Skip to main content

From Left Field

January 17, 2011

By BOB SHRALUKA
    As a huge Buckeye football fan, one could go on and on and on here about the recent suspension of five players for five games next season for selling some memorabilia they owned and autographs. Instead, let's simply make a few points because even the eskimos at the North Pole can see the hypocrisy in college athletics.
    1. The Buckeye coach makes $3.9 million a year and the athletic director has a salary of $1 million annually. The school takes in roughly $4 million on a home game, of which it usually has six or seven a season. OSU's annual football budget is around $39 million. The NCAA, of course, hauls in billions ... and you know its officials are handsomely compensated.
    But the athletes, those who provide the entertainment that enriches everyone else, are supposed to live on a small monthly stipend like good little boys and girls. Here's 10 bucks, kids, go get your laundry done. Oh, and if you got a couple of bucks left, stop at Taco Bell — have yourself a ball!
    2. According to Ohio State, its student-athletes receive $22,258 (in-state) or $36,442 (out-of-state) from their grant-in-aid. But the federal government says the true cost of attending OSU is more. The Department of Education estimates the cost of attendance, which includes living expenses, is $25,833 for in-state students and $41,244 for non-Ohioans.
    "For those who have families who aren't able to help them fill that gap, it's a huge issue," said Doug Archie, OSU's associate athletic director for compliance and camps.
    3. Julie Posey, the mother of one of the suspended players, is a widow with four children. She says she's grateful for the scholarship her son, DeVier, has, but it still costs her thousands of dollars a year in miscellaneous living expenses.
    Because of limited on-campus housing, Ohio State athletes typically live in dorms only for their freshman year. They receive a stipend that's supposed to compensate them for food and housing costs their remaining years, but that doesn't cover all expenses. In the summer, when the players are expected to remain on campus to prepare for the season, the stipend is only half of what it is the rest of the year because it's based on academic credit hours taken.
    "You have to have a car," Julie Posey said. "You've got to have insurance. You've got to have gas money. What they give them for rent and stuff is not enough. It's just not enough.
    "The NCAA is amazing," she said. "Every time you turn around, they come up with something new to ensure that the young men that have poured their hearts and souls and energy and intellect into their craft are continually kept at a disadvantage when everybody else around them is running to the bank."
    4. Sure the players knew the rules. But a five-game suspension for selling or trading something they owned for a thousand bucks? No one hired an agent. No one stole anything. No one hurt anyone. No one got a DUI. No one was arrested.
    Pro quarterback Ben Roethlisberger raped someone (okay, allegedly raped someone) and was suspended for only four games.
    5. T    he NCAA continues to attempt to explain why the players were suspended from regular season games next fall, but not the Sugar Bowl. Only the people who buy the land in Florida via the Internet believe all the various explanations. Did anyone really suspect that, in fact, it had something to do about not wanting to pizzle off the Sugar Bowl people?
    6. While the players providing the entertainment continue to go without, the people running the bowl games are raking in six-figure salaries. It came to light recently that some of the top bowl people are making $400,000 to $600,000 each year.

Good news for merchants
    There was some good news for local merchants at Tuesday night's city council meeting: people aren't going to be entering your door every day to ask for money for Decatur's upcoming 175th anniversary celebration.
    Retired banker Larry Isch, who along with Max Miller is heading up a planning committee, said that rather than tap the merchants — many of whom are tapped out by all the local causes — the planners are hoping to get local groups, clubs, organizations, etc. involved.
    The idea, Isch said, is to have each organization sponsor a certain event planned for the 175th party — which, from here, seems to fall into the category of "great idea." Once a, say, club has an event it's responsible for, its members could raise funds, plan various aspects of the event, coordinate dates and times  and, in short, make it their own.
    Done right, this could be a neat thing for the community. And early on, it looks like planning is being both done and done right.
        There was some good news for local merchants at Tuesday night's city council meeting: people aren't going to be entering your door every day to ask for money for Decatur's upcoming 175th anniversary celebration.
    Retired banker Larry Isch, who along with Max Miller is heading up a planning committee, said that rather than tap the merchants — many of whom are tapped out by all the local causes — the planners are hoping to get local groups, clubs, organizations, etc. involved.
    The idea, Isch said, is to have each organization sponsor a certain event planned for the 175th party — which, from here, seems to fall into the category of "great idea." Once a, say, club has an event it's responsible for, its members could raise funds, plan various aspects of the event, coordinate dates and times  and, in short, make it their own.
    Done right, this could be a neat thing for the community. And early on, it looks like planning is being both done and done right.
       

    MARION—Both Bellmont cross country teams and the South Adams boys'...
Tonight the Braves host the East Noble Knights for senior night! Coverage begins at roughly 6:45 p...
Tonight the Squaws host Jay County for senior night at the Teepee. The coverage will begin at...

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes