0
Seattle at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 8-3) at Toron-
to (Buehrle 5-6), 1:07 p.m.
Atlanta (Maholm 9-8) at Chicago
White Sox (Peavy 6-4), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 8-6) at Boston
(Lackey 7-6), 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 7-5) at Minnesota
(Correia 6-6), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 10-6) at Kansas
City (Guthrie 8-7), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Iwakuma 8-4) at Houston
(Bedard 3-6), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Mig.Gonzalez 7-3) at
Texas (Wolf 1-2), 8:05 p.m.
Oakland (Straily 6-2) at L.A. Angels
(C.Wilson 9-6), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago White Sox, 2:10
p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Seattle at Houston, 2:10 p.m.
Oakland at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Boston, 8:05 p.m.
Monday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees at Texas, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10
p.m.
Oakland at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
WNBA
By The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Chicago 11 4 .733 —
Atlanta 10 4 .714 1/2
Washington 8 8 .500 3 1/2
Indiana 6 8 .429 4 1/2
New York 6 9 .400 5
Connecticut 4 9 .308 6
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 12 3 .800 —
Los Angeles 11 5 .688 1 1/2
Phoenix 9 7 .563 3 1/2
Seattle 6 9 .400 6
San Antonio 4 12 .250 8 1/2
Tulsa 4 13 .235 9
———
Thursday’s Games
Chicago 75, New York 55
Phoenix 90, Los Angeles 84
Friday’s Games
Indiana 77, Washington 70
Minnesota 87, San Antonio 71
Connecticut at Tulsa, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
New York at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Connecticut at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Indiana at Washington, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Tulsa, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Major League Soccer
By The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Sporting KCity 9 5 6 33 29 19
Montreal 9 5 4 31 31 29
New York 9 7 4 31 29 24
Philadelphia 8 6 6 30 32 30
Houston 8 6 5 29 22 19
New England 6 7 6 24 23 18
Columbus 6 8 5 23 23 23
Chicago 6 9 3 21 20 28
Toronto FC 2 10 7 13 17 28
D.C. 2 13 4 10 8 29
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real SaltLake 11 5 4 37 32 18
Portland 8 2 9 33 30 18
Vancouver 9 5 5 32 32 26
FC Dallas 8 5 7 31 27 27
Los Angeles 9 8 3 30 30 24
Colorado 8 7 6 30 25 23
Seattle 7 7 3 24 21 20
San Jose 6 9 6 24 21 32
Chivas USA 4 11 5 17 18 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
———
Wednesday’s Games
Colorado 2, New England 1
Chivas USA 1, Toronto FC 0
Saturday’s Games
Colorado at Seattle FC, 4 p.m.
New York at Toronto FC, 4 p.m.
FC Dallas at Montreal, 7 p.m.
New England at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Real Salt
Lake, 10 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30
p.m.
Saturday, July 27
Columbus at Toronto FC, 2 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at New York, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
New England at D.C. United, 7 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Montreal, 7
p.m.
Chicago at Houston, 9 p.m.
Portland at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 28
Chivas USA at Seattle FC, 11 p.m.
Friday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Placed
OF Nolan Reimold on the 15-day DL,
retroactive to July 14. Designated OF
Chris Dickerson for assignment.
Recalled 3B Danny Valencia from
Norfolk (IL).
BOSTON RED SOX — Placed RHP
Andrew Bailey on the 15-day DL, ret-
roactive to July 13. Recalled RHP
Jose De La Torre from Pawtucket
(IL). Agreed to terms with RHPs Jose
Contreras and Brandon Lyon on
minor league contracts.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Sent 1B
Paul Konerko to Birmingham (SL)
and OF Dewayne Wise to Charlotte
(IL) for rehab assignments. Reinstat-
ed RHP Jake Peavy from the 15-day
DL. Agreed to terms with 1B Travis
Ishikawa on a minor league contract.
HOUSTON ASTROS — Optioned
LHP Brett Oberholtzer to Oklahoma
City (PCL). Recalled RHP Hector
Ambriz from Oklahoma City.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Recalled
2B Chris Getz from Omaha (PCL)
and RHP Kelvin Herrera from North-
west Arkansas (TL).
MINNESOTA TWINS — Recalled OF
Chris Colabello from Rochester (IL).
NEW YORK YANKEES — Placed SS
Derek Jeter on the 15-day DL, retro-
active to July 12. Selected the con-
tract of INF-OF Brent Lillibridge from
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Released
OF Brennan Boesch unconditionally.
SEATTLE MARINERS — Sent RHP
Stephen Pryor and OF Franklin Guti-
errez to Tacoma (PCL) for rehab
assignments.
TAMPA BAY RAYS — Placed 1B
James Loney on the paternity list.
Recalled INF Ryan Roberts from
Durham (IL).
TEXAS RANGERS — Optioned C
Robinson Chirinos and RHP Wilmer
Font to Round Rock (PCL). Reinstat-
ed OFs Jeff Baker and Craig Gentry
from the 15-day DL. National League
CHICAGO CUBS — Placed OF Brian
Bogusevic on the 15-day DL, retroac-
tive to Monday. Assigned INF Henry
Rodriguez outright to Iowa (PCL).
Recalled INF Junior Lake from Iowa.
CINCINNATI REDS — Recalled INF
Neftali Soto from Louisville (IL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Sent 2B
Neil Walker to Indianapolis (IL) for a
rehab assignment.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Recalled
RHP Fernando Salas from Memphis
(PCL).
SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to
terms with 3B Scott Moore on a
minor league contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS—Signed C
Samuel Dalembert.
DETROIT PISTONS — Signed Gs
Kentavious Caldwell-Pope and Tony
Mitchell.
UTAH JAZZ — Promoted Brad Jones
to assistant coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed
DL Armonty Bryant and DB Leon
McFadden to four-year contracts.
GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed S
Morgan Burnett to a contract exten-
sion.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS —
Released WR Donald Jones. Signed
WRs Perez Ashford and Quentin
Sims.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Trad-
ed CB Eric Wright to San Francisco
for a conditional 2014 draft pick.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CAROLINA HURRICANES — Signed
F Zac Dalpe to a one-year, two-way
contract.
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Agreed
to terms with F Drew LeBlanc on a
two-year contract and D Theo Peck-
ham and D Michael Kostka on one-
year contracts.
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS —
Signed D Blake Parlett and F Spen-
cer Machacek to one-year, two-way
contracts.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Named
Mike Foligno assistant coach.
PHOENIX COYOTES — Signed F
Brandon Yip to a one-year, two-way
contract.
WINNIPEG JETS — Agreed to terms
with D Paul Postma on a two-year
contract and Gs Eddie Pasquale and
Michael Hutchinson on one-year,
two-way contracts.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS — Fined Philadelphia G Zac
MacMath for violating the league’s
policy regarding hands to the face/
head of an opponent. Fined Chivas
USA $5,000 and coach Jose Luis
Real $1,000 for the team’s violation
of the league’s policy on mass con-
frontation.
NEW YORK RED BULLS — Mutually
agreed to cancel the contract of D
Digao.
COLLEGE
DELAWARE — Named Brendon
Post women’s assistant golf coach.
KANSAS STATE — Named Greg
Watson assistant track and field
coach.
LE MOYNE — Named Mark Dolan
women’s tennis coach, in addition to
his duties as men’s tennis coach.
LONGWOOD — Named Mario Huff-
man director of men’s basketball
operations.
TENNESSEE — Named Josh Baney
women’s basketball video coordina-
tor.
UTICA — Named Jim Kramer offen-
sive coordinator and Ben McKaig
graduate assistant defensive line
coach. Promoted Marcus Gurdineer
to offensive line coach and recruiting
coordinator.
REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL
PROPERTY AUCTION
SAT., AUG. 10 at 9 AM
REAL ESTATE at 11 AM
Go to wiegmannauctioneers.com
or call 260-447-4311 for more information
812 E. Tillman Road
Fort Wayne, IN 46816
Ron #AU08900060 Chad #AU19800036
Calvin J. & Lois A. Watson, Owners
Kevin Smith, Power of Attorney
Cindy Waldman, Power of Attorney
604 Homestead Ave., Ossian, IN
ROSE ANN HEIGHTS ADDITION
PROPERTY BACKS UP TO MAPLECREST PARK
3 BR 2 BA ranch, LR w/FP, kitchen w/center island, formal
dining rm, concrete patio, 3 season rm, finished 2 car att.
garage, 1,530 sq. ft., 2002 Buick LeSabre, 1986 Buick Park
Avenue, Husgvarna model 2554 lawn tractor, collectibles,
furniture & household, appliances, lawn/garden, exercise
equip, tools, Henry Miller spinet piano & bench
Aerial cameras to be
banned by NASCAR
DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. (AP) — NASCAR sus-
pended the use of aerial
camera systems Friday,
nearly two months
after a Fox Sports cable
snapped and injured
fans and damaged some
cars at Charlotte Motor
Speedway.
Ten people were
injured during the Coca-
Cola 600 when part of
the drive rope landed in
the grandstand. Three
people were taken to hos-
pitals, and were checked
out and released soon
after.
‘‘NASCAR has decid-
ed, in collaboration with
its broadcast partners,
to suspend all media
partner usage of aerial
camera systems that
hang over race tracks,’’
NASCAR said in a state-
ment. ‘‘The safety of our
competitors and our fans
remains NASCAR’s No. 1
priority, and until total
evaluation and analysis
have been completed,
usage of this particu-
lar technology enhance-
ment and any similar
enhancements, has been
suspended.’’
Fox successfully used
the CATCAM system at
the Daytona 500 and
the Sprint All-Star race
at Charlotte. ESPN.com
said Friday that ESPN
had planned to use the
Batcam system next
weekend for the Brickyard
400 at Indianapolis
and the Aug. 11 race at
Watkins Glen, N.Y.
‘‘We have an excel-
lent working relation-
ship with NASCAR and
totally understand their
position,’’ Rich Feinberg,
ESPN’s vice president of
motorsports production,
told ESPN.com. ‘‘We look
forward to beginning
our NASCAR Sprint Cup
schedule at Indianapolis
and televising 17 great
weeks of racing.’’
Samardzija, Cubs hold
on against Rockies, 3-1
DENVER (AP) — Jeff
Samardzija pitched effec-
tively into the eighth inning
and Anthony Rizzo dou-
bled home the go-ahead
run in the seventh, lead-
ing the Chicago Cubs past
the Colorado Rockies 3-1
Friday night.
Alfonso Soriano added
a home run, his 17th, and
Junior Lake, recalled by
Chicago from Triple-A Iowa
before the game, had three
hits in his major league
debut, including a double
in his first career at-bat.
Darwin Barney drove in
an insurance run with a
ninth-inning double.
Samardzija (6-9) kept
the Rockies in check
by limiting them to one
run on four hits in 7 1-3
innings. He walked three
and struck out six.
D.J. LeMahieu doubled
off Kevin Gregg to start
the ninth and advanced
to third on a ground out
by Carlos Gonzalez. Troy
Tulowitzki walked before
Gregg induced Michael
Cuddyer to ground into a
game-ending double play
for his 18th save in 20
chances.
REDS 5, PIRATES 3
CINCINNATI (AP) —
Brandon Phillips drove in
three runs with a bases-
loaded double on Friday
night, and Mike Leake got
the better of left-hander
Francisco Liriano for the
third time this season,
leading the Cincinnati
Reds to a 5-3 victory over
the Pittsburgh Pirates that
tightened the NL Central.
The third-place Reds
moved to within three
games of second-place
Pittsburgh. The Pirates
lead their season series
6-5.
The Reds sent nine bat-
ters to the plate for four
runs in the fifth off Liriano
(9-4), who had his short-
est outing of the season.
Chris Heisey’s infield single
drove in the first run, and
Phillips’ double off Justin
Wilson made it 5-0.
Heisey also had a solo
homer off Liriano.
Leake (9-4) gave up solo
homers to Starling Marte,
Andrew McCutchen and
Russell Martin in the
sixth inning. Manny Parra
fanned Pedro Alvarez with
runners on second and
third to end the seventh.
Aroldis Chapman struck
out two in the ninth while
getting his 22nd save in 25
chances.
DODGERS 3,
NATIONALS 2
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Andre Ethier homered off
Rafael Soriano to lead off
the ninth inning, and the
Dodgers resumed play
after the All-Star break
with a 3-2 win over the
Nationals.
Ethier pulled a 1-2
slider just over the wall
in right-center, his sixth
homer of the year and the
second ninth-inning homer
allowed by Soriano (1-2) in
three appearances.
Hanley Ramirez also
homered for the Dodgers,
who picked up where they
left off before the break,
winning for the seventh
time in nine games and
moving back above .500.
They were 12 games below
the break-even mark on
June 21.
Ronald Belisario (4-5)
faced only one batter to
get the win, his 14th con-
secutive appearance with-
out a run allowed. Kenley
Jansen pitched the ninth
for his 10th save.
PHILLIES 13, METS 8
NEW YORK (AP) —
Chase Utley, Domonic
Brown and the Phillies
came flying out of the
All-Star break, scoring
11 runs in the first three
innings on way to a rout of
the Mets.
Michael Young hit a
three-run homer, Utley
had a two-run drive and
Brown a solo shot as the
Phillies (49-48) won for the
ninth time in 12 games to
move over .500 for only the
second time this season.
Philadelphia roughed up
familiar foil Jeremy Hefner
in its seventh consecutive
victory at Citi Field dat-
ing to last season, includ-
ing a three-game sweep in
April.
While the Phillies have
made themselves right at
home in Queens, the Mets
keep struggling in their
own ballpark. Back on the
field after hosting the All-
Star game Tuesday for the
first time since 1964, they
fell to an NL-worst 17-28
at home.
TWINS 3, INDIANS 2
MINNEAPOLIS (AP)
— Joe Mauer’s two-out
RBI single in the eighth
inning lifted the Minnesota
Twins to a 3-2 victory over
Cleveland on Friday, after
an error by Indians first
baseman Nick Swisher set
up the winning run.
Four Twins relievers
struck out six over 3 1-3
hitless innings, including
Casey Fien (2-2) in the
eighth and All-Star Glen
Perkins in the ninth for his
22nd save in 24 tries.
Trevor Plouffe’s hit a
tying two-run single in the
sixth against Scott Kazmir,
who stifled them for two
hits over six innings.
With Joe Smith (4-1)
pitching in the eighth,
Pedro Florimon singled
and Brian Dozier reached
on an error when first
baseman Nick Swisher
let third baseman Lonnie
Chisenhall’s throw bounce
in and out of his glove.
Smith got Plouffe to
ground into a double play,
but Mauer followed with
the go-ahead single.
Bikers face Everest’s challenges at Tour de France
By JOHN LEICESTER
AP Sports Writer
LE GRAND-
BORNAND, France (AP)
— Half the height of
Mount Everest, climbed
on a bike, in a single
day. Even by Tour de
France standards, Stage
19 was hard.
‘‘At times, you just
feel like you’re being tor-
tured,’’ was how American
rider Andrew Talansky
described Friday’s ordeal
— arguably the toughest
stage of the 100th Tour
— that started with two
monster climbs as rid-
ers were still digesting
breakfast.
‘‘You’re just like, ‘What
is this?’ But you dig in
and keep going.’’
The GPS mini-com-
puter the Garmin rider
carries on his bike did
the sums: 14,498 feet
ridden uphill — close to
the height of Western
Europe’s loftiest peak,
Mont Blanc, and half of
Everest, the roof of the
world at 29,035 feet.
The riders also zoomed
13,907 feet downhill.
Talansky’s gizmo showed
he burned 5,670 calo-
ries during the six-hour
suffer-fest.
The difficulty of Stage
19 made Chris Froome
‘‘quite nervous.’’ Once
he got through it with
his big race lead intact,
the British rider finally
started to allow his mind
to fast-forward to the fin-
ish on Sunday.
Victory is so close
he can almost taste it.
The last Alpine stage on
Saturday — 77 miles in
the mountains towering
above the limpid waters
of Lake Annecy — won’t
be enough for second-
place Alberto Contador
to puncture Froome’s
cushion of more than
five minutes. In all but
name, the 28-year-old is
champion of the 100th
Tour and knows it.
‘‘One more day to real-
ly stay concentrated and
to stay up front and look
after the yellow jersey
and then looking forward
to taking it to Paris,’’
Froome said. ‘‘It’s going
to be very hard for some-
one to take more than
five minutes in 125 kilo-
meters (77 miles). But
having said that, I don’t
want to be complacent.’’
No, that can wait until
Sunday evening — when
Froome and the other
survivors of this three-
week, 2,115-mile clock-
wise trek around Western
Europe’s largest country
will clip their feet into
the pedals for the final
82 miles to Paris.
Traditionally, that last
stage is a relaxed lap
of honor, at least until
the pack hits the cobbles
of the Champs-Elysees.
Jeter back on the DL
BOSTON (AP) — New
York Yankees shortstop
Derek Jeter went back on
the disabled list Friday,
knocking him out of the
three-game series against
the rival Boston Red Sox
— and beyond.
The Yankees placed
their captain on the 15-day
DL with a strained right
quadriceps that he injured
in his first game back last
week after being out all
season with a broken left
ankle. Jeter rejected the
possibility that he returned
too soon from the injury
he sustained in last year’s
playoffs.
‘‘I don’t think that’s the
case,’’ he told reporters at
Fenway Park before the
series opener on Friday. ‘‘I
was ready to come back;
I came back; I was run-
ning fine. This happened,
but this happens to guys
who go through full spring
trainings and play a lot of
games.’’
The Yankees had waited
to make a decision, using
the four days of the All-
Star break for the short-
stop to receive treatment.
Jeter said he had hoped to
play against the Red Sox,
but he hadn’t tested his
leg in anything close to a
game environment.
Jeter, 39, broke his left
ankle in the opener of the
AL championship series
last October, then spent
the winter and the first 3
1/2 months of the season
getting back to the field.
After just four rehabilita-
tion games, the Yankees
pushed up his return
after Brett Gardner and
Travis Hafner got hurt.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Saturday, July 20, 2013 • Page 3B
Business
How Can Younger Investors Cope with Tough Times?
As Americans, we’re used to thinking that we will inevitably do better than our parents’ generation. But, for now at least, this type of progress may be facing some
roadblocks — and this inability to gain ground, financially, can have real implications for today’s younger people and their approach to investing.
Before we get to the investment component, though, let’s quickly review the nature of the problem. In a nutshell, younger Americans — those in their twenties and thir-
ties — have accrued significantly less wealth than their parents did at the same age, according to a recent study by the Urban Institute. Here’s why:
* Bursting of housing “bubble” — Many younger people who bought houses shortly before the housing “bubble” began deflating in 2006 now find themselves to be
“underwater” on their mortgages — that is, they owe more than their houses are worth. Consequently, they have less opportunity to build home equity — which has
been an important means of building wealth for past generations.
* Student-loan debt — The median balance among all households with student loan debt is now more than $13,000, according to the Pew Research Center — and
debt levels are much higher for recent graduates. It can take years to pay off these debts — and the money being used for debt payments is money that can’t go
toward building wealth for long-term goals.
* Wage stagnation — For several years, the job market has been pretty bad for younger workers. And even those with jobs aren’t making much headway, because
wages, adjusted for inflation, have largely stagnated for over a decade. Less income clearly equates to less opportunities for investing and creating wealth.
Still, even given these somewhat grim realities, younger people can help themselves build resources for the future and make progress toward their long-term goals. If
you’re in this group, what can you do?
For starters, pay yourself first. Set up an automatic payment each month from your checking or savings account into an investment vehicle, such as an IRA. At first,
you may only be able to afford small sums — but, over time, you may be pleasantly surprised at the amount you’ve saved.
Next, every time your salary goes up, try to increase the amount you put into your 401(k) or other employer-sponsored retirement plan. Because you typically contrib-
ute pretax dollars to your 401(k) or other plan, the more you put in, the lower your taxable income. Plus, your money can grow on a tax-deferred basis.
Here’s another suggestion: Don’t be “over-cautious” with your investments. Many younger investors, apparently nervous due to market volatility of recent years, have
become quite conservative, putting relatively large amounts of their portfolio into vehicles that offer significant protection of principal but little in the way of growth po-
tential. Of course, the financial markets will always fluctuate, and downturns will occur — but when you’re young, and you have many decades in which to invest, you
have time to overcome short-term declines. To achieve your long-term goals, such as a comfortable retirement, you will unquestionably need some growth elements in
your portfolio, with the exact amount based on your risk tolerance and specific objectives.
These aren’t the easiest times for young people. Nonetheless, with diligence, perseverance and a measure of sacrifice, you can gain some control over your financial
fortunes — so look for your opportunities.
This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.
Member SIPC
Chris Colpaert
Financial Advisor
813 N. 13th St.
Decatur IN, 46733
260-724-2444
1-800-755-4613
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Brad Martz
Financial Advisor
125 N. 2nd St.
Decatur IN, 46733
260-724-2348
1-866-724-2348
www.edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
401 (k) Rollovers Made Easy
To find out about 401(k) options that make sense, call today.
IndIana BIz BrIefs
Coca-Cola
struggles,
can’t get
a break Delta Faucet boosting production
GREENSBURG, Ind. (AP) — Delta Faucet Co. plans
to increase production at a southeastern Indiana fac-
tory and add up to 160 workers in the coming year.
Company officials say it will spend about $12 mil-
lion to renovate and equip its factory in Greensburg.
Delta now makes kitchen and bathroom faucets,
shower heads, toilets and other accessories. The
Greensburg factory also will make other shower
products and acrylic bathtubs after the renovation.
Delta says it expects the factory changes will be
finished by the end of this year. About 140 people
now work at the factory in the city about 50 miles
southeast of Indianapolis.
Long-term fix set for airport sinkholes
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP) — Officials hope work
can start next month on a long-term fix for sinkholes
near the main runway of a southern Indiana air-
port.
The sinkholes at the Monroe County Airport near
Bloomington were filled with concrete soon after they
were discovered in 2011. Airport manager Bruce
Payton told The Herald-Times that the new work
will have all soil removed to the bedrock in a stretch
that’s 1,600 feet long and the area refilled with stone
and other materials.
The project is expected to cost about $11 mil-
lion. Payton says if expected federal funding comes
through covering about 90 percent of the cost that
work could start in mid-August and be completed by
October.
The airport’s main runway would be closed during
the work, but its smaller runway will remain open.
State to employers: be sure workers safe
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indiana Department of
Labor is reminding businesses to make sure employ-
ees are working under safe conditions during this
week’s heat and humidity.
The Labor Department warns that heat illness can
be fatal. It says people working in the heat should
not depend on thirst before drinking water. It recom-
mends workers drinking five to seven ounces of fluids
every 15 to 20 minutes.
The department also recommends workers be
given regular rest breaks, whether the heat exposure
is outdoors or indoors.
Finally, for people working outside, the depart-
ment recommends that employers provide shaded
break areas. Shaded areas give workers necessary
relief from the sun.
Frontier ending service to South Bend
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — Frontier Airlines has
announced it will end service between South Bend
and Denver on Sept. 9.
Frontier spokeswoman Kate O’Malley told the
South Bend Tribune that the airline is ending the
flights because bookings did not meet expectations
when it started the service last October. Frontier
offered four direct westbound flights a week to
Denver.
South Bend officials say they continue to meet
with other airlines looking for new service and desti-
nations.
Bloomington bar facing lawsuit
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP) — A popular Bloomington
bar is mired in a legal battle that could cost it thou-
sands of dollars for not posting a fees notice on its
ATM.
A federal judge has scheduled an October trial
on a class-action lawsuit against Nick’s English Hut
that seeks damages for patrons who used the ATM
before a sticker was affixed to give notice of a $1.50
transaction fee, the Indianapolis Business Journal
reported.
The ATM didn’t have the sticker when Indiana
University medical student Jon Pike used it in 2010,
a federal magistrate judge ruled earlier this year.
That narrows the trial over the lawsuit — filed in
2011 — to questions such as how long the machine
had no fees notice and the bar’s legal liability.
Numerous businesses across the country have
faced similar lawsuits over the ATM notice require-
ment.
Congress eliminated the notice requirement last
year, concluding it was unnecessary, because mod-
ern ATMs allow users to opt out of transactions if
they deem fees are too high.
Nick’s co-owner Susan Bright said in a deposition
that she knew federal law required ATM fee notice ‘‘in
some way,’’ but believed disclosure of fees during the
transaction was sufficient.
The same Dallas attorney representing Pike in the
lawsuit against Nick’s sued the Indianapolis Indians
minor league baseball team and its ATM vendor in
2011, citing the absence of stickers disclosing a $2
fee.
Demolition of old bridge delayed
JEFFERSONVILLE, Ind. (AP) — Demolition of
the old Madison-Milton Bridge liking Indiana and
Kentucky over the Ohio River has been delayed.
Highway officials from the two states said Tuesday
that the first explosion on the 700-foot span has been
delayed because of predictions of high water levels
and swift current on the Ohio River.
The blast is now scheduled for next Monday morn-
ing, depending on weather and river conditions. The
new $100 million Ohio River bridge will link Madison,
Ind., and Milton, Ky.
Firm that cleaned sheen not to blame
MUNSTER, Ind. (AP) — A federal report on an oil
sheen on a major drainage ditch in northwestern
Indiana found that an excavating company that vol-
untarily cleaned it up was not responsible for it.
The Times of Munster reports that the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency found oil from the
R.A. Oros facility in Munster did not match the oil in
the sheen found in the Cady Marsh Ditch in April.
The sheen was reported April 10. Investigators
from the Lake County Hazardous Materials Team
and the Lake Ridge Fire Department inspected R.A.
Oros Inc. and discovered a sheen flowing from leak-
ing totes.
A police report was filed and the company was
instructed to place pads and a boom near the storm
sewer. The EPA said the company then decided to
conduct the cleanup.
Rendering provided
by Flaherty & Collins
Properties
28-story tower planned for
ex-Market Square Arena site
Yahoo earnings rise, revenue sinks
By TOM DAVIES
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Plans for
a curved 28-story glass tower with
apartments and retail shops were
announced Tuesday for the downtown
Indianapolis site that’s been a park-
ing lot since Market Square Arena was
torn down 12 years ago.
City officials and developer Flaherty
& Collins Properties unveiled designs
for the $81 million project that will
cover the northern part of Market
Square’s two-block footprint.
The tower is to have ground-floor
retail space, 300 apartments and a 500-
space parking garage. Construction is
expected to start next spring and be
completed in late 2015.
Mayor Greg Ballard said he believed
the tower would help attract new resi-
dents to the city.
‘‘This project is going to do much
more than just add another building
to our skyline,’’ Ballard said. ‘‘This is
really an announcement that reinforc-
es that Indy is a great place to live and
we have whatever type of housing you
want.’’
Previous attempts by officials in
2004 and 2007 to redevelop the city-
owned site fell through before con-
struction ever started. Plans for high-
rise condominium buildings stalled in
part because developers weren’t able
to sell enough units in order to begin
work.
The tower was selected from among
five proposals made by developers to
the city, which has agreed to contrib-
ute nearly $18 million from property
taxes generated by the project.
The one- and two-bedroom apart-
ments in the tower are to have floor-
to-ceiling windows and balconies, with
rents expected to range from $1,300 to
$2,400 a month. The tower would be
about the same height as the nearby
City-County Building and be among
about the dozen tallest downtown
buildings.
David Flaherty, the CEO of Flaherty
& Collins Properties, said the tower’s
design will make a ‘‘bold statement’’ for
the city.
‘‘As you come into our city from the
north, the south or the east, this is one
of the main things that you’ll see,’’ he
said.
Market Square Arena was the home
of the NBA’s Indiana Pacers for 25
years and was the site of Elvis Presley’s
final concert before his death in 1977.
It was demolished in 2001 following the
construction of Conseco Fieldhouse.
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Yahoo’s
second-quarter results didn’t give
investors a reason to celebrate the
completion of CEO Marissa Mayer’s
first year running the Internet com-
pany.
The numbers showed Yahoo Inc.’s
earnings are still rising, but they
also highlighted the challenges facing
the Sunnyvale, Calif. company as it
loses ground to rivals Google Inc. and
Facebook Inc. in the online advertising
market that generates most of their
revenue.
Wall Street focused on Yahoo’s rev-
enue problems instead of its earnings
gains. The company’s stock dipped 48
cents, or nearly 2 percent, to $26.45 in
extended trading after the report came
out.
Despite that downturn, Yahoo’s
shares have surged nearly 70 percent
since Mayer defected from a top job at
Google to attempt a turnaround at one
of the Internet’s best-known brands.
But Yahoo’s stock has largely been
propelled by a steadily appreciating
investment in Alibaba, a fast-growing
Internet company in China, made eight
long years ago.
Yahoo reaped a $7.6 billion wind-
fall from selling nearly half its stake
back to Alibaba Group last year and is
expected to bring in even more money
when it divests the rest of its holdings
in the Chinese company.
By CANDICE CHOI
AP Food Industry Writer
NEW YORK (AP) —
Coca-Cola is struggling
to sell more soda in the
U.S., and it can’t seem to
catch a break.
The world’s largest bev-
erage maker on Tuesday
blamed a confluence of
factors including unusu-
ally bad weather for its
disappointing second-
quarter results. It cited
cold, wet conditions at
home and flooding in
parts of Europe for weak
volume growth globally.
Profit declined 4 percent.
The temporary set-
backs clouded the under-
lying challenge the com-
pany faces in North
America and other devel-
oped markets, where
soda consumption has
been declining for years
amid criticism that sug-
ary drinks fuel obesity
rates.
In the latest quarter,
for example, Coca-Cola
said soda volume in
North America fell 4 per-
cent. But the figure has
declined in 20 of the 26
quarters since the start
of 2007, including a 2
percent slide a year ago.
It was flat in four quar-
ters and rose by just 1
percent in the other two
quarters.
Still, executives
expressed confidence
they’d be able to return
to growth with greater
investments in market-
ing, new packaging and
other tactics.
‘‘I hate to use the weath-
er, but a lot of it was the
weather,’’ Chief Financial
Officer Gary Fayard said
in an interview on CNBC,
apparently acknowledg-
ing the frequency with
which companies cite the
weather when they deliv-
er disappointing results.
When asked if people
drink less soda when it’s
cold and wet outside,
Fayard said that was
indeed the case.
‘‘We are an indus-
try that’s susceptible to
weather,’’ he said.
Over the past year, the
company’s stock is up
more than 5 percent.
Classifieds
Page 4B • Saturday, July 20, 2013
Decatur Daily Democrat
Adoption
ADOPT- Arms
filled with love, se-
curity and complete
devotion await your
child. Let us help
each other. Ex-
penses paid.
Please contact Su-
zanne anytime
1-877-473-5021
www.suzannesa-
dopting.com
ADOPT- Hoping to
share our hearts
and home with a
newborn baby.
Loving, nurturing
home for your
baby. Expenses
paid. Married cou-
ple Walt/Gina
1-800-315-6957
ADOPTION:-- A fi-
nancially secure
family, Love &
Laughter, Fashion
Exec yearns for 1st
baby. Expenses
paid. Claudine:
1-800-989-8921
Automotives
For Sale
GUARANTEED
TOP DOLLAR
FOR JUNK CARS,
TRUCKS & VANS
CALL JACK @
260-466-8689
INDIANA AUTO
AUCTION, INC.--
Huge Repo Sale
Thursday, July
25th. Over 100 re-
possessed units for
sale. Cash only.
$500 deposit per
person required.
Register
8am-9:30am to bid.
No public entry af-
ter 9:30am. All ve-
hicles sold AS IS!
4425 W. Washing-
ton Center Road,
Fort Wayne. (A)
OPEN TO THE
PUBLIC-- General
Services Admin-
istration (GSA)
Sale. Aug. 22nd,
1pm. All units sold
AS IS. View vehi-
cles in person on
Aug. 21st, 10am
until 5pm and Aug.
22nd, 10am-1pm.
View up to date list-
ing at:
www.indianauto-
auction.net or
www.autoauctions.
gsa.gov. (A)
Apartments
For Rent
2 Bedroom Apart-
ment, Range, Re-
frigerator, AC,
Laundry hook up,
Reasonable Utili-
ties, Off Street
Parking. Call
260-223-4949
2 Bedroom apart-
ment, upstairs, nice
& clean. $350.00/
month, deposit re-
quired. NO PETS.
Call 724-7014 or
223-4582
2 Bedroom Up-
stairs Apartment,
appliances in-
cluded,
washer/dryer
hook-up, Deposit,
references re-
quired. $340-pre-
pay discount avail-
able. 260-724-4000
FOR RENT 2-bed-
room apartment
w/appliances. All
Carpeted, Nice Lo-
cation. Available
now. References &
Deposit required.
$355.00 month.
PRESTIGE
REALTY
260-724-7023.
IMMEDIATE OC-
CUPANCY with ap-
proved application.
Rental assistance
may be available.
Country Brook
apartments have 1
& 2 bedrooms with
on-site laundry and
24 hour emergency
maintenance. Call
260-724-
4616/TDD#
800-743-3333 or
stop by our rental
office at 522 S 13th
St. in Decatur.
EHO
NEW RENT SPE-
CIAL! 17th Street
apartments now
available. Spa-
cious 2 bedroom
apartment homes
with 1 bath and all
appliances includ-
ing a full size
washer & dryer,
many recently re-
modeled, for just
$385/month for the
ground level and
$345/balcony. De-
posit special of
$250. Call (260)
724-4616 or stop
by 522 S. 13th St.
for more informa-
tion. EHO
Property
For Rent
2 bedroom home
for rent
215 E 300 N
$450/mo, renter
pays
utilities/trash/lawn
maintenance, no
pets.
260-223-0780
2 Bedroom house
127 N 9th St, Re-
frigerator & stove
furnished. $500 de-
posit $500 1st
month rent due at
signing. 1 year
lease call
260-701-2142
Property
For Sale
1620 NW State
Road 116-90, Mar-
kle
8.5 acres, insulat-
ing concrete form
construction, over
10,000 sqft count-
ing the basement,
priced in the $600’s
11124 State Road
101, Monroeville
1.9 acres, 3 bed-
rooms, lots of out-
buildings, priced in
the $150’s
2291 E. US 224,
Ossian
1.66 acres, 22x24
attached garage,
tons of space,
priced in the $140’s
Coldwell Bankers
Roth Wehrly Gra-
ber
Zoda Real Estate
Group
724-8000
Ronda Cowans
260-223-2309(cell)
Andy Zoda
260-413-7468
(cell)
Berne--2 duplexes
in town, nice loca-
tion, low mainte-
nance, must sell
due to health.
For information &
appointment call
260-925-6876
FOR SALE--
House in Hawk’s
Nest, Hoagland, In-
diana is for sale.
Please call
260-749-0553
NICE LIKE NEW
VILLA on the
Meadows of Cross
Creek. Ditch the
lawn care and
snow removal and
move out to this 2
bedroom 2 full bath
villa. Call Jason
Kreigh to schedule
your private show-
ing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St.
Jason M. Kreigh
Sales Associate
Cell 413-1446
PRICED TO SELL!
Come and see this
small 3-bedroom,
1.5 bath home on a
great county lot.
Features include
central air, new
plumbing in bath-
rooms, and over 1
acre. Call Jason
Kreigh Today!
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St
Jason M. Kreigh
Sales Associate
Cell 413-1446
The Stratford
*1,778 SF *Cus-
tom Cabinets
*Very spacious
kitchen w/island
*House wrap *30
year shingles
*Partial brick from
w/address stone
*Concrete drive -
Patio - Sidewalks
*Microwave
*Rounded drywall
corners
* 2.5 baths
*95% eff. Trane
Furnace
*13 seer AC
*10 yr. Warranty
*Spanish Lace
ceilings
*Dishwasher - Dis-
posal
*Cathedral ceiling
*Landscaping
Call Mark Bixler at
724-9131 or
301-6145
WELL CARED
FOR HOME. Home
features: oak
woodwork through-
out, basement, ga-
rage with additional
second floor stor-
age. Home also
features third floor
storage. Outdoor
8x10 storage shed
is not included in
the price. Call Ja-
son Kreigh.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St.
Jason M. Kreigh
Sales Associate
Cell 413-1446
Miscellaneous
For Sale
Handicap ramp
$200, shower chair
$35, adjustable bed
rails $125, solid
oak straightback
chair $38
419-605-8614
Appliances
For Sale
All GE refrigerators
& freezers, Now on
Sale!
All GE Gas/Electric
ranges now at
summer sizzling
prices!
All GE washers &
dryers now at sum-
mer sizzling prices!
Klenk’s Sales &
Service
1125 Southampton
Dr.
Decatur, IN
724-7623
Pets/Supplies
Storage
8 Free Kittens
North Decatur area
260-728-2891
FREE FOOD
WITH
EVERY--puppy
sold before
7/27/14. Poms, Do-
bes, Chihuahuas,
Morkies, Shihtzus,
more! Garwick’s
The Pet People
419-795-5711
garwicksthepet-
people.com. (A)
Garage Sale
1010 Mercer Ave
Fri & Sat 8-1
Cordless tools,
hand tools & re-
lated items, dvd’s,
ps3 and games,
household items
10281 N 100 W
Fri-Sat 8-4
Boys-girls clothes
5-14, tools and
more, priport
jp-1230 copy ma-
chine with cabinet,
boxes of ink, rolled
paper
1358 Champions
Pointe Saturday
only July 20 8-1
Brahmin cross-
body leather Coach
purse, old doll
house, Lee Middle-
ton baby fountain,
much more
1405 N 2nd St
Fri 8-5 Sat 8-3
Rain date Sun
12-3
Huge 3 family &
The Craft Shack
yard sale!
Too many items to
mention, something
for everyone!
5576 N 300 E
(Piqua Rd south
past Lake Shores,
1st rural rd, left, 1/2
mile)
Namebrand, all
seasons, boys 3t-7,
girls 10-16, tap/bal-
let, mens/womens,
Powerwheels, Little
Tykes, Fisher Price
toys, Littlest Pet
Shop, head/foot
board, LH golf
clubs, custom
wheels, home de-
cor and more!
Estate/Barn Sale
10195 N 200 E &
10150 N 200 E
Lots of furniture,
little girls dream
sale- Barbies, ba-
bies and dress up
clothes, Vera Brad-
ley purses, animal
cages, model
trains, games,
portacrib, drafting
table, countertop
window, baby
gates.
Way too much to
list! Worth the
drive!
Moving/Garage
Sale
4300 W 500 N
(near Peterson) Fri-
day and Saturday
8am-3pm
Antiques, collecti-
bles, furniture,
home decor, may-
tag washer & dryer,
books, dishes, lin-
ens, clown collec-
tion, generator,
snowblower, 5hp
fishing motor, shot-
gun, etc.
Yard Sale
715 W 200 N
Fri 7/19 9-7
Sat 7/20 8-2
Dining room table
& chairs, 2 wing-
back chairs, enter-
tainment center,
end tables, lamps,
dresser, phone
stand, shower
chair, sewing ma-
chine cabinet
Employment
Wanted
Wanted-construc-
tion work,
interior-exterior re-
modeling, roofing,
siding, windows
and doors, restore
old barns, concrete
Reasonable rates
260-440-7140
leave message
General
Help Wanted
Copy
Editor/Proof-
reader
Annie's, in Berne,
Ind., is seeking a
copy editor who is
passionate about
the written word
and doing their part
to make sure it is
correct. Responsi-
bilities include
some fact checking
and proofreading
for grammar, spell-
ing, punctuation
and consistency on
deadline in team
environment. Must
have experience
with AP and Chi-
cago style, comput-
ers and managing
files. Must know
Word and com-
menting in
Acrobat. Bache-
lor's degree in Eng-
lish, journalism or
communication re-
quired.
If you would like to
join our growing
Internet marketing
team, please check
out the company
Web site,
www.drgnetwork.co
m for more infor-
mation. Apply un-
der Career Oppor-
tunities.
EOE
Full time
RV technician
wanted. Duties
include general
construction,
plumbing, hitches
and electrical.
Apply at
www.smith-
rv.com/app.doc
MACHINIST
Large industrial re-
pair center located
in Wolf Lake, IN is
looking for a stable
experienced Ma-
chinist. Large
manual equipment,
experience a plus.
No CNC work.
Wage based on ex-
perience.
Please apply to:
bmrgroup@hot-
mail.com or call
260-635-2195
Light housekeep-
ing chores.
Call 260-724-9935
If no answer leave
a callback number
General
Help Wanted
Hair Stylist/Barbers
Openings in
Bluffton & Portland
Are you stuck in a
rut? Need a fresh
outlook. Come talk
to us! If you like to
have fun while
striving for the best,
then GREAT
CLIPS needs you!
Both FT and PT
positions available.
Must be licensed
cosmetologist or
barber.
Base Wage
Student Loan
Reim.
Most Equipment
Provided
NO booth rent.
CONTACT BETH
260-414-2584
OR
Apply online @
www.greatclips.co
m
JOB FAIR
Monday July 22
2pm-4pm
R&R Employment
@ Key Fasteners
525 Key Way Dr.
Berne, IN 46711
260-724-4810
Fast paced, detail
oriented, multi-task-
ing environment
DO NO CONTACT
KEY FASTENERS
DIRECTLY
Reporter
The Deca-
tur Daily Democrat
is seeking an en-
thusiastic and hard
working general as-
signment reporter
for Adams County.
This is a fulltime
entry level position.
Responsibilities will
include writing
news and general
feature stories,
coverage of as-
signed beat. You
must possess
strong writing and
photography skills.
Have some pagina-
tion experience us-
ing InDesign.
Knowledge of AP
style a plus. Send
Resume and writ-
ing samples to Ron
Storey, publisher,
Decatur Daily
Democrat, 141 S.
2nd Street, Deca-
tur, IN. 46733 or
Email to: pub-
lisher@decatur-
dailydemocrat.com
Some construction
experience, valid
drivers license;
some overnights
thru the week.
Call Greta @ All
American
260-724-9171 or
Jay @
260-415-1832
Drivers
Help Wanted
2500.00 Sign On
Bonus
Trucking company
in search of a
MECHANIC
with a positive atti-
tude that takes
pride in his quality
of work. Candidate
must be able to
demonstrate expe-
rience in general
truck and repair
and preventative
maintenance.
Saturday hours re-
quired. Must have
own tools. Pay
based on experi-
ence. Health insur-
ance, 401k, vaca-
tion & paid holi-
days.
FAX resume to:
260-357-3589 or
CALL
260-357-3100 ext.
618
CDL Driver
needed for full/part
time position.
Auger Feed trailer,
no bags, 100 mile
radius, flexible
hours. Paid mile-
age, drops, deten-
tion time.
Call 260-414-7003
Drivers
Help Wanted
DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED
NOW at Stevens
Transport! New
drivers earn $750
per week. No CDL?
No Problem! CDL
& Job Ready in 15
days.
1-877-649-9611
Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
Learn to drive for
US Xpress at TD!
New Drivers earn
$800/per week &
Full Benefits!
No experience
needed!
CDL & Job Ready
in just 3 weeks!
DRIVERS CAN
GET HOME
NIGHTLY IN
NORTHERN INDI-
ANA!
1-800-882-7364
U.S. XPRESS
SERVICE THAT
MATTERS
DRIVEN BY INNO-
VATION
Drivers, CDL-A:
Dedicated Account.
Get home 2-3
times weekly! The
Best Pay, Equip-
ment, Benefits &
More! Roll with the
best @ US Xpress:
866-293-9006
Drivers: $2,500.00
Sign-On bonus!
Home weekly &
weekends running
dedicated account.
Werner Enterprises
1-888-567-4862
Drivers: Co &
OWNER-OP's.
Solo's or Teams.
Dedicated and Re-
gional. Dry Van or
Flatbed.
Excellent Pay/
Home Weekly
Free Plate pro-
gram. No Upfront
Costs.
CDL-A, 2yrs exp.
866-946-4322
Drivers: Now hiring
for SE Regional,
OTR, 7 on 7 off!
Home Every Week-
end!
Great Pay and
Benefits, Call Jay
@ 1-855-809-4204
GEI-CORP
TRUCKING HIR-
ING--Class A CDL
Drivers. Regional
and OTR Drivers
needed with 2
years experience,
good MVR, no ac-
cidents, newer
equipment, termi-
nal in the Markle
area. We have
benefits, vacation
pay and home on
the weekends! Pay
is based on per-
formance, so
please call
260-758-2068. (A)
GORDON TRUCK-
ING- CDL-A Driv-
ers Needed! Up to
$4,000 Sign On
Bonus! Starting
Pay Up to .46 cpm.
Full Benefits, Ex-
cellent Hometime,
No East Coast. Call
7 days/wk! Team-
GTI.com
888-757-2003.
PART TIME
LOCAL DRIVER
WANTED
Must have
-Class A CDL
-2 yrs. experience
-1-3 days per week
as needed
-hourly pay work
up to 12-14hrs per
day
Please call
Jennifer at
800864-1688 ex
634
or apply online at:
bohreninc.com
Services
Imagine saving
thousands over the
lifetime of your
home with a new
Geothermal com-
fort system in your
own backyard!
Four reasons to
call Masters:
1. We dig our own
loops•no subcon-
tractors to worry
about quality.
2. We have 25
years of profes-
sional Geothermal
experience.
3. We are the larg-
est Geothermal
Dealer in the Mid-
west.
4. We offer a Sen-
ior Citizen Dis-
count.
Masters Heating &
Cooling
Call Today!
260-301-5586
Sporting
Goods
GUN SHOW!!
Kokomo, IN- July
20th & 21st, Johan-
ning Civic Center,
US Highway 31,
Sat. 9-5, Sun 9-3.
For information call
765-993-8942 Buy!
Sell! Trade!
Financial
Services
BANKRUPTCY
$25.00 to start
Free Consultation,
Ft Wayne Office
260-424-0954,
Decatur Office
260-728-9997. CH.
13 NO MONEY
DOWN. filing fee
not included.
Payment Plans
Available. Sat. &
Evening Appoint-
ments.
WE CAN HELP!
GOOD BAD
CREDIT, BANK-
RUPTCY, NEED
CASH FAST! PER-
SONAL LOANS,
BUSINESS START
UP AVAILABLE.
LOANS FROM $4K
NO FEES, FREE
CONSULTATIONS,
QUICK, EASY
AND CONFIDEN-
TIAL, CALL
24HRS. TOLL
FREE 888)
220-2239
Wanted
Wanted to buy:
used fencing for
large yard, chain-
link or wood, also
sunroom, reason-
able
Call 301-4732
Real Estate
#6174- New build-
ing site located in
the NEW Meadows
of Cross Creek!!
#6157- 1.4 acre
Building B-2 (busi-
ness zoned) lot, lo-
cated at Morning-
star Drive
#6159- Business
Zoned building
1,787 SF with full
basement.
#6181- 1.9 acre
business zoned lot.
Perfect for storage
units or apart-
ments.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
Steven J Kreigh
Broker/Owner
Cell 341-5077
**MONRO-
EVILLE**
A lot of house for
the money!! 4 to 5
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, 2 Car At-
tached Garage,
Gas F/A and C/A.
This home has a lot
to offer call today
for more info.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St. De-
catur
260-724-9131
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email laceycaf-
fee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell 260-223-3534
Office
260-724-9131
105 W. Honey-
suckle Lane, Deca-
tur
*3 bedrooms, 1
bath
*1-car garage
*Foreclosed home
at a great value
*Priced in the
$30’s
345 W. Line St.,
Geneva
*3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths
*1,943 square feet
*18x12 garage
*Priced in the
$30’s
3007 N. Salem
Road, Decatur
*3 bedrooms
*22x17 garage
*100x100 lot
* Priced in the
$30’s
Coldwell Banker
Roth Wehrly Gra-
ber
Zoda Real Estate
Group
724-8000
Ronda Cowans
260-223-2309(cell)
Andy Zoda
260-413-7462(cell)
Real Estate
135 W. Quayle
Run, Decatur
*3 bedrooms
*new kitchen
*shed & deck
*Priced in the
$60's
Coldwell Banker
Roth Wehrly Gra-
ber
Zoda Real Estate
Group
724-8000
Ronda Cowans
(260)223-
2309(Cell)
Andy Zoda
(260)413-
7468(Cell)
2 story home with
2 full baths.
Features: gas hot
water heat and
central air. Unat-
tached 2 car ga-
rage and profes-
sionally landscaped
lot. Call Jason To-
day.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
(260)724-9131
235 Oberli Street,
Berne
*newer roof, win-
dows, furnace, cen-
tral air
*24x32 garage w/
workshop area
*20x14 storage
shed
*Priced in the
$70's
Coldwell Banker
Roth Wehrly Gra-
ber
Zoda Real Estate
Group
724-8000
Ronda Cowans
(260)223-
2309(Cell)
Andy Zoda
(260)413-
7468(Cell)
2724 E. 250 North,
Bluffton
*large 3/4 acre lot
*3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths
*27x24 garage,
storage shed
*Priced in the
$120’s
Coldwell Banker
Roth Wehrly Gra-
ber
Zoda Real Estate
Group
724-8000
Ronda Cowans
(260)223-
2309(Cell)
Andy Zoda
(260)413-
7468(Cell)
701 Heatherwood
Lane, Ossian, IN
Country Meadows
Subdivision
A New Floorplan
from Ideal which
has the following
asked-for features
form customers-
kitchen pantry, 2.5
bathrooms, 2
walk-in closets in
the master bed-
room- larger ga-
rage- this house
has them all!
Call Al for appoint-
ment to see
341-8550
Ideal Suburban
Homes
Alot of home for
the money!! Hard-
wood floors thru
out, Newly remod-
eled kitchen and
baths, 4 bedrooms,
2 Full baths, Gas
F/A, C/A, Newer
windows, Vinyl pri-
vacy fence, and
Double lot. Call to-
day for additional
details!
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell:
260-223-3534
Office:
260-724-9131
Country Living in
the City! You’re
looking at a spa-
cious 5 bedroom
home that includes
over 3,600.00
square foot, a
mother-in-law suite,
a finished club-
house/apartment
outbuilding,swim-
ming pool, stocked
pond, all on over
3.5 acres of
wooded lot. Ideal
Realtors Jason
Kreigh Sales Asso-
ciate
Cell 413-1446.
Real Estate
Exceptionally nice
home in a great
neighborhood! 3
bedrooms, 1 1/2
baths, beautiful oak
cabinets, crown
molding in the liv-
ing and dining
rooms, walk in pan-
try, heat pump.
Roof is less than 1
year old, new
seamless gutters.
Huge backyard!
Call today to set up
your showing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St. De-
catur
260-724-9131
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email laceycaf-
fee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell 260-223-3534
Office
260-724-9131
•Like new condi-
tion
•3 Bedrooms
•2 Full Baths
•Appliances in-
cluded: Range, Re-
frigerator, Dish-
washer, Disposal,
Washer, Dryer
Ideal Suburban
Homes
260-341-8550 Al’s
Cell Phone
260-341-8557 Ev-
elyn’s Cell Phone
This home fea-
tures 3 Bedrooms 2
Full Bathrooms,
boasts over 1300
sq ft, vaulted ceil-
ing in the Great
Room, Spacious
Master Bedroom
with Walk in Closet
and Full Bath, Gas
F/A, C/A. The seller
has recently added
Beautiful Wood
Laminate Flooring
thru out the house,
fenced backyard
with 8 X 12 Shed.
Call today to
schedule your pri-
vate showing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St. De-
catur
260-724-9131
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email laceycaf-
fee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell 260-223-3534
Office
260-724-9131
3BR, 2BA, Newer appliances, furnace,
windows, well, septic, new roof, fireplace,
new garage door, 2 car garage, finished
basement, energy efficient, 1 acre with
mature trees, also orchard. Stateline 2 miles
North of 224, 8570 N 700 E Decatur
260-244-0240 amer.axle@gmail.com
134 Brandywine Lane 1845 sq.ft house w/
575 sq.ft 2 car attached garage. 3BR/2Bath.
Newly remodelled kitchen & bathrooms. New
laminate flooring. Vaulted ceiling &fire place
in living room. New stainless steel appli-
ances. Priced to sell! 260-223-0266
810 E. Monroe Street
BIGGER THAN IT LOOKS!!!
Beautifully landscaped, 4 bedroom, 1 bathroom
1348 sq.ft. ranch. Close to Bellmont High School.
Low property taxes, great starter home.
PRICED TO SELL!!! (260)223-7332
Four bedrooms, two garages, two-story
plus basement, fireplace, located on
one+acre wooded lot with mature trees in
AC school district
4300 W 500 N Decatur
260-547-4564
Home for sale in AC district Country
home in Adams Central district. Built in
2006. Approx 2300 sq. ft. with additional
Finished Basement. 2.02 Acres. 40'x80'
Barn with hayloft basketball court.
3 Bedrooms, possible 4th. 3 Full Baths.
Geothermal Heating and Cooling.
$265,000. 260-413-6696
Ranch Home for Sale. Anthony Wayne
Meadows. 3 Br, 2 Bath, 2 car garage, fenced
yard, 1571sf, new roof, heated floors, all
appliances included. 910 Yorktown Road
$133,900 OBO. Call 260-223-4455
3636 N. Shady Lane (Oakwood)
$250,000 Pictures and Description.
www.owners.com/WTW8442
4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 2 Fireplaces, 2
Kitchens, Finished Basement, Indoor Pool,
Elevator, Gym,Kennel, Wrap around
Driveway,...Everything Customized.
(260)724-7155
10195 N 200 E
Log cabin--1,800sq.ft. setting on 5
wooded acres, 3 possibly 4 bedrooms, 2
1/2 baths, utility room, full finishable
walkout basement, cathedral ceilings in
living area w/ catwalk, fireplace on main
floor and wood burner in basement,
geothermal heating/cooling, 40x63 pole
building w/ 14x14 overhead doors, 50x50
fenced kennel w/ 8x12 shed.
260-724-2783
Classifieds
Saturday, July 20, 2013 • Page 5B
Decatur Daily Democrat
Real Estate
Very well main-
tained home in a
nice quiet subdivi-
sion, close to
schools. Updates
include: new
kitchen counter top,
laminate floors in
the kitchen, Span-
ish lace, and more.
Huge master bed-
room with double
closets!
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell:
260-223-3534
Office:
260-724-9131
Real Estate
This home is lo-
cated in a nice
quiet subdivision
north of Decatur.
This home boasts
over 2,400 finished
square feet and in-
cludes 3 bedrooms
and 2 1/2 baths.
Additional features
include: partially
finished basement
with mini bar, large
yard, covered
patio, fireplace,
great landscaping,
eat-in kitchen with
Corian countertops.
Master bedroom in-
cludes walk in
closet and full bath.
2 car attached ga-
rage, new siding,
new heat and air
system (heat
pump) in 2011. Ap-
pliances stay with
the home.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St
Decatur
260-724-9131
800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check Out My
Website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell 260-223-3535
Office
260-724-9131
This truly is a "just
move in" home.
Features include:
new landscaping,
concrete drive,
freshly painted ex-
terior, 2 car garage
with opener, over-
sized lot, com-
pletely remodeled
kitchen, updated
bath, new carpet,
fresh interior paint,
spacious base-
ment.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell:
260-223-3534
Office:
260-724-9131
USDA 100% GOV-
ERNMENT
LOANS--Not just
for 1st time buyers!
All credit consid-
ered! Low rates!
Buy any home any-
where for sale by
owner or realtor.
Academy Mortgage
Corporation, 11119
Lima Road, Fort
Wayne, IN 46818.
Call Nick at
260-494-1111.
NLMS146802.
Some restrictions
may apply. Equal
Housing Lender.
Se Habla Espanol.
(A)
Very nice Indiana
limestone ranch
home located in
Stratton Addition.
New
windows, remod-
eled kitchen and
bathroom, newer
roof, furnace in
2010, and new wa-
ter heater in 2011.
Owners are very
aggressive on sell-
ing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell:
260-223-3534
Office:
260-724-9131
Brand NEW in
plastic!
QUEEN PILLOW-
TOP MATTRESS
SET.
Can deliver, $125.
(260) 493-0805
WORK ON JET
ENGINES- Train
for hands on Avia-
tion Career. FAA
approved program.
Financial aid if
qualified- Job
placement assis-
tance. ACC0190
CALL Aviation In-
stitute of Mainte-
nance
877-523-5807
1 & ONLY PLACE
TO CALL-- to get
rid of that junk car,
truck or van! Cash
on the spot! Free
towing. Call
260-745-888. (A)
State Line Auto
Parts always pays
top dollar for your
unwanted cars,
trucks, machinery,
and cub cadet
lawn-mowers! Call
724-3874
Mini farm! Country
property west of
Decatur. Features:
3 nice sized bed-
rooms, 2 full baths,
updated kitchen
with lots of cabinet
storage & counter-
top space and tile
floors. Hardwood
floors throughout
rest. Heated tile in
the bathroom on
the main level.
Built-in locker area
in the mud room,
gas F/A furnace
and C/A. and 2 car
detached garage.
Large barn with
several horse stalls
and storage. Nice
pasture area. 2
other outbuildings
for lots of uses.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell:
260-223-3534
Office:
260-724-9131
Services
Physician Assistant (PA)
Van Wert County Hospital
Van Wert County Hospital is in search of a part-time Physician
Assistant to |oin our Emergency Services medical team. Cualifed applicants
prove to be dedicated professionals who excel at providing compassionate,
patient-centered care, maintain the highest integrity for standards of practice,
and have a philosophy for teamwork.
The PAis responsible for ... the provision of care to newborn, pe-
diatric, adolescent, adult, and elderly patients in the ER under the supervision
of a credentialed physician. Bachelor’s Degree is required. Master’s Degree,
unless grandfathered in. Applicants must be credentialed and obtain current
certifcation from the National Commission on the Certifcation of Physician
Assistants. Hours are 12p.m. – 10p.m. Days, weekends, and holidays vary.
Candidates are eligible for a generous benefts package including: vacation,
sick time, personal time, and a 401k retirement savings.
QuaIiñed candidates are encouraged to submit a
resume/appIication to:
Human Resources, Van Wert County HospitaI
1250 S. Washington St., Van Wert, OH 45891
Fax: 419-238-9390
E-mail: hr@vanwerthospital.org · Apply online: www.vanwerthospital.org
EOE
SUMMONS - SERVICE BY
PUBLICATION
STATE OF INDIANA
COUNTY OF ADAMS
SS: IN THE ADAMS CIR-
CUIT COURT CAUSE NO.
01C01-1306-MF-0028
CHAMPION MORTGAGE
COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS
AND DEVISEES OF
CARL HOFSTETTER,
DECEASED and UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA
ACTING THROUGH THE
SECRETARY OF HOUS-
ING AND URBAN DEVEL-
OPMENT, Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT
The State of Indiana to
the Defendant(s) above
named, and any other
person who may be con-
cerned.
<RX DUH KHUHE\ QRWLÀHG
that you have been sued
in the Court above named.
The nature of the suit
against you is:
Complaint on Note and
to Foreclose Reverse
Mortgage on Real Estate
Against the property com-
monly known as 730 E
Shackley St, Geneva, IN
46740-8914 and described
as follows:
INLOT NUMBER TWO
HUNDRED FIFTY-ONE
(251) IN N.P. HEASTON'S
ADDITION TO THE TOWN
OF GENEVA, ADAMS
COUNTY, INDIANA, AS
THE SAME IS SHOWN ON
THE RECORDED PLAT OF
SAID TOWN.
This summons by publica-
WLRQ LV VSHFLÀFDOO\ GLUHFWHG
to the following named
defendant(s):
United States of America
acting through the Secretary
of Housing and Urban
Development.
This summons by
SXEOLFDWLRQ LV VSHFLÀFDOO\
directed to the following
named defendant(s) whose
whereabouts are unknown:
The Unknown Heirs and
Devisees of Carl Hofstetter,
Deceased.
If you have a claim for
relief against the plaintiff
arising from the same trans-
action or occurrence, you
must assert it in your written
answer or response.
You must answer the
Complaint in writing, by you
or your attorney, within thirty
(30) days after the Third No-
tice of Suit, and if you fail to
do so a judgment by default
may be entered against you
for the relief demanded, by
the Plaintiff.
FEIWELL & HANNOY, P.C.
By Susan M. Woolley
Attorney No. 15000-64
Attorney for Plaintiff
SUSAN M. WOOLLEY
FEIWELL & HANNOY, P.C.
251 N. Illinois Street, Suite
1700
Indianapolis, IN 46204-1944
(317) 237-2727
Publication@feiwellhannoy.
com
NOTICE
FEIWELL & HANNOY, P.C.
IS A DEBT COLLECTOR.
STATE OF INDIANA
COUNTY OF ADAMS SS:
IN THE ADAMS CIRCUIT
COURT CASE NO. 01C01-
1306-MI-0012
IN RE CHANGE OF NAME
OF MINOR: Landen Russell
0DYHULFN6WLIÁHU
Jamie Christine Jaquish
Petitioner.
NOTICE OF HEARING
Notice is hereby given
that Petitioner Jamie Chris-
WLQH -DTXLVK SURVH ÀOHG D
9HULÀHG SHWLWLRQ IRU &KDQJH
of Name of Minor to change
the name of minor child from
Landen Russell Maverick
6WLIÁHU WR /DQGHQ 5XVVHOO
Maverick Jaquish.
The petition is scheduled
for hearing in the Adams
Circuit Court on August 26,
2013, at 3:30 p.m., which is
more than thirty (30) days
after the third notice of pub-
lication. Any person has
the right to appear at the
KHDULQJ DQG WR ÀOH ZULWWHQ
objections on or before the
hearing date. The parties
shall report to Court Room
of Adams Circuit Court.
Date June 25, 2013
"SEAL"
Gayla M. Reinhart
Clerk Of The Adams Circuit
Court
Distribution:
Jamie Christine Jaquish
1178 S. 14th Street
Decatur, IN 46733
Brenden Daniel Jaquish
1178 S. 14th Street
Decatur, IN 46733
1st SHIFT MAINTENANCE
6:00 am to 2:30 pm · Monday ~ Fr|day
This position is responsible for the maintenance and repair of plant
equipment and systems using various electrical skills including:
3 phase 240/480V and single 110/220V, electrical motors, relays,
motor starters, mechanical skills, hydraulic and air systems.
Qua|ifed candidates wi|| have a minimum of one to three years
related maintenance experience in a manufacturing facility.
P|ease mai| resume with sa|ary requirements to:
Kennedy Manufactur|ng Co.
Attn: HR ·1260 lndustria| Drive, Van Wert, OH 45891
Legal Notice
G
E
T
NOTICED
CALL
TODAY!
724-2121
ADVERTISE
WITH THE
DECATUR
DAILY
DEMOCRAT
F O R
S A L E
BY OWNER
Legal Notice
One
EXPLOSIVE
Deal
Get
Two Months
of the
DECATUR DAILY
DEMOCRAT
$
14
HURRY!
Limited Time Offer!
Expires: August 5, 2013
Savings of up to
$
16!
~ Off the newstand price ~
NEW SUBSCRIBERS ONLY!
(must be Expired 30 days to be new)
Does Not Include Mailed Subscriptions!
Sign Me Up For This Explosive Deal!
MASTERCARD VISA DISCOVER
D
E
C
A
T
U
R
D
A
I
L
Y
D
E
M
O
C
R
A
T
I have enclosed my payment of
$
14
Send To:
141 S. 2nd St., Decatur, IN 46733
VYJHSS[OLVMÄJLH[260.724.2121 with your:
NAME: __________________________
ADDRESS:________________________
_________________________________
PHONE:_________________________
Saturday, July 20th @ 9:00am
Erma Sliger - Revocable Living Trust
1122 S. 13th St. • Decatur
Open House: Tuesday, July 8th 5-6pm
1 Story Ranch, 3 Bedrooms, 1 1/2 Baths, Living Room,
Kitchen/Dining Area, 22x24 attached Garage, personal property,
appliances, household items, furniture, shop equipment
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Saturday July 20, 2013 @ 9am
Dee M. & Jane R. Beavans
8903 Rothman Rd. Ft. Wayne, IN
Open House: June 18th & July 9th 5-7pm
Real Estate: 11/2 story cape cod with 2 acres +/- Personal Property,
Household Items, Power Tools, Shop Equip., Tractor-Ford 3000 gas
utility,
RV-1999 Cameo by Carriage 5th Wheel Travel Trailer, Furniture-
Quality namebrand, Lawn & Garden, Truck-1997 Ford F250
Extended cab diesel pick-up truck.
Ellenberger Brother’s
ellenbergerbros.com
Saturday July 20th @ 12 noon
Don Lehman
1124 S. 13th St., Decatur, IN
Open House July 8th(5-6pm)
Real Estate: 1 1/2 story home, 4 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, fireplace,
1,320 Sq.Ft., 1 car garage
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Saturday July 20th @ 12 noon
Marco Development LLC.
Lot at corner of 14th St. & CR 500 N. Decatur
Real Estate
100’ x 371’ (.851 A) Lot
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Saturday July 20, 2013 @ 9am
Dee M. & Jane R. Beavans
8903 Rothman Rd. Ft. Wayne, IN
Open House: June 18th & July 9th 5-7pm
Real Estate: 11/2 story cape cod with 2 acres +/- Personal Property,
Household Items, Power Tools, Shop Equip., Tractor-Ford 3000 gas
utility,
RV-1999 Cameo by Carriage 5th Wheel Travel Trailer, Furniture-
Quality namebrand, Lawn & Garden, Truck-1997 Ford F250
Extended cab diesel pick-up truck.
Ellenberger Brother’s
ellenbergerbros.com
Tuesday July 23rd @ 5pm
1715 Patterson St.
Yes Its Sold-Dealer Sale
Public Welcome
We Sell In Case Quantities
Tom Nowak Auctioneer AU19800035
Thursday July 25th @ 6pm
Genevieve Beverly
20811 Dawkins Rd. Woodburn, IN
Real Estate
Jerry Ehle
Schrader Real Estate & Auction Co.
1-800-451-2709
www.schraderauction.com
Friday July 26th @ 6pm
1715 Patterson St.
Yes Its Sold-Public Auction
General Merchandise & New Items
WE DO TAKE CONSIGNMENTS
Tom Nowak Auctioneer AU19800035
Saturday, July 27th @ 9am
7588 North 300 West Decatur, IN
John Deere Tractor, Zero Turn Lawn Tractor, Antiques/Collectibles,
Contemporary Furniture, Appliances, Treadmill, Tools, Lawn/Garden,
Hickory Tongue & Groove Flooring, Firewood
Equipment Sells @ 10:00 am
Equipment Has Been Well Maintained.
Ron and Carol Selking, Owners
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Thursday, August 1, 2013 @ 6:00pm
Kathleen Ann Mangine Estate
Auction to be held at the property on
100 W. just off US 27, just North of
intersection 900 N and US 27.
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday August 1st @ 6pm
Kathleen Ann Mangine Estate
Auction to be held at the property on 100 W just off US 27, just
North of intersection 900 N & US27
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday, August 1st @ 6:00pm
Karen Secaur-Owner
130 Wheat Ridge Ct., Decatur
North of Decatur on Monmouth Rd. to Piqua Rd.-turn left, con-
tinue to Honeysuckle Ln.-turn left, go to end of road, turn left on
Wheat Ridge Ct.
Household Items, Power Tools, Fishing Equipment, Lawn & Garden
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Friday, August 2, 2013 @ 5:00pm
Immanuel Lutheran Church
8538 N 500 E Decatur, In
Benefit Auction
Accepting new or good used donated items
Thursday Aug. 1st 9:00am-6:00pm and
Friday Aug. 2nd 9:00am-3:00pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
town-countryauctions.com
Friday, August 2, 2013 @ 5:00pm
Immanuel Lutheran Church
8538 N 500 E Decatur, In
Benefit Auction
Accepting new or good used donated items
Thursday Aug. 1st 9:00am-6:00pm and
Friday Aug. 2nd 9:00am-3:00pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
town-countryauctions.com
August 3, 2013 @ 10:00am (personal property) 11:00am (real
estate)
Heirs of The William C. Poulson Estate, David Brewer, Attorney
Bluffton National Guard, 500 E. Spring St., Bluffton, IN
Real Estate: 263.20 acres+/- of prime agricultural farmland.
Tract# 1: 98.96 Acres +/- Sect. 22 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 2: 71.47 Acres +/- Sect. 27 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 3: 40.77 Acres +/- Sect. 18 Harrison Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 4: 52.00 Acres +/- Sect. 10 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 5: Tracts #1 - #2 - #3 & #4 (As An Entirety)
Car-2011 Toyota Camry, Tractors-WD-45 & D17 A.C., Lund fishing boat w/
60hp Johnson & other items, Truck-1979 GMC pickup
Ellenberger Brothers
Saturday August 3rd
Personal Property 9am Real Estate 12 noon
Open House Monday July 22nd (5-6pm)
Tony & Lynn Fuentes
2646 E 450 S Berne, IN
Real Estate- Tract 1- 2646 E 450 S 3400 sqft home has 5 bedrooms,
2 car garage on 12+/- acres w/ 1/2 acre pond & much, much more
Tract 2- 2656 E 450 S 1900 sqft ranch w/ 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car
attached garage on 5+/- acres w/ pole barn, FarmEquipment, Tools
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Tuesday August 6th @ 5:30pm
Reginald Myers Estate
Lu Ann Garton, Personal Representative
265 Center St., Berne, IN
Real Estate- 2 bedroom home
Personal Property, Furniture, Glassware & Collectibles
Miz Lehman Realtors & Auctioneers
www.mizlehman.com
Tuesday August 6, 2013 @ 6:00pm Judy Hawkins Estate
3320 N Salem Road, Decatur, IN
From intersection US 27 & US 33, go East on US 33 to Salem
Road, turn South Approximately 1 mile, watch for signs
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday August 8, @ 6:00pm
Auction conducted at Hoagland Hayloft
15112 Brunson Road, Hoagland, IN
LAND AUCTION
3 Farms 94.07 Acres 5 Tracts
Farm One 18.02 Tillable Acres
Morton Road, Ossian, IN
Marion Township•Section 33•Allen County•3 Tracts
Note: Potential Building Sites
Only Minutes from Decatur & Ft. Wayne
Farm Two 51.47 Tillable Acres
Hoagland Road, Hoagland, IN
Marion Township•Section 24•Allen County 1 Tract
Farm Three 24.58 Acres
Winchester Road, Decatur, IN
Root Township•Section 28•Adams County•1 Tract
20+/- Tillable Acres + 4.58 Acres Hunting/Recreation
CKB Farms, LLC, Owners
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Friday August 9, 2013 @ 4:00pm
E & M Blacksmith Shop Consignment
2404 W 350 S
2 1/2 miles North of Berne to Road 350 S. Then West 1 1/2 miles
Shop Equipment, Farm Machinery, Lawn & Garden, New handmade
Amish furniture, horses, buggies, carts, etc.
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Real Estate & Personal Property Auction
Saturday, August 10 @ 9am RE @ 11am
604 Homestead Ave, Ossian, IN
Rose Ann Heights Addition
Property Backs up to Maplecrest Park
3BR 2BA Ranch-LR W/ FP, kitchen w/ center island, Formal
Dining Rm, Concrete Patio, 3 Season Rm, Finished 2 car Att.
Gar; 1530sqft
2002 Buick Lesabre, 1986 Buick Park Avenue, Husgvarna Model
2554 Lawn Tractor, Collectibles, Furn & Household, Appliances,
Lawn/Garden, Exercise Equip, Tools
Henry Miller Spinet Piano & Bench
Calvin J. & Lois A. Watson, Owners
Kevin Smith Power of Attorney
Cindy Waldman Power of Attorney
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
WiegmannAuctioneers.com
Saturday, August 10th @ 10am
Mark and Sandra Freadenberg
5640 E 1000N
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: Home and nearly 2 acres
Personal Property is selling online @ littlejohnauctions.com
Tom Bauermeister for Littlejohnauctions Inc.
Tuesday August 13th @ 6pm
Owners
Section 21 St. Mary’s Township
34+/- acres of woods
16+/- acres of tillable ground
50+/- acres
Farm Land
Krueckeberg Auciton & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Thursday August 15th @ 6:00pm
Wilma Jean Liby
1221 N. 2nd St
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: 2 bedroom home w/ garage & full basement,
fenced yard
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
August 15th @ 4pm RE @ 6pm
Butcher
1062 Russel St
Located South of downtown Decatur on Winchester St to Russel
to auction site
Open House August 5th 5-6pm
Real Estate, Personal Property, Antiques, Piano, Appliances, Lawn &
Garden, Household Items, Furniture
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
AUCTION CALENDAR
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
REALTOR STORAGE
CONSTRUCTION
HEATING & COOLING
GUTTERS
DRILLING
PLUMBING
GRAIN ELEVATOR
PRODUCE
WILLOW CREEK Store
SI60 W +00 SOUTH · BLRNL, !N
260-334-5080
FRESH SOUTH CAROLINA
FRESTONE PEACHES
GOOD FOR
Canning & Freezing
BULK lOODS
MLATS
CHLLSL
Now Available At...
CONSTRUCTION
E X T R E M E
BUILDERS
32/(%$516‡*$5$*(6
522),1*‡6,',1*
&21&5(7(‡$'',7,216
& MORE
FREE ESTIMATES
(260)
223-3713
PAINTING
CONSTRUCTION
AUTO REPAIR
CONSTRUCTION
CARPET CLEANING
You Can Run Your
ad in this space
for ONLY
$
2.96 per issue.
Contact The Decatur
Daily Democrat
at 260-724-2121
to find out how.
RENT ME
CONCRETE REPAIR
BAKER’S TRI-STATE
CONCRETE LIFTING
260-301-1269
“WE RAISE
SETTLED
CONCRETE”
www.bakerstristateconcrete.com
PORCHES, PATIOS, DRIVEWAYS,
FLOORS, STEPS & SIDEWALKS
You Can Run Your
ad in this space
for ONLY
$
2.96 per issue.
Contact The Decatur
Daily Democrat
at 260-724-2121
to find out how.
RENT ME
You Can Run Your
ad in this space
for ONLY
$
2.96 per issue.
Contact The Decatur
Daily Democrat
at 260-724-2121
to find out how.
RENT ME
NAPA Auto Parts
Announcing New Hours!
Weekdays
7:30am - 7:00gm
Saturday
8:00am - 4:00gm
Sunday
11:00am - 2:00gm
Your OnIy LocaIIy Owned
Auto Parts Store
207 N. 3rd St. · Decatur · 724-3129
AUTO PARTS
Classifieds
Page 6B • Saturday, July 20, 2013
Decatur Daily Democrat
SUDOKU ® by American Profile
Because your ambitions
and talents are likely to
blend together very
nicely over time, condi-
tions in the coming
months look to be quite
hopeful. You could do exceptionally
well in a number of areas in your life.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- A project that has been mis-
managed could come under your
direct control. You have the talent and
the know-how to succeed where oth-
ers have failed.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
You’re likely to do unusually well if
you are more concerned with the big
picture than the little details. Laying a
strong foundation will pay off.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- There are strong indications that
you’ll start cultivating an extremely
important relationship. It won’t be
established overnight, but it will even-
tually become one of your major alli-
ances.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- New heights can be achieved if you
have the motivation and desire to
reach for the stars. Tenacious effort
will be required, but all your striving
will be worth it in the long run.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Many of your associates will
appreciate the value of your ideas
and suggestions, giving them more
merit than even you do. Graciously
accept their sincere appreciation.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- Someone with whom
you enjoyed success in the past will
want to team up with you again. It
could turn out to be an even a bigger
coup than the first time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- You’ll have the gift of arousing
great interest in others regarding the
things you’re passionate about. To
the amazement of everybody, you’ll
even excite a negative pal.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- You are presently in a promis-
ing financial cycle where increased
earnings are a strong possibility.
However, don’t think that you won’t
have to work hard for what you’ll get.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- A rather unique opportunity is
likely to be presented to you by an old
friend. It might not look like much on
the surface, but it will develop greater
depth down the line.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- You’re likely to be much more suc-
cessful using traditional methods than
you would be trying something
unorthodox or new. Things that
worked well before will do so again.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- Certain information you get
from one party could be of great
value to another. If you bring these
two divergent factors together, every-
one could profit, including you.
GEMINI (May 21-Jne 20)
-- Developments that could improve
the affairs of both yourself and your
colleagues are brewing. Look for sig-
nals that things are happening, so
you can get on top of matters post-
haste.
Astro-Graph
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Puzzle #2850-M
Medium
1 2 3
4 3 5 6 7
7 8 9
2 8 4 9
9 6
5 3 1 2
7 2 5
4 6 1 8 7
6 3 4
Decatur Daily Democrat Saturday, July 20, 2013 • Page 7B
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Solution #2849-M
9 8 1 2 5 3 6 4 7
5 4 7 9 1 6 3 2 8
2 3 6 7 4 8 5 1 9
6 5 4 3 2 7 9 8 1
7 2 9 1 8 5 4 3 6
8 1 3 6 9 4 7 5 2
3 9 2 5 7 1 8 6 4
4 7 5 8 6 2 1 9 3
1 6 8 4 3 9 2 7 5
Beetle Bailey ® Mort Walker
THE FAMILY CIRCUS ®
by Bil Keane
THE LOCKHORNS ®
by Bunny Hoest and John Reiner
ZITS ® by Jerry Scott and Jim Burgman
THE BORN LOSER ® by Art and Chip Sansom
Blondie ® Dean Young & John Marshall
ARLO & JANIS ® by Jimmy Johnson
FRANK & ERNEST ® by Bob Thaves
BIG NATE ® by Lincoln Peirce
CRANKSHAFT ® by Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers
BABY BLUES ® by Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
THE GRIZZWELLS ® by Bill Schorr
Search: Decatur Daily Democrat
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 8B • Saturday, July 20, 2013
RE-DEDICATION CEREMONY
Saturday, August 24, 2013 2:30 pm
Guest Speakers - Military Salute - History
All donations and proceeds from the sale of 100th Anniversary Souvenirs
will be used to bring the Monument back to its original design that
featured a waterfall fountain on the nothside and also to build the
Veterans Wall of Peace in the lawn between the Courthouse
and the Peace Monument.
e Waterfall Fountain
Veterans Wall of Peace
Bricks are available to all Adams County Veterans
4”x 8” $70 - 8”x 8” bricks $135
Forms are available at the Adams County Treasurers Oce
Monument Souvenir Sellers and on-line.
www.adamscountypeacemonument.com
100th Anniversary Souvenirs
BRONZE COIN
100 YEAR HISTORY BOOK
SOUVENIR SELLERS
BERNE - FAITH & LIFE BOOKS AND GIFTS
DECATUR - THE HOMEPLACE
RITTER’S FLOWERS & GIFTS
YVONNE MARIE’S ANTQUE MALL
GENEVA- ADAMS PUBLIC LIBRARY GENEVA BRANCH
MONROE - SHAKA SHACK COFFEE & MORE
THE ADAMS COUNTY PEACE MONUMENT
is the rst monument in the United States
dedicated solely to peace.
It features the names of Adams County Veterans from
e Revolutionary War, e War of 1812, e Civil War
e Mexican War & e Spanish American War.
It was dedicated October 30, 1913.
Get the best deals on electronic
school supplies
In the not-so-distant past, scientific calculators were
the most technologically advanced school supplies stu-
dents needed. But today’s students rely on technology
more than ever. Thanks to mobile phones, e-readers
and portable computer tablets, the average student’s
back-to-school shopping list often includes at least one
electronic device. But with such technological advances
comes a higher price tag for supplies.
Parents faced with the task of paying for their student’s
school supplies, including electronics, may wonder how
they can save money. Electronics can range from the
affordable to the very expensive, and the most expen-
sive product is not always the best. Here’s how to shop
smart for electronic school supplies.
* Think about how the device will be used. Will your son
or daughter be typing term papers or putting together
reports? If so, a device that has a word processing
function will be necessary. Although many e-readers
and tablets have apps that function as word-proces-
sors, such apps won’t be as comprehensive as more
traditional word processing software. And unless the
student has an external keyboard for typing, using
a touchscreen can be cumbersome when producing
lengthy assignments. Some tablets also need to be
connected to a wireless printer in order to print docu-
ments. Keep these things in mind when shopping. If
a student needs to jot down notes or go online to do
research only, a hand-held device may be adequate.
* Educate yourself. Log onto the Internet and read
everything you can about the various devices available.
Some parents who aren’t tech savvy may quickly learn
that there is an entirely new vocabulary with regards
to technology and it pays to be informed. Having the
information at the ready and being able to discuss what
you want from a given product with a store employee
will make you less likely to spend extra money on things
that you probably don’t need, such as accessories or
upgrades.
* Comparison shop. Electronics are big business, and
different retailers provide different deals. For example,
one retailer may not offer as good a warranty plan or
tech-support as another. Compare apples to apples
when comparison shopping to find the best deal. Do
not be bashful about bringing in a competitor’s price to
a particular store you like and asking for them to match
a lower price. Many stores will do so to keep your busi-
ness.
* Consider a refurbished item. Manufacturers like Apple
offer refurbished items that are backed with the same
warranty as fresh-out-of-the-box merchandise. Because
these machines were rebuilt, the cost is considerably
lower than buying new. Also, refurbished equipment is
usually thoroughly tested before it is shipped out to a
new owner.
* Gauge your student’s level of responsibility. Is your
son or daughter prone to dropping or breaking things?
If so, you may not want to spend a fortune on a top-
of-the-line device. The tablet market has become
especially competitive, with many name- and off-brand
manufacturers offering variations of Android-based tab-
lets for considerably less than some better-known mod-
els. For example, Chinese manufacturer Ainovo offers
the Novo 7 Basic tablet for around $99. That’s even less
than some e-readers on the market. It may not offer as
many features as other tablets, but it may be effective
for basic Web browsing and email.
* Determine if a new device is really necessary. For
some students, peer pressure plays a heavy role in
their “need” for a new electronic device. If money for
supplies is especially tight, and there is already a
fully functioning computer at home, you may want to
postpone purchasing a new device until you’re more
capable of paying for it. Electronics often go on sale
during the holiday season.
Advertise Today!
Call 724-2121
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
0720.pdf7.88 MB
View more articles in:

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes