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July 29, 2013

July 29, 2013

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Adams County
Engineer Tim Barkey
announced this morn-
ing that County Road
100 N will be closed
between Salem Road
and State Route 101
beginning today as
crews replace a struc-
ture at Gephart Tile.
The closure is expect-
ed to last for one week
Meanwhile, CR 525
E is now open to traf-
fic between 500 S and
State Road 218.
R.G. Zachrich
Construction of
Defiance, Ohio, has
completed the replace-
ment of the bridge over
Berger Ditch.
Kitchens
Windows
Appliances
Remodeling
260-724-7520
258 N 2nd St
Decatur, IN
mrplanners.com
The Decatur Daily
Democrat
75¢ at newstands
Inside
Page 6A
A look back at
the 2013 4-H
Fair...in photos
An independent newspaper serving Adams County, Indiana since 1857 July 29, 2013 MONDAY
IN BRIEF
A “Fallen Soldier”
dedicated blood drive in
memory of Spec. Nick
Taylor of Berne will
be held from 1-7 p.m.
Tuesday at the First
Missionary Church,
950 U.S. 27 S, Berne.
To sign up for a spe-
cific time to donate
blood, call 1-800-RED
CROSS or go to red-
crossblood.org sponsor
code “fmissb”.
Road closes,
another opens
Blood drive in
Taylor’s name
ACentral sets
registration
Adams Central
Community Schools
will hold registration for
the elementary, middle
and high schools on
Thursday, August 1.
Elementary registra-
tion (grades K-5) will be
held in the elementary
gym, with open regis-
tration from 12-6 p.m.
Middle and high
school registration
(grades 6-12) will be
held in the cafetorium,
with open registration
from 2-7 p.m.
The announcement
said the elementary,
middle school and high
school offices will not
be open prior to August
1; they will open when
registration begins.
Contact Us
By phone: 724-2121
By Fax: 724-7981
On The Web
www.decaturdaily
democrat.com
On this date
In 1981, Britain’s
Prince Charles married
Lady Diana Spencer at
St. Paul’s Cathedral in
London. (The couple
divorced in 1996.)
Today’s Birthdays:
Comedian ‘‘Professor’’
Irwin Corey is 99. Actor
Robert Horton is 89.
Former Sen. Nancy
Kassebaum-Baker is
81. Actor Robert Fuller
is 80. Former Sen.
Elizabeth H. Dole is 77.
Documentary maker
Ken Burns is 60.
Country singer Martina
McBride is 47.
Panel’s report
on city future
is outlined
By BOB SHRALUKA
A committee selected
by Decatur Mayor John
Schultz has been hold-
ing meetings since last
October in order to pro-
duce recommendations
for the city’s long-term
future.
Members of the com-
mittee are Greg Kitson,
Ben Faurote,
Anne Razo,
Keith Blythe,
Jason Brune,
Cam Collier,
Diedre Miller
and Adam
Lengerich.
The commit-
tee submitted
a lengthy and detailed
report to city council on
July 16. The report fol-
lows:
A Greater Decatur
“Progress in Motion”
Its vision, the com-
mittee said, is a family-
oriented community full
of opportunity and pride
– a place to call home.
Its mission is to attract,
retain, and engage citi-
zens through enhanced
quality of life and eco-
nomic prosperity.
Focus
After reviewing the
city’s comprehensive
plan, studying other
regional initiatives, and
hearing from other suc-
cessful communities, the
committee said, efforts
should be focused in fol-
lowing areas:
1.Redevelopment /
Revitalization
2.Personal and
Business Development/
Support
3 . R e c r e a t i o n a l
Opportunities / Social
Connectivity
4 . C o m m u n i t y
Marketing
Key message
In order to develop
a family-oriented com-
munity full of opportu-
nity and pride, we must
attract, retain, and
engage citizens through
enhanced quality of life
and economic prosper-
ity. Quality of life and
economic prosperity
are complimenting out-
comes, equally depen-
dent on and advancing
one another. To this
end, we must focus our
efforts on revitalizing our
community’s appear-
ance and recreational
opportunities,
encouragi ng
personal skills
and knowledge
advancement,
promoting the
growth and
development of
new and exist-
ing businesses,
and effectively marketing
our strengths to our citi-
zens and to those insur-
rounding communities.
These efforts naturally
support and enhance
one another.
A Closer Look:
Redevelopment and
revitalization
1.Address the gate-
ways to our city
2.Enforceable stan-
dards for personal resi-
dences
3.Downtown facade
restoration/standards
4. Cl eanup/r epur -
pose/reuse blighted
areas
5.Incentivize use of
downtown for small busi-
ness
Personal /Business
Development and
Support
1 . A d v a n c e me n t /
Engagement Center
2. Ent r epr eneur i al
Support
3.Business Incubator
4.Small Business
loans / financial support
R e c r e a t i o n a l
Opportunities / Social
Connectivity
1.Enhanced trail net-
work
2 . R i v e r f r o n t
Redevelopment
3.Active Community
Center
(Continued on page 3A)
BIG DAY ... Saturday was a busy day in Berne, with Swiss Days hitting full stride
and featuring numerous activities. Above, contestants race for the finish line
in the weiner dog race. The family of fallen soldier Nick Taylor served as grand
marshals of the annual parade. Below are the winners in the stein toss, from
left: Chase Lehman, boy’s champ; Hanna Mitchel, women’s champ; and Troy
Baumer, men’s champ. (Photos by Rebekah R. Blomenberg)
BALANCING ACT ... Two boys focus on balancing a cup of water on a Frisbee
in one of the relay races of Kids in the Park Summer Olympics held last week at
Legion Park in Decatur and sponsored by the local library. (Photo by Rebekah
R. Blomenberg)
Teen badly hurt in
bus crash improving
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— The most seriously
injured survivor of the
Indianapolis bus crash
that killed three people
has been moved out of
an intensive care unit.
An Indiana University
Health spokeswoman
says the teenager who
was in the Methodist
Hospital ICU in critical
condition is now listed in
good condition.
That teen is among
three who remain hospi-
talized at Methodist and
three at Riley Hospital for
Children from Saturday’s
crash. All are listed in
good condition.
An Indianapolis con-
gregation on Sunday
mourned the deaths of
their youth pastor, his
pregnant wife and anoth-
er member who were
killed when a church bus
overturned with just a
mile to go in a return trip
from a Michigan summer
camp.
Saturday’s accident
devastated members of
Colonial Hills Baptist
Church, who had been
anticipating a joyful
homecoming with the
37 people who were
aboard the bus. Youth
pastor Chad Phelps, his
pregnant piano-teacher
wife, Courtney Phelps,
and chaperone Tonya
Weindorf were killed,
said deacon Jeff Leffew.
Dozens of people were
injured in the crash,
which happened near
Interstate 465.
Dennis Maurer, a
68-year-old congregation
member who was driving
(Continued on page 3A)
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 2A • Monday, July 29, 2013
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Cool off your patio or deck
with a Sunesta
VARIETY — Swiss Days always offers a wide variety of activities, entertainment
and fun, and this year’s now-concluded event was no different. From the music
of the Original Alpine Express to the many games for young and old, there was
plenty to do and see. (Photos by J Swygart)
Some ways to
hold down your
electricity bill
So in case you’ve been hiding in a freezer the past
couple of weeks, you’ve noticed something — it’s been
HOT outside. And humid. And generally disgusting.
Those of us who have noticed are driving our electric-
ity bills through the roof with our air conditioning
and fans. And there are so many things that need
electricity (phone chargers, video games, the TV,
the list goes on!). So how do you stay comfortable...
without blowing your budget on electricity? Here are
some tips:
• Commit. — Pick one temperature that is com-
fortable for most of the people in your household
(if the kids have a problem with it,
let them know they can chip in on
the bill), set your thermostat there,
and LEAVE it there. Year-round.
Adjusting the thermostat all the
time makes your air or heat kick on,
which takes electricity and adds to
your bill. When you’re tempted to
move it, just remember the dollar
amount rising on your bill. If you get
the temperature right, it’ll feel good
to walk into whether you’re coming
in from the heat or the cold!
• Pay attention. — It’s so easy to
forget to turn off the lights in a room
you’re leaving, or leave your laptop
plugged in while you’re not on it,
or leave the TV on for background noise. They may
seem like little things, but these can really drive up
your electric bill. Focus on only turning on what you
need when you need it. If you’re not in a room, the
lights should be off. If you need background noise,
play music on the laptop you’re already using. And
don’t be afraid to penalize family members for for-
getting. It used to cost my brothers (never me; I’ve
always been perfect) actual money to walk out of an
empty room and leave the lights on. Raise the price
until no one forgets, and use the “fine money” toward
your electric bill.
• Set time limits. — Electronics are a huge part
of our lives, especially when the kids are off school.
They just want to sit at their computers or TVs and
play their games, etc. But guess what? That drives
up your power bill, too. Limit the amount of time
they’re allowed to play games, watch TV, and be on
the computer, to save your electric bill if nothing else!
Encourage them to go swimming or actually go see
the friends they’re talking to anyway. Remind them
that they probably have summer homework, and if
they don’t, make them read anyway. Suggest sum-
mer employment. Oh...and the time limits apply to
you, too. Don’t be a double-standard parent.
Good luck on that bill!
Cutting
Corners
By Rebekah
R. Blomenberg
Vets’ post
history goes
up in smoke
HARTFORD CITY,
Ind. (AP) — Members of
a northeastern Indiana
veterans post said a fire
ruined the building and
destroyed decades of the
group’s history.
Members of AMVETS
Post 23 in Hartford City
plan to clean up and
rebuild from Wednesday’s
fire, which burned
through the building’s
roof and left it mostly in
rubble, post commander
Bob Kovacs told The Star
Press.
‘‘The history, the
stuff that we had on the
walls — the plaques, the
awards, the pictures of
past commanders, the
names of the officers over
the years — those are
lost,’’ Kovacs said. ‘‘So
the memories that are
inside are gone.’’
No one was hurt in
the fire that a passer-
by spotted before dawn
in the 6,000-person city
about 20 miles north of
Muncie.
Fire Chief Ron Parrott
said the building was
engulfed by flames when
firefighters arrived.
Programsaddressnon-pointpollution
TheAdamsCountySoil
& Water Conservation
District (SWCD) has
cost-share programs
available in the St.
Marys’ Watershed which
will address non-point
pollution by providing
technical and financial
resources, according to a
news release.
These programs
have been funded
by the Clean Water
Indiana Grant, through
Indiana Department
of Environmental
Management’s 319
funds and a Great Lakes
Commission(GLC)Grant
to support implementa-
tionofBestManagement
Practices to reduce soil
erosion and sediment
runoff in the St. Marys’
River Watershed and
ultimately the Western
Basin of Lake Erie.
A large portion of the
grant funds are devoted
to a cost-share program
that provides assis-
tance to producers in
theSt.Marys’Watershed
to implement Best
Management Practices
(BMPs).
Such practices include
but are not limited to:
cover crops, filter strips,
nutrient management
planning, and equipment
modifications.
Some of the critical
areas identified as eli-
gible for this funding
are: conventionally tilled
agricultural fields that
intersect a stream or
ditch, areas of signifi-
cant erosion resulting in
large gullies, un-buffered
streams, and critical live-
stock operations.
The overarching goals
of this cost-share pro-
gram are to ultimately
reduce levels of sedi-
ment, nutrients, and
bacteriaintheSt.Marys
River. Cost-share funds
will be available with a
75 percent cost-share to
25percentmatchratio.
In an effort to get
more BMPs imple-
mented, the St. Marys
River Watershed Project
Committee modified the
cost-share program. The
changes are:
• Increase the maxi-
mum dollar amount a
cost-share recipient can
receive from $10,000 to
$20,000.
•Increasethepayment
caps of equipment modi-
fications, up to $6,00
for planter attachments,
and other equipment
modifications. Then up
to $8,000 for the pur-
chase of a RTK system
with1-2inchaccuracy.
• Offer a cost-share
rate of $40/acre to those
producers who would
use herbicides as a way
to kill off their cover crop
in lieu of any intense till-
age.
• Work with produc-
ers who installed grass
waterways under federal
or state programs and
are now in need of recon-
struction/maintenance.
• Provide cost-share
assistance to produc-
ers who want to apply
Gypsum to their field to
improve water infiltra-
tion, thus reducing soil
loss and runoff.
For more information
and eligibility require-
ments for this cost-share
program, contact Adams
County Soil and Water
Conservation District
Conservationist Ryan
Noblitt: (260) 724-3763,
ext.3.
Noadultchargesforteenwithfairexplosive
LAPORTE, Ind.
(AP) — A 16-year-old
who brought an explo-
sive device to a north-
ern Indiana county fair
can’t be tried as an adult
because of state law, a
prosecutor said.
‘‘We looked at it, we
wanted to; we felt it was
a heinous crime but
because it’s only posses-
sion (we can’t waive them
to adult court),’’ LaPorte
County Prosecutor
Robert Szilagyi said
this week. ‘‘If they had
been trying to set it off,
then we might have had
a chance, but because
they were just carrying
it around and they don’t
have any criminal his-
tory, there’s nothing we
can do.’’
If the teen had been
carrying a gun in his
backpack instead of a
bomb, he could have
been waived to adult
court, Szilagyi told The
LaPorte County Herald-
Argus.
The teenager was
arrested July 1 after
police say took a home-
made ‘‘sparkler bomb’’ in
abackpacktotheLaPorte
County Fair, about 25
miles west of South
Bend. The 16-year-old
told sheriff’s deputies
they had only intended
to scare people.
A 26-year-old man
in Renton, Wash., was
critically injured on July
4 when he detonated a
bomb made of 50 spar-
klers wrapped together
in a bundle. Some debris
was found as far away as
125feet.
The teens told police
they didn’t think anyone
would be hurt had they
been able to set off the
sparkler bomb near the
carnival rides. Authorities
didn’t respond to phone
calls from The Associated
PressonThursdayseek-
ing to find out how many
sparklers were in the
device.
When the 16-year-
old was arrested at the
fair, another teen tried
to intervene but deputies
subdued him with pep-
per spray and arrested
him.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Monday, July 29, 2013 • Page 3A For the record
Your Local Weather
Mon
7/29
73/55
Mostly cloudy. Highs in
the low 70s and lows in
the mid 50s.
Tue
7/30
76/60
More sun than clouds.
Highs in the mid 70s and
lows in the low 60s.
Wed
7/31
76/63
Cloudy. Highs in the
mid 70s and lows in the
low 60s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
From Decatur High 81 7 a.m. 56
weather station Low 56 River 2.64 ft.
Precip .14 Degree days 2
Obituaries
traffic
blOtter
Amelia R. Loshe
Amelia R. Loshe, 100, of Decatur, passed away
Saturday, July 27, 2013, at River Terrace Estates in
Bluffton.
Amelia was born on December 19, 1912, to the
late August T. and Ellen M. (Rumschlag) Lengerich
in Adams County.
On April 14, 1932, she married Herman P. Loshe;
he passed away February 19, 2000.
Amelia was a member of St. Mary of the Assumption
Catholic Church, Harvest House, Women of St. Mary,
and Lady of Victory study club.
Among survivors are three sons,
Jim (Ruth) Loshe of Decatur, Paul
(Shirley) Loshe of Fort Wayne, and
Gerald (Karen) Loshe of Bluffton; three
daughters, Rose Taylor of Madison,
Mass., Terri (Jim) Hoffman of Decatur,
and Nancy (Dan) Harris of Berne;
brother, Robert (Irene) Lengerich of
Fort Wayne; three sisters, Germaine
Straub, Dolores (Carl) Mankey, and
Mary Dale, all of Decatur; 20 grandchildren; 50 great-
grandchildren; and six great-great-grandchildren.
Amelia was preceded in death by a daughter, Carol
Ann; son-in-law, LaMar Taylor; three sisters; and six
brothers.
Visitation will be from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday, July 30,
at Haggard Sefton & Hirschy Funeral Home, with a
reciting of the Holy Rosary at 3:30 p.m. Visitation will
also be from 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 31, at
St. Mary Parish Hall.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at St. Mary of the Assumption Catholic
Church. Father David Voors will be officiating.
Burial will follow at St. Joseph Catholic
Cemetery.
Preferred memorials are to St. Mary Building on
our Heritage.
Online condolences may be made at www.haggar-
dandsefton.com.
Michael C. McAdams
Colonel (Retired) Michael C. McAdams passed
away July 27, 2013.
Col. (Ret.) McAdams was born in Springfield, Mo.
He graduated from McCallie School, earning a football
scholarship to the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Upon graduation as an ROTC Distinguished Military
Graduate from Ga. Tech., he was commissioned a
Regular Army Second Lieutenant of Artillery with a
Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering
and Management.
After initial assignments as an ADA
Platoon Leader in Cleveland, Ohio, he
commanded batteries in the 2nd Rkt/
Howitzer Battalion, 16th Field Artillery,
4th Armored Division, in Germany.
His subsequent assignments includ-
ed instructor duties at Fort Bliss,
Texas; Field Artillery Advisor in the
Republic of Vietnam; Executive Officer
of 10th Training Battalion, USAIS;
and Executive Officer of 2nd Battalion, 10th Field
Artillery, Fort Benning, Ga. Colonel McAdams served
with the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Military
Operations, Headquarters, Department of the Army.
He then was a Field Artillery Advisor to the IV Iranian
Corps and Chief of the War Plans Section, ODCSOPS,
Headquarters, USAEUR. From July 1975 to 1977, he
commanded the 2nd Battalion, 78th Field Artillery,
1st Armored Division in Germany.
He returned to the US in 1978 and was assigned to
Headquarters, TRACOC, where he activated and was
Director for Force Development and Modernization,
Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Combat
Developments. His last assignment was the Area V
Commander, First ROTC Region, Fort Bragg, NC,
consisting of 44 Senior ROTC and 82 Junior ROTC
programs in the states of North Carolina and South
Carolina.
His decorations and awards include the Bronze
Star, Meritorious Service Medal with two Oak Leaf
Clusters, the Air Medal, the Army Commendation
Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, and the
Department of the Army General Staff Identification
Badge. He retired from the United States Army after
more than 28 years of active commissioned service.
He worked another 15 years as a JROTC Instructor
at Loris High School, Loris, South Carolina.
Among survivors are his sister, Mary Forrest
McAdams of Charlotte, NC; daughters and sons-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Peterson (Gay) of
Decatur and Mr. And Mrs. Harold R. Setliff (Becky)
of Wilmington, NC; son, Michael C. “Mac” McAdams,
Jr., of Seaford, Va.; four grandchildren, Cristopher
Peterson, Gregory Peterson, Rami Chilton, and Loren
McAdams; and two great-grandchildren.
Col. McAdams was preceded in death by his
beloved wife of 54 years, Sandra Gay McAdams; and
his parents, Leonard James McAdams and Mary
Molivia Crawford.
The family will host a celebration of “Bud’s” life
on Saturday, August 3, at 2 p.m., at his residence in
Seaford, Va. For further information, contact Mac at
(757) 879-1308.
Burial will be held at Arlington National Cemetery
at a later date.
Preferred memorials are to “Support Our Troops”
of the Freedom Alliance Organization, 22570 Markey
Court, Suite 240, Dulles, VA 20166. You can also
visit them online at www.freedomalliance.org.
Arrangements are by Amory Funeral Home in
Grafton, Va.
Business Builders
Small square ads appear regularly in
the Democrat for 1 LOW monthly
charge. Frequency Advertising to
Build Your Business Awareness
CALL 724-2121 FOR DETAILS.
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Five In Custody
Five people were
booked in at the county
jail in recent days.
Arrested by the sher-
iff’s department were:
Leah N. Brewer, 19, E.
Monroe Street, Decatur,
for illegal consumption
of an alcoholic beverage.
She was ordered released
on her own recogni-
zance.
Bever l y R.
Augustyniak, 31, rural
Decatur, for interfer-
ence with custody. She
remained in custody
today under a $3,500
surety bond.
Donna L. Engle, 62, E.
Shackley Street, Geneva,
for contempt of Adams
Superior Court. She was
being held under a cash
bond of $1,282.61.
Arrested by Decatur
police were:
Juan E. Hurtado
Gutierrez, 21, Portland,
operating a vehicle while
intoxicated and posses-
sion of marijuana. He
was being held under a
$300 cash and $5,000
surety bond.
Dustin L. Beitler, 29,
N. Fifth Street, Decatur,
for the manufacturing of
methamphetamines. He
was being held without
bond.
ANGOLA, Ind. (AP)
— A man charged with
killing a romantic rival
in northeastern Indiana
more than 20 years ago
has been extradited from
India to face murder
charges.
The Steuben County
sheriff says FBI officials
returned 47-year-old
Mahfuz Huq to Indiana
on Saturday from New
Delhi, where he was
arrested in 2011 while
traveling from his native
Bangladesh.
Sheriff Tim Troyer told
The Herald Republican
that Huq will be held in
the Marion County Jail
in Indianapolis until he
clears medical tests. He’ll
then be moved to Steuben
County on charges in the
1989 stabbing death of
19-year-old Todd Kelley
at his Hamilton home.
(Continued from page 1A)
the church-owned bus, told authorities that its
brakes failed before it struck a raised concrete medi-
an and flipped on its side, Indianapolis police said.
The Phelpses, who were in their mid-20s, were
expecting their second child, Leffew said. Chad
Phelps was the son of the church’s senior pastor and
became its youth pastor late last year, he said.
‘‘We’re going to have a long road, but God is good,’’
Leffew said at a Sunday news conference.
The couple’s nearly 2-year-old child, Chase, was
injured in the crash. He was treated and released
from a hospital Saturday, IU Health spokeswoman
Sally Winter said.
The bus had nearly completed its 365-mile journey
from Camp CoBeAc, near Prudenville, Mich., when it
overturned about a mile from the church, where par-
ents were waiting to pick up their children.
(Continued from page 1A)
4.Art Initiatives (Sculpture Walk)
Community Marketing
1.Visitors Bureau
2.Regional/local advertising
3.Website/social media
4.“Did you know” campaign
The report then issues a time frame, as follows:
Within 3 Months:
1.Finalize name, vision, and mission
2.Establish Decatur as a Main Street Community
3.Being process of applying for Stellar Communities
grant application.
a.Commit to hiring consultant to assist in applica-
tion
Within 6 Months:
1.Complete Stellar Communities Letter of Interest
and Application
2.Develop Marketing Plan
a.Discuss/consider hiring City Planner / Marketing
Director
3.Secure and Establish Partnerships (Bunge, GE,
AEP, etc)
a.Business survey through ACEDC
b.Small business interviews
4.Establish and Finalize 3 and 5 year Plan of
Action and Milestones
5.Secure Letters of Commitment from 1st St prop-
erties
Within 1 Year:
1.Due March 2014 – Stellar Communities Letter of
Interest
2.Due April 2014 – Stellar Communities
Application
3.Finalize plan for City Hall
4.Finalize plan for Police Station
5.Finish project at corner of 2nd and Monroe
6.Finish Train Depot
7.Establish Community Identity program
a.Website / social network developing
b.“Did You Know” campaign
8.Address Public/Pedestrian downtown access
a.Alleyways
b.Wayfinding Signs
9.Commit to supporting Advancement Center ini-
tiative
10.Establish plan to address/promote residential
standards and beautification
Within 3 Years:
1.Complete 1st Riverfront Corridor project
2.Complete Railroad Corridor project
3.Address/Complete Gateway Beautification proj-
ects
4.Address/Complete Downtown District streetscape
and facades
a.Address blighted and empty buildings
5.Attract/Establish Reputable Hotel
Accommodations
6.Develop/Establish Business Resource Center
Within 5 Years:
1.Attract/Establish Downtown Housing
2.City Pool / Splash Pad Park project
3.Attract/Establish All-seasons Recreation Center
a.Bowling Alley
4.Address Riverside Center Utilization
a.Return to use as Community Center
Other Possible Projects:
1.Renovate/Repurpose Hannah Nuttman
a.Redesign to support Little League tournaments
2.Attract/Establish Movie Theater
Panel’s report on city
Teen badly hurt
Roy D. Stucky
Roy D. Stucky, 88 of Bronson, Mich., formerly
of Monroe, died Thursday, July 25, 2013, at the
Roudebush VA Medical Center in Indianapolis.
Roy was born March 7, 1925, in Berne to the late
Florenz and Metta (Nussbaum) Stucky.
On March 25, 1945, he married Mary Louise
Trump; she preceded him in death on September 14,
2012.
Roy was a member of the East Ovid United
Brethren Church in Coldwater, Mich. He retired in
1988 from National Oil & Gas in Bluffton. He served
in the United States Army during
World War II from June 1943-February
1946, and he was wounded in action
in Germany on December 12, 1944. He
received the American Theater Ribbon,
Eame Ribbon with 1 Bronze Star, Good
Conduct Metal, Purple Heart and the
Victory Metal.
Among survivors are his son, Donald
(Margie) Stucky of Monroe; three daughters, RoyaAnn
(Randy) Sheets of Bronson, Mich.; Marlene (Wayne)
Etzler and Louise (Greg) Gaskill, both of Decatur;
brother, Max Stucky of Angola; two sisters, Ruby
Brouer of Lagrange and Bonnie Wall of Bluffton; 14
grandchildren; and 21 great-grandchildren.
Roy was preceded in death by four sisters and
three brothers.
Visitation is from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. today at
Haggard-Sefton & Hirschy Funeral Home. Funeral
services will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday, July 30 at the
funeral home. Pastor Troy Green will officiate.
Burial will be in Covington Memorial Gardens in
Fort Wayne.
Preferred memorials are to East Ovid United
Brethren Church.
Online condolences may be made at www.haggar-
dandsefton.com
Eric O. Case, Jr.
Eric O. Case, Jr., 21, Decatur, died Sunday in
Bluffton.
Arrangements are pending at Yager-Kirchhofer
Funeral Home.
Stucky
Loshe
McAdams
City Accidents
Three accidents were
investigated by Decatur
police in the past three
days.
At 5:15 p.m. Friday,
a rear-end collision
occurred at the intersec-
tion of Monroe and 13th
Street. Police said Kelly
M. Walker, 34, Highland
Park, Decatur, was
stopped for a red light but
when the light turn green
was still not able to go
forward due to traffic in
the intersection. Her car
was struck in the rear by
a following car operated
by Breanna M. Tilley, 26,
Markle. Police set damag-
es to the cars at between
$1,001-$2,500.
At 11 a.m. Saturday,
a hit-skip mishap was
reported to police by
Jamie L. Swygart, Line
Street, Decatur. He told
police he heard a crash
from inside his house
around 10:30 a.m. but
didn’t see anything
when he looked outside.
Approximately 30 min-
utes later he discovered
the driver’s side door of
his parked car had been
struck, causing an esti-
mated $2,501-$5,000 in
damage.
At 8:20 p.m. Saturday,
Nicholas D. Reinking, 18,
rural Decatur, was east-
bound on Monroe Street
near Third Street when
he struck the rear end
of a pickup truck driven
by Sean M. Faurote, 35,
Adams Street, Decatur,
that was stopped in traf-
fic. The crash caused
an estimated $5,001-
$10,000 in damage.
Rural Crash
A two-vehicle mishap
was investigated Friday
at 8:40 a.m. by the sher-
iff’s department.
Police said Myron L.
Yers, 64, rural Berne,
was southbound on
U.S. 27 near C.R. 400N
when he struck a pickup
truck driven by Robert
G. Christener, 70, rural
Monroe. The crash
caused an estimated
$1,001-$2,500 in dam-
age.
Tot hit, killed
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Police in Indianapolis say
a 1-year-old child has
died after being struck
by a vehicle.
The child was hit
Sunday evening in a
neighborhood on the
city’s west side and
was pronounced dead a
short time later at Riley
Hospital for Children.
Fugitive returned to Indiana
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 4A • Monday, July 29, 2013 OpiniOn
The DecaTur Daily DemocraT
Ron Storey, Publisher
Bob Shraluka
Managing Editor
J Swygart
Opinion Page Editor
Educated, and
unemployed
By COLLEEN TEUBNER
After graduating from high school, I had two
choices: I could earn a college degree while shoul-
dering debt, or struggle in a highly competitive job
market without one. I chose the former. And I’m
not the only one.
My generation is setting records in higher edu-
cation. According to a 2012 Pew Research Center
analysis, one in three of the country’s 25-to-29-
year-olds has a bachelor’s degree — making that
credential twice as common in the age group as it
was in 1971.
We’re also setting records in underemployment.
Nearly half of the recent college grads who have
found work are in jobs that don’t require a four-
year college degree.
We have the necessary knowledge and skills to
succeed. So why aren’t we succeeding?
For one thing, there aren’t enough professional
jobs available. Then, there are loans.
For the past two years, there was a 3.4 per-
cent fixed and subsidized interest rate on Stafford
loans, a form of student financial aid that more
than 10 million students use each year. That rate
doubled on July 1. Senate Democrats tried to
reinstate the original rate a week later, but failed.
Instead, Congress settled on a bipartisan agree-
ment.
Under this new plan, the government will peg
the interest rate for new Stafford loans to the
financial market by setting it 2.05 percentage
points over the 10-year Treasury note rate. As
we embark on our careers, college grads who’ve
taken out Stafford loans, like myself, could be
responsible for paying as much as 8.25 percent,
the maximum interest rate allowed by the new
arrangement.
Total student debt has ballooned to nearly $1
trillion, nearly triple 2004 levels, according to a
Federal Reserve Bank of New York report. If the
new plan is enacted, just imagine how much stu-
dent debt there will be in 2020.
Public opinion polls underscore our dilemma.
More than 80 percent of Americans agree that it’s
harder for us to find jobs than it was for our par-
ents. But our problems don’t end there. About 70
percent believe that it’s also tougher for our gen-
eration to save for the future, pay for college, or
buy a home.
So, what happens when we can’t find work and
can’t pay our loans? When our parents have the
means to help, we call home.
In 1993, 80 percent of parents expected their
young children to be financially independent by
the age of 22. Times — and the economy — have
changed. Today, only 67 percent of parents feel
this way. It’s become much more socially accept-
able for young adults to remain financially depen-
dent on their parents until the age of 25 or later.
Sorry, Mom and Dad.
We’re the most educated generation in American
history, yet many of us are unemployed or under-
employed. And too many of us are still financially
dependent on our parents.
We invest about four years of our lives and up
to hundreds of thousands of dollars in our educa-
tion, and then spend the next decade trying to get
out of ever-increasing debt.
Next spring, I’ll be graduating again — this time
with a bachelor’s degree. Instead of moving on to
graduate school, I’ll be entering the workforce full-
time. I need to take time off to work if I hope to
pay off my loans in the near future. At this rate, I
can’t afford to pay interest.
Colleen Teubner is a student at the George
Washington University
Government emails, John Gregg and me
NASHVILLE, Ind. – There’s been
an interesting sideshow these
past couple of weeks consisting
of emails from former Gov. Mitch
Daniels, former Education Supt.
Tony Bennett and his then-chief of
staff Todd Huston about whether
the writings of Prof. Howard Zinn
should be exposed and taught to
Indiana students.
If nothing else, it’s given us
an inner view of one of the more
successful governorships in mod-
ern times, the first digital one
at that, how power
and influence was
wielded.
And this Daniels
email story forged
by Associated
Press reporter
Tom LoBianco
and his Freedom
of Information
Act requests
to the Indiana
Department of
Education might
not have existed had not this writer
ended up at a Vincennes University
luncheon with then-House Speaker
John Gregg in November 2001.
Gregg had pulled some strings
and gotten me an honor from the
university where I studied journal-
ism under Prof. Fred Walker Jr.,
between 1974 and 1976 before
heading off to Indiana University at
Bloomington. It wasn’t something I
had sought and it certainly worked
against the grain of my modus
operandi which is to “blend” as
opposed to being a conspicuous
character.
I didn’t know it at the time, but
those circumstances allowed me to
make perhaps my biggest impact
on Indiana journalism.
The Internet age had dawned
and was now becoming a pervad-
ing aspect in the way we commu-
nicate. In the long Indiana General
Assembly session of 2001, House
Bill 1083 would have prevented
press access to the electronic mails
of government officials. Beyond
personal meetings, phone calls,
letters and facsimiles, the email
was becoming a key way to com-
municate and the rules developed
around it not unlike what we’re cur-
rently witnessing with Facebook,
Twitter and Instagram.
HB1083 passed both chambers
and ended up on the desk of Gov.
Frank O’Bannon, who by voca-
tion was publisher of the Corydon
Democrat. O’Bannon vetoed the
bill.
Had he signed HB1083, it would
have dramatically changed Indiana
journalism by keeping what has
become a huge swath of infor-
mation out of the public arena.
We wouldn’t have learned, for
instance, about the cozy relation-
ship between Duke Energy and
the Indiana Utility Regulatory
Commission and the Edwardsport
plant overruns.
The volume of emails between
government officials, their employ-
ees, counterparts, constituents
and even the press has been huge
and expansive. Having the poten-
tial access to these emails hasn’t
been abused, in my opinion, but
it adds a 21st Century check and
balance for the Fourth Estate and
its watchdog role over government.
Most government officials know
that you don’t put anything in an
email that you wouldn’t be com-
fortable with showing up in a court
hearing or on the front page.
As Robin Winston, former
O’Bannon aide and Indiana
Democratic chairman, liked to say,
“A letter can die on the shredder,
but an email lasts forever.”
After O’Bannon vetoed the bill,
Speaker Gregg was under intense
pressure from his chamber to
bring up the veto for an override on
Organization Day that November.
Given Indiana’s weak constitution-
al governorship, the override prob-
ably would have been successful.
And by circumstance that he had
concocted, John Gregg ended up
at a luncheon table seated next
to me.
While most of us at the luncheon
were dressed in ties and sport
coats, I remember Gregg showed
up wearing a red and black lum-
berjack shirt. He was in his usual
jovial mood, enjoying the notion
that I had to ride in a convertible
through downtown Vincennes as
part of its annual holiday parade,
which reminded me of the final
scene in the movie “Animal House”
though the boys at Delta House
were hung over and didn’t show.
What John Gregg ended up with
was a third-generation journalist
who relentlessly bent his ear about
his upcoming decision to call up
the O’Bannon veto of 1083 the fol-
lowing week.
In the Dec. 9 2004 “10th
Anniversary Edition” of Howey
Politics (you can read it in the
Indiana State Library arhives), I
described the scene: “I pleaded,
begged and implored Gregg not
to hand down the bill. He listened
politely, but was noncommittal.
When I left the banquet hall, I used
a ‘Rexism’ to describe what I had
just done, telling a friend, ‘I feel
like I just threw up in the punch
bowl.’”
A week later, Gregg refused to
hand down the override.
And three years later, in that
10th anniversary edition, Gregg
observed, “You were not given the
credit you personally deserved on
the issue of the media bill and the
override. You told me it would’ve
been disastrous to hand it down
and you were right. That is a deci-
sion I’ve never regretted and I owe
you a big one on that.”
Actually, despite the discomfort
of the demise of this bill has caused
Purdue President Daniels and now
State Rep. Huston, Hoosiers all
owe Gregg a big debt of gratitude
for having the courage to buck
his chamber and keep government
emails in the check and balance
system that has, for the most part,
kept Indiana state government cor-
ruption-free since the last big scan-
dal that occurred 30 years ago.
The columnist publishes at www.
howeypolitics.com.
Brian
Howey
DECATUR DAILY DEMOCRAT
VOL. CXI, NO. 179, Mon., July 29, 2013
The Decatur Daily Democrat (USPS 150-780) is pub-
lished daily except Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day
and Christmas Day by: HORIZON PUBLISHING CO. OF
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Periodicals postage paid at Decatur, IN. POSTMASTER:
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Democrat,141 S. 2nd St., Decatur, IN 46733.
Morally right and good economics
By DONNa BRaziLE
A little more than six months
into his second term, President
Obama returned to the theme of
his presidency, and perhaps his
entire political career: carrying out
the promise made in the preamble
to the Constitution. The president
wants to refocus our attention on
the economy and helping middle-
class families because that’s the
moral imperative of our Founders:
to promote the general welfare.
From the day he took office,
Obama’s goal has been econom-
ic restoration, the foundation of
social stability. But certain seg-
ments of Congress don’t under-
stand that the equation “We
the people” means policies that
strengthen opportunity for the
most people and support those
most in need. “We the people” does
not refer to an oligarchy of the
increasingly super-rich amassing
more and more of the country’s
wealth for themselves.
Despite some media whining,
Obama’s ideas are not new ideas.
He is proposing well-thought-out
programs to restore economic
progress for the working and mid-
dle classes, based on fundamental
principles. “This country offered
you a basic bargain,” he said this
week at Knox College. It offered
“a sense that your hard work
would be rewarded with fair wages
and benefits, the chance to buy a
home, to save for retirement and,
above all, to hand down a better
life for your kids.”
Unfortunately, we’ve come to
expect congressional Republicans
to obstruct progress and under-
mine efforts “to provide for the
general welfare.” Thus it was not
surprising that Republican lead-
ers announced their intention to
stonewall the president’s plans to
better the economy, and also to
reverse all the public benefits from
laws already enacted.
The Republican chairman of
House Appropriations, Rep. Harold
Rogers, announced bills to shoot
down Obama’s major economic
initiatives. They slash the budgets
for various departments from 30
to 50 percent. “These are tough
bills,” Rogers said. “His priorities
are going nowhere.” Republicans
have pledged to shut down the
government come October, unless
Obama agrees to completely
defund Obamacare.
“This is as serious a challenge
on fiscal matters as I’ve ever seen,”
Democratic House Whip Steny
Hoyer said.
But what we are seeing that
we haven’t expected is support
for what may be called privatized
financial oligarchy at the local
level.
For example, Obama wants to
increase the minimum wage, which
hasn’t been touched for four years
(making him the first president
in decades in whose term there’s
been no increase.) This disregard
— even disdain — for the working
poor reflects what Obama calls a
“winner-take-all economy where
a few do better and better, while
everybody else just treads water.”
The nation’s single largest
employer, Wal-Mart, has courted
the Washington, D.C. city council
for months, helped by a pres-
tigious local lobbyist, David W.
Wilmot, who receives a retainer
of $10,000 a month. Wal-Mart
wants to build six stores in the
District, which major retailers,
preferring the wealthier suburbs,
have shunned for years.
That would seem to be good
news. Except Wal-Mart underpays
its employees. A study by the
state of Ohio found that “15,484
Wal-Mart workers and dependents
received Medicaid benefits in
June 2009, and 12,872 Wal-Mart
workers and dependents got food
stamps.” The state representa-
tive who commissioned the study,
Youngstown Democrat Robert
Hagan, extrapolated that Ohio tax-
payers shelled out $67 million for
Wal-Mart employees.
It gets worse. Wal-Mart pub-
licly supported Obamacare, then
this year kicked thousands of its
employees off its health plans
by demoting them to part-time
employees. All employees hired
after January 2012 who work
under 30 hours a week, will lose
Wal-Mart’s health plan. For many,
that means the state will pick up
the tab.
Enter the D.C. Council, which
saw a need to provide for its
citizens who have no union rep-
resentation. The council passed a
“living wage” bill that will apply to
large corporations without unions,
like Wal-Mart. Businesses with
more than $1 billion in income
yearly, and over 75,000 square
feet of retail space, must pay their
employees $12.50 per hour.
Wal-Mart threatened to cancel
three of its planned stores not yet
in development, and might pull
the other three under construc-
tion, if the living wage bill passes.
The council refused to be intimi-
dated, and passed the bill 8 to 5.
But the bill is opposed by Mayor
Vincent C. Gray. To override a
veto — if Gray vetoes the bill —
requires nine votes. Two of the
council members who opposed the
bill are running for mayor, and
likely have no desire to alienate
the big corporations and develop-
ers who bankroll campaigns. It’s
going to be a tough sell to convert
one of the other three.
Obama said at Knox College:
“This growing inequality isn’t just
morally wrong; it’s bad economics.
When middle-class families have
less to spend, businesses have
fewer customers. When wealth
concentrates at the very top, it
can inflate unstable bubbles that
threaten the economy. When the
rungs on the ladder of opportunity
grow farther apart, it undermines
the very essence of this country.”
Unfortunately, it seems that for
now Washington’s mayor is not
sure what side he might end up
fighting for.
Donna Brazile is a senior
Democratic strategist and a politi-
cal commentator and contributor to
CNN and ABC News.
Mike and Barb
Meyer of Decatur, along
with Roger and Vicki
Duncan of Evansville,
are pleased to announce
the engagement of their
children, Molly Renee
Meyer and Bradley
Alan Duncan, both of
Zionsville, Ind.
Molly is a 2006 grad-
uate of Bellmont High
School , and graduat-
ed Purdue University
with bachelor’s degree
in movement and sport
sciences in 2010. She
then received a master’s
degree in occupational
therapy from IUPUI in
2012. She is currently
employed as a Pediatric
Occupational Therapist
at Riley Hospital for
Children.
A graduate of
Evansville North High
School, Bradley received
a bachelor’s degree in
economics from Purdue
University in 2010. He
is currently employed as
Relationship Manager
at Key Bank.
The couple plan
to marry October 12,
2013, in Indianapolis.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Monday, July 29, 2013 • Page 5A
Community
SHOP & EXPLORE
VAN WERT, OHIO
The first fair was
held October 30, 1855, in
the City of Van Wert in a
cleared area in the north-
west section of town. It was
only a one-day fair. The
town was mostly log cabins.
Awards were given for the
few animals and vegetables
brought to the fair.
By the third fair in
1857, the Agricultural Soci-
ety, now formed to organize
the annual fair, had pur-
chased 5.67 acres at a cost
of $184. This was at the
present day site of the Van
Wert County Fairgrounds.
The Fair has been held in
its present day location ev-
ery since.
As of 2013, the
Agricultural Society oper-
ates from the Van Wert
County Fairgrounds where
they have 104 acres and 50
buildings. The 2013 Fair is
the 157th.
157th
VAN WERT COUNTY FAIR
August 28 thru September 2, 2013
FOR MORE INFORMATION
419-238-9270
vwfair@bright.net
www.vanwertcountyfair.com
HIGH SCHOOL BAND SHOW
AT GRAND STAND
MON•SEPT 2 @ 7PM
OPENING BAND “EXPLOIT”
JAMES OTTO
SAT • AUG 31 @ 8PM
(MAIN
PERFORMER)
HARNESS RACING
WED & THURS @ 7PM
KIDS DAYS
THOROUGHBRED/QUARTER
HORSE RACING
SEPT 2 @ 1PM
HEAVY WEIGHT CLASS
HORSE PULLING
SEPT 1 @ NOON
MICHINDOH TRUCK &
TRACTOR PULL
AUG 30 @ 7PM
The Van Wert County Fairgrounds
{260} 724-8899
Visit our website: www.town-countryauctions.com
Mr & Mrs Wayne Byerly, Owners
DAVE MYERS AU01045029
CHARLIE HILL AU10700054
KIRT McLELAND AU11000038
LEROYYODER AU01014642
816 W. Monroe St., Decatur, Indiana
Friday, January 25, 2013 ¶ 5:00 P.M.
8aturday, January 26, 2013 ¶ 9:00 A.M.
Plenty o] Pcrkìny - Hected 8uìldìny - Lunch by 1cnet's Dcsìs - Restrooms - Not Responsìble ]or Accìdents
2 0ays
ºByerly Auction"
ºAntiques - Antiques - Antiques"
Ajter travellìny 8 collectìny antìques jor over 45 years,
the ßyerlys have decìded to downsìze
Located at the Adams County 4-H Faìryrounds (Commercìal ßuìldìny), Monroe, lndìana,
or South oj Fort Wayne, lndìana's 469 ßyµass, on US 27, 19 mìles (throuyh 0ecatur) to the ìntersectìon oj US 27
8 124. Turn lejt (or East)1 mìle to Faìryrounds - "watch jor sìyns."
$17,48(6&2//(&7,%/(6
2 0oor cupboard, Coat rack, Floor lamp, Dak sIde board, Phonograph, PIe sale, Fed felt chaIr, Fed love seat sofa,
ShavIng cupboard, Small oak wardrobe, 7Ictor red sofa, WhIte faIntIng couch, Wooden book case, Wooden rocker,
1890 HorIzontal hand drIll, J Prong wooden fork, Agar boxes, AmerIcan SettentrIonale wooden map·1688, Angle
chInners, Angle elboard parts, Apple butter presses, Apple butter stIrrer, Apple copper kettle, 8arn beam augers,
8arrell butter churn·pat.1890, 8entwood churn·Wapak DH, 8oss E Acme barrel butter churn, 8rass E copper ßy
sprayers, 8rass sleIgh bells, 8uck saws, 8uckeye metal tractor seat, HoosIer metal tractor seat, |Ilwaukee metal
tractor seat, 8urgular alarm from ToscIn 8ank, (2) 8utter churn #40, 8utter makers, Candle molds, Cast Iron chImney
covers, Cast Iron coffee grInder·1845, Cast Iron spIttoon, Clothes dryIng racks·1891, Copper kettle, Corn jobber, Corn
sheller, Cow bells, Cradle scythe, Crocks of all sIzes, Cross wooden grape press, 0aIsy butter churn #J, 0Iamond corn
sheller, 0Inner bells (1·J·4·5), 0ouble handle cranberry scoop, Fly traps, FruIt jar holder, FruIt press, Class butter
churns (sIze J·4·6·8), Class ñre extInguIshers, Coat cart, Coose neck broad ax, Crey granIte oIl burner, CrIswald cast
Iron pots, CrIswald corn bread pan, CWT lamp, Hamburger patty press·1881, Hand school bells, HangIng kerosene
brass 8EH lamp·pat. 1894 E 1896, HangIng kerosene Cone WIth the WInd lamp, HangIng kerosene lamp w/black
bracket, HangIng kerosene lamp w/black bracket E smoke top·pat. 1871, The Fochester hangIng kerosene brass
lamp·pat. 1887, Harness stItcher, Hay cutters, Hay knIves, Hobnob crystal glassware, Hog scrapers, Horse collar
w/mIrror, Horse drawn stage coach, Ìce tongs, ÌndIan stones, ÌndIan stone axes, Ìron pItcher E bowl, Kane cutter,
Keen cutter straIght razor, Kerosene lamps, Kleen cutter hatch key, Lace doIllIes·curtaIns·tablecloths, LadIes Home
Journal pattern box, Lard press, Large apple press, Large copper kettle, Large ßat top wooden trunk, Large slaw
cutter, Large spInnIng wheel, Large tIn candle holder, Large wooden dough bowl, Leather stand, |aId FIte wash
board, |any mIlk glass bowls E dIshes, WhItley |etal tractor seat, |Iner's lamp, |InIature kerosene lamps, |InIature
Wapak wafße Iron, New York Central oIl can, Dak wall phone, DIl cans, Dld corn planter, Dld cradle washer, Dld
ñshIng poles, Dld wooden asparagus buncher, Dld wooden cheese press, Dld wooden log measurer, Dne bottom plow,
Dx collar, Ponace rake, PrImItIve wood knIfe, PurIna feed bucket, FaIlroad fork message devIces, FaIlroad torches,
Foot E vegetable cutter, Found wood wash stand, Found wooden butter churn, Fug beaters, Salesman sample wash
machIne, Sausage presses, Sausage stuffers, ServIce washer/Ceneva, SlIttIng gauge, Small antIque harp, Small red
glass ñre extInguIsher, Small wood burnIng stove, SpInnIng wheel head, TIn dInner buckets, TIn lamps E lantern,
Tobacco cutter, TurpentIne slasher, Two man saw, Two popper angle lamp, Wapak cast Iron skIllets #8·9 E #17, Wapak
sad Iron #8, Wash boards, Whale oIl lamp, Wooden buggIe seat, Wooden butter makers·pat. 1870, Wooden handle
butter press, Wooden handle sausage stuffers, Wooden mop wrInger·New York, Wooden planes, Wooden Ponacel rakes,
Wooden shovels, Wooden slaw cutters, Wooden sock stretchers, Wooden stock cutter (red), Wooden wheelbarrow,
Wooden wool strInger, Yarn wInder, |any ChrIstmas decoratIons, bow maker.
Come 8 en]oy c couple o] dcys o] Hoosìer Hospìtclìty
(*
Terms - Cash or Cood Check - "No ßuyers Premìum"
{260} 724-8899
Visit our website: www.town-countryauctions.com
Mr & Mrs Wayne Byerly, Owners
DAVE MYERS AU01045029
CHARLIE HILL AU10700054
KIRT McLELAND AU11000038
LEROYYODER AU01014642
816 W. Monroe St., Decatur, Indiana
Friday, January 25, 2013 ¶ 5:00 P.M.
8aturday, January 26, 2013 ¶ 9:00 A.M.
Plenty o] Pcrkìny - Hected 8uìldìny - Lunch by 1cnet's Dcsìs - Restrooms - Not Responsìble ]or Accìdents
2 0ays
ºByerly Auction"
ºAntiques - Antiques - Antiques"
Ajter travellìny 8 collectìny antìques jor over 45 years,
the ßyerlys have decìded to downsìze
Located at the Adams County 4-H Faìryrounds (Commercìal ßuìldìny), Monroe, lndìana,
or South oj Fort Wayne, lndìana's 469 ßyµass, on US 27, 19 mìles (throuyh 0ecatur) to the ìntersectìon oj US 27
8 124. Turn lejt (or East)1 mìle to Faìryrounds - "watch jor sìyns."
$17,48(6&2//(&7,%/(6
2 0oor cupboard, Coat rack, Floor lamp, Dak sIde board, Phonograph, PIe sale, Fed felt chaIr, Fed love seat sofa,
ShavIng cupboard, Small oak wardrobe, 7Ictor red sofa, WhIte faIntIng couch, Wooden book case, Wooden rocker,
1890 HorIzontal hand drIll, J Prong wooden fork, Agar boxes, AmerIcan SettentrIonale wooden map·1688, Angle
chInners, Angle elboard parts, Apple butter presses, Apple butter stIrrer, Apple copper kettle, 8arn beam augers,
8arrell butter churn·pat.1890, 8entwood churn·Wapak DH, 8oss E Acme barrel butter churn, 8rass E copper ßy
sprayers, 8rass sleIgh bells, 8uck saws, 8uckeye metal tractor seat, HoosIer metal tractor seat, |Ilwaukee metal
tractor seat, 8urgular alarm from ToscIn 8ank, (2) 8utter churn #40, 8utter makers, Candle molds, Cast Iron chImney
covers, Cast Iron coffee grInder·1845, Cast Iron spIttoon, Clothes dryIng racks·1891, Copper kettle, Corn jobber, Corn
sheller, Cow bells, Cradle scythe, Crocks of all sIzes, Cross wooden grape press, 0aIsy butter churn #J, 0Iamond corn
sheller, 0Inner bells (1·J·4·5), 0ouble handle cranberry scoop, Fly traps, FruIt jar holder, FruIt press, Class butter
churns (sIze J·4·6·8), Class ñre extInguIshers, Coat cart, Coose neck broad ax, Crey granIte oIl burner, CrIswald cast
Iron pots, CrIswald corn bread pan, CWT lamp, Hamburger patty press·1881, Hand school bells, HangIng kerosene
brass 8EH lamp·pat. 1894 E 1896, HangIng kerosene Cone WIth the WInd lamp, HangIng kerosene lamp w/black
bracket, HangIng kerosene lamp w/black bracket E smoke top·pat. 1871, The Fochester hangIng kerosene brass
lamp·pat. 1887, Harness stItcher, Hay cutters, Hay knIves, Hobnob crystal glassware, Hog scrapers, Horse collar
w/mIrror, Horse drawn stage coach, Ìce tongs, ÌndIan stones, ÌndIan stone axes, Ìron pItcher E bowl, Kane cutter,
Keen cutter straIght razor, Kerosene lamps, Kleen cutter hatch key, Lace doIllIes·curtaIns·tablecloths, LadIes Home
Journal pattern box, Lard press, Large apple press, Large copper kettle, Large ßat top wooden trunk, Large slaw
cutter, Large spInnIng wheel, Large tIn candle holder, Large wooden dough bowl, Leather stand, |aId FIte wash
board, |any mIlk glass bowls E dIshes, WhItley |etal tractor seat, |Iner's lamp, |InIature kerosene lamps, |InIature
Wapak wafße Iron, New York Central oIl can, Dak wall phone, DIl cans, Dld corn planter, Dld cradle washer, Dld
ñshIng poles, Dld wooden asparagus buncher, Dld wooden cheese press, Dld wooden log measurer, Dne bottom plow,
Dx collar, Ponace rake, PrImItIve wood knIfe, PurIna feed bucket, FaIlroad fork message devIces, FaIlroad torches,
Foot E vegetable cutter, Found wood wash stand, Found wooden butter churn, Fug beaters, Salesman sample wash
machIne, Sausage presses, Sausage stuffers, ServIce washer/Ceneva, SlIttIng gauge, Small antIque harp, Small red
glass ñre extInguIsher, Small wood burnIng stove, SpInnIng wheel head, TIn dInner buckets, TIn lamps E lantern,
Tobacco cutter, TurpentIne slasher, Two man saw, Two popper angle lamp, Wapak cast Iron skIllets #8·9 E #17, Wapak
sad Iron #8, Wash boards, Whale oIl lamp, Wooden buggIe seat, Wooden butter makers·pat. 1870, Wooden handle
butter press, Wooden handle sausage stuffers, Wooden mop wrInger·New York, Wooden planes, Wooden Ponacel rakes,
Wooden shovels, Wooden slaw cutters, Wooden sock stretchers, Wooden stock cutter (red), Wooden wheelbarrow,
Wooden wool strInger, Yarn wInder, |any ChrIstmas decoratIons, bow maker.
Come 8 en]oy c couple o] dcys o] Hoosìer Hospìtclìty
(*
Terms - Cash or Cood Check - "No ßuyers Premìum"
{260} 724-8899
Visit our website: www.town-countryauctions.com
Mr & Mrs Wayne Byerly, Owners
DAVE MYERS AU01045029
CHARLIE HILL AU10700054
KIRT McLELAND AU11000038
LEROYYODER AU01014642
816 W. Monroe St., Decatur, Indiana
Friday, January 25, 2013 ¶ 5:00 P.M.
8aturday, January 26, 2013 ¶ 9:00 A.M.
Plenty o] Pcrkìny - Hected 8uìldìny - Lunch by 1cnet's Dcsìs - Restrooms - Not Responsìble ]or Accìdents
2 0ays
ºByerly Auction"
ºAntiques - Antiques - Antiques"
Ajter travellìny 8 collectìny antìques jor over 45 years,
the ßyerlys have decìded to downsìze
Located at the Adams County 4-H Faìryrounds (Commercìal ßuìldìny), Monroe, lndìana,
or South oj Fort Wayne, lndìana's 469 ßyµass, on US 27, 19 mìles (throuyh 0ecatur) to the ìntersectìon oj US 27
8 124. Turn lejt (or East)1 mìle to Faìryrounds - "watch jor sìyns."
$17,48(6&2//(&7,%/(6
2 0oor cupboard, Coat rack, Floor lamp, Dak sIde board, Phonograph, PIe sale, Fed felt chaIr, Fed love seat sofa,
ShavIng cupboard, Small oak wardrobe, 7Ictor red sofa, WhIte faIntIng couch, Wooden book case, Wooden rocker,
1890 HorIzontal hand drIll, J Prong wooden fork, Agar boxes, AmerIcan SettentrIonale wooden map·1688, Angle
chInners, Angle elboard parts, Apple butter presses, Apple butter stIrrer, Apple copper kettle, 8arn beam augers,
8arrell butter churn·pat.1890, 8entwood churn·Wapak DH, 8oss E Acme barrel butter churn, 8rass E copper ßy
sprayers, 8rass sleIgh bells, 8uck saws, 8uckeye metal tractor seat, HoosIer metal tractor seat, |Ilwaukee metal
tractor seat, 8urgular alarm from ToscIn 8ank, (2) 8utter churn #40, 8utter makers, Candle molds, Cast Iron chImney
covers, Cast Iron coffee grInder·1845, Cast Iron spIttoon, Clothes dryIng racks·1891, Copper kettle, Corn jobber, Corn
sheller, Cow bells, Cradle scythe, Crocks of all sIzes, Cross wooden grape press, 0aIsy butter churn #J, 0Iamond corn
sheller, 0Inner bells (1·J·4·5), 0ouble handle cranberry scoop, Fly traps, FruIt jar holder, FruIt press, Class butter
churns (sIze J·4·6·8), Class ñre extInguIshers, Coat cart, Coose neck broad ax, Crey granIte oIl burner, CrIswald cast
Iron pots, CrIswald corn bread pan, CWT lamp, Hamburger patty press·1881, Hand school bells, HangIng kerosene
brass 8EH lamp·pat. 1894 E 1896, HangIng kerosene Cone WIth the WInd lamp, HangIng kerosene lamp w/black
bracket, HangIng kerosene lamp w/black bracket E smoke top·pat. 1871, The Fochester hangIng kerosene brass
lamp·pat. 1887, Harness stItcher, Hay cutters, Hay knIves, Hobnob crystal glassware, Hog scrapers, Horse collar
w/mIrror, Horse drawn stage coach, Ìce tongs, ÌndIan stones, ÌndIan stone axes, Ìron pItcher E bowl, Kane cutter,
Keen cutter straIght razor, Kerosene lamps, Kleen cutter hatch key, Lace doIllIes·curtaIns·tablecloths, LadIes Home
Journal pattern box, Lard press, Large apple press, Large copper kettle, Large ßat top wooden trunk, Large slaw
cutter, Large spInnIng wheel, Large tIn candle holder, Large wooden dough bowl, Leather stand, |aId FIte wash
board, |any mIlk glass bowls E dIshes, WhItley |etal tractor seat, |Iner's lamp, |InIature kerosene lamps, |InIature
Wapak wafße Iron, New York Central oIl can, Dak wall phone, DIl cans, Dld corn planter, Dld cradle washer, Dld
ñshIng poles, Dld wooden asparagus buncher, Dld wooden cheese press, Dld wooden log measurer, Dne bottom plow,
Dx collar, Ponace rake, PrImItIve wood knIfe, PurIna feed bucket, FaIlroad fork message devIces, FaIlroad torches,
Foot E vegetable cutter, Found wood wash stand, Found wooden butter churn, Fug beaters, Salesman sample wash
machIne, Sausage presses, Sausage stuffers, ServIce washer/Ceneva, SlIttIng gauge, Small antIque harp, Small red
glass ñre extInguIsher, Small wood burnIng stove, SpInnIng wheel head, TIn dInner buckets, TIn lamps E lantern,
Tobacco cutter, TurpentIne slasher, Two man saw, Two popper angle lamp, Wapak cast Iron skIllets #8·9 E #17, Wapak
sad Iron #8, Wash boards, Whale oIl lamp, Wooden buggIe seat, Wooden butter makers·pat. 1870, Wooden handle
butter press, Wooden handle sausage stuffers, Wooden mop wrInger·New York, Wooden planes, Wooden Ponacel rakes,
Wooden shovels, Wooden slaw cutters, Wooden sock stretchers, Wooden stock cutter (red), Wooden wheelbarrow,
Wooden wool strInger, Yarn wInder, |any ChrIstmas decoratIons, bow maker.
Come 8 en]oy c couple o] dcys o] Hoosìer Hospìtclìty
(*
Terms - Cash or Cood Check - "No ßuyers Premìum"
{260} 724-8899
Visit our website: www.town-countryauctions.com
Mr & Mrs Wayne Byerly, Owners
DAVE MYERS AU01045029
CHARLIE HILL AU10700054
KIRT McLELAND AU11000038
LEROYYODER AU01014642
816 W. Monroe St., Decatur, Indiana
Friday, January 25, 2013 ¶ 5:00 P.M.
8aturday, January 26, 2013 ¶ 9:00 A.M.
Plenty o] Pcrkìny - Hected 8uìldìny - Lunch by 1cnet's Dcsìs - Restrooms - Not Responsìble ]or Accìdents
2 0ays
ºByerly Auction"
ºAntiques - Antiques - Antiques"
Ajter travellìny 8 collectìny antìques jor over 45 years,
the ßyerlys have decìded to downsìze
Located at the Adams County 4-H Faìryrounds (Commercìal ßuìldìny), Monroe, lndìana,
or South oj Fort Wayne, lndìana's 469 ßyµass, on US 27, 19 mìles (throuyh 0ecatur) to the ìntersectìon oj US 27
8 124. Turn lejt (or East)1 mìle to Faìryrounds - "watch jor sìyns."
$17,48(6&2//(&7,%/(6
2 0oor cupboard, Coat rack, Floor lamp, Dak sIde board, Phonograph, PIe sale, Fed felt chaIr, Fed love seat sofa,
ShavIng cupboard, Small oak wardrobe, 7Ictor red sofa, WhIte faIntIng couch, Wooden book case, Wooden rocker,
1890 HorIzontal hand drIll, J Prong wooden fork, Agar boxes, AmerIcan SettentrIonale wooden map·1688, Angle
chInners, Angle elboard parts, Apple butter presses, Apple butter stIrrer, Apple copper kettle, 8arn beam augers,
8arrell butter churn·pat.1890, 8entwood churn·Wapak DH, 8oss E Acme barrel butter churn, 8rass E copper ßy
sprayers, 8rass sleIgh bells, 8uck saws, 8uckeye metal tractor seat, HoosIer metal tractor seat, |Ilwaukee metal
tractor seat, 8urgular alarm from ToscIn 8ank, (2) 8utter churn #40, 8utter makers, Candle molds, Cast Iron chImney
covers, Cast Iron coffee grInder·1845, Cast Iron spIttoon, Clothes dryIng racks·1891, Copper kettle, Corn jobber, Corn
sheller, Cow bells, Cradle scythe, Crocks of all sIzes, Cross wooden grape press, 0aIsy butter churn #J, 0Iamond corn
sheller, 0Inner bells (1·J·4·5), 0ouble handle cranberry scoop, Fly traps, FruIt jar holder, FruIt press, Class butter
churns (sIze J·4·6·8), Class ñre extInguIshers, Coat cart, Coose neck broad ax, Crey granIte oIl burner, CrIswald cast
Iron pots, CrIswald corn bread pan, CWT lamp, Hamburger patty press·1881, Hand school bells, HangIng kerosene
brass 8EH lamp·pat. 1894 E 1896, HangIng kerosene Cone WIth the WInd lamp, HangIng kerosene lamp w/black
bracket, HangIng kerosene lamp w/black bracket E smoke top·pat. 1871, The Fochester hangIng kerosene brass
lamp·pat. 1887, Harness stItcher, Hay cutters, Hay knIves, Hobnob crystal glassware, Hog scrapers, Horse collar
w/mIrror, Horse drawn stage coach, Ìce tongs, ÌndIan stones, ÌndIan stone axes, Ìron pItcher E bowl, Kane cutter,
Keen cutter straIght razor, Kerosene lamps, Kleen cutter hatch key, Lace doIllIes·curtaIns·tablecloths, LadIes Home
Journal pattern box, Lard press, Large apple press, Large copper kettle, Large ßat top wooden trunk, Large slaw
cutter, Large spInnIng wheel, Large tIn candle holder, Large wooden dough bowl, Leather stand, |aId FIte wash
board, |any mIlk glass bowls E dIshes, WhItley |etal tractor seat, |Iner's lamp, |InIature kerosene lamps, |InIature
Wapak wafße Iron, New York Central oIl can, Dak wall phone, DIl cans, Dld corn planter, Dld cradle washer, Dld
ñshIng poles, Dld wooden asparagus buncher, Dld wooden cheese press, Dld wooden log measurer, Dne bottom plow,
Dx collar, Ponace rake, PrImItIve wood knIfe, PurIna feed bucket, FaIlroad fork message devIces, FaIlroad torches,
Foot E vegetable cutter, Found wood wash stand, Found wooden butter churn, Fug beaters, Salesman sample wash
machIne, Sausage presses, Sausage stuffers, ServIce washer/Ceneva, SlIttIng gauge, Small antIque harp, Small red
glass ñre extInguIsher, Small wood burnIng stove, SpInnIng wheel head, TIn dInner buckets, TIn lamps E lantern,
Tobacco cutter, TurpentIne slasher, Two man saw, Two popper angle lamp, Wapak cast Iron skIllets #8·9 E #17, Wapak
sad Iron #8, Wash boards, Whale oIl lamp, Wooden buggIe seat, Wooden butter makers·pat. 1870, Wooden handle
butter press, Wooden handle sausage stuffers, Wooden mop wrInger·New York, Wooden planes, Wooden Ponacel rakes,
Wooden shovels, Wooden slaw cutters, Wooden sock stretchers, Wooden stock cutter (red), Wooden wheelbarrow,
Wooden wool strInger, Yarn wInder, |any ChrIstmas decoratIons, bow maker.
Come 8 en]oy c couple o] dcys o] Hoosìer Hospìtclìty
(*
Terms - Cash or Cood Check - "No ßuyers Premìum"
• Accepting 50 HD of “Quality” driving horses, draft
horses, & ponies.
• Stallion Presentations Welcome.
• Quality Horse Drawn Farm Machinery, Produce
Equipment, Buggies, Road Carts, Pony Carts, Etc.
• “Quality” New and Used Furniture, Maytag wash
machines, Shop Tools,
• Lawn & Garden Tools
• Already Consigned: Quality Driving Horses From
Longtime Dealer Timothy Schwartz, From Matthew
Wickey, Melvin Hilty, and others.
• New Furniture From Hilty Cabinet LLC.
• 2 – child size chairs
• Brand New Kitchen Tables, Etc.
• Brand New Cherry China Cupboard from Ver-Lyd
Custom Cabinet LLC
• New Tack & Nail Bags from L-J Leather Works,
Mel’s Harness, and Others
• Nice Maytag washing machines from Joe. M.
Schwartz, also Marvin Eicher.
_________________________________
Accepting Consignments every evening that week
from 4:00 to 8:00, Plus all day Thursday and
Friday ‘Til Noon.
_________________________________
No Shoeing Thursday and Friday Aug. 8th & 9th
_________________________________
Coggins Test Required for out of state horses.
_________________________________
Terms: Cash or good check. Not responsible for Accidents
or Lost or Stolen Items. No checks written under $5.00.
Any announcements made day of auction take precedence
over printed matter.
Consignment Auction at the E & M Blacksmith Shop
Friday Evening, August 9, 2013 @ 4pm
Location: 2.5 Mi. North of Berne to RD 350 S the West 1.5 Mi. (2404 W 350 S)
John Wickey Stallion Fee Consignment
(Donated to Blue Creek School)
Hilty Cabinet Consignment
French Township Wood Shop Consignment
Mose Graber Consigment Ver-Lyd Custom Cabinets
CONTACTS
Dave
260-223-3700
Charlie
260-341-4987
Kirt
260-223-1156
816 W. Monroe St. • (260) 724-8899
AC30900135
DAVE MYERS
AU0145029
CHARLIE HILL
AU10700054
KIRT McLELAND
AU11000038
2nd
Semi Annual
Friday Night
Special On The
Menu:
• Barbecued Chicken
• Mashed Potatoes
• Noodles
• Homemade Pie &
Ice Cream
Brand New Tack &
Harness
Mini Tack & Harness
Nailbags
Halters Leads
& Much More!
We Still Have
Openings for Horses,
Call Kirt to Reserve
Your Numbers @
260-223-1156
Bake Sale
For Bluecreek School
Vendors Welcome
Starting With Tack
@ 4pm
Horses Sell @ 6pm
Come Early As there
Will Be 2 Rings
Our newest Pets of the Week are Sophie, a white
Maltepoo, and Felix, a feisty tiger cat, who are worn
out from playing. Felix and Sophie were sent to us
by Glenda Holloway of Willshire, Ohio. Glenda said
Sophie and Felix are 6-years-old and still best bud-
dies! Thanks, Sophie and Felix, for being our Pets of
the Week!
Meyer ~ Duncan
Sense & Sensitivity
by Harriette Cole
Divorcing Woman Needs A Friend
DEAR HARRIETTE:
A friend just told me that
she and her husband
are getting divorced.
By the sound of it, the
divorce is very messy.
Her husband has a lot of
money and seems to be
wielding his influence in
big ways. She says that
he has turned most of
her friends against her,
and she is so sad and
fragile. As I listen to her,
I can tell that she doesn’t
know what to do. Neither
do I. I want to help her,
but I have no idea what
happened in their mar-
riage. I am not a law-
yer; I am just a friend.
What can I do to help
her? -- Helpless Friend,
Washington, D.C.
DEAR HELPLESS
FRIEND: The way to be
a good friend is to be
a good listener. Make
yourself available to talk
to her when she is in
need. Do not try to give
her advice; just hear her.
Do not get lured into
believing that you are
any kind of expert. When
she asks you questions
you do not know how
to answer, acknowledge
that you do not know.
Remind her that you are
there for her as a friend.
Suggest that she get an
attorney and a therapist
-- professionals who can
support her in different
ways.
DEAR HARRIETTE:
My godparents are get-
ting up in age, and I feel
bad because I haven’t
kept in touch with them
enough. I got busy
with my life, I guess,
and time just passed.
I learned recently that
they both are in not-
so-good health. I want
to reach out to them,
but I am embarrassed
because I haven’t talked
to them much over the
years. Do you think it’s
a good idea to call them
anyway? My mom thinks
so. I feel weird about it.
-- Hesitant, Silver Spring,
Md.
DEAR HESITANT:
Hesitate no longer. The
blessing is that your god-
parents are still alive.
The notion of a godpar-
ent is that the person
commits to providing
you with spiritual sup-
port in your life, espe-
cially if your parents are
ever unable to be there
for you. As with parents,
that role often flips as
godparents grow older.
Now it is your turn to be
there for these people
who committed to you
when you were born.
Absolutely do reach
out to them right away.
No need to feel guilty
for the past. Be in the
present. Tell them you
love them. Inquire about
them. Let them reveal
whatever they choose
about themselves. You
do not need to pry about
their health or anything
else. Just be there.
If you can visit them in
person, by all means do
that. And make the deci-
sion to stay in touch with
them regularly now. You
cannot change the past,
but you can become
actively involved in their
lives now, for as long as
they live.
Community Calendar
Pet of the
Week
Engagement
MONDAY, July 29:
Decatur Church of Christ food pantry, 700 E.
Monroe St., Decatur. 10 a.m.-noon.
A.A. Big Book discussion, 7 p.m., Decatur Church
of God.
TUESDAY, July 30:
TOPS Club, 10 a.m., Riverside Center.
Operation Help food pantry for Decatur and
Monroe residents, 1-3 p.m., Adams County Service
Complex.
St. Mark’s United Methodist Church Food Pantry,
5-6 p.m. Families can receive food once monthly.
A.A., 7 p.m., First United Methodist Church.
WEDNESDAY, July 31:
Immanuel House, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 8545 N 500 E,
Decatur.
Buy school clothes
without busting
the family budget
With the beginning of
August quickly approach-
ing many parents in the
Decatur area are begin-
ning to think those four
dreaded little words:
back to school shop-
ping. Sure, parents pick
up little things here and
there for their children,
but back to school time
often brings about fears of
stretching the pocketbook
a little too thin. However,
by shopping smart and
concentrating on fashion
staples, it may be easier
for parents to buy every-
thing their children need
without busting the family
budget.
• Spread out purchas-
es. Shopping early allows
parents to make the most
of sales. Warm weather
clothing generally goes
on sale in July to make
room for new fall lines.
Considering the first few
months of school still may
be warm, short-sleeved
shirts will still have util-
ity and are generally less
expensive than sweaters
and sweatshirts.
Staggering purchases
also enables parents to
develop a clothing allow-
ance each and every
month instead of having
one large bill at a certain
point in the year. Parents
can even add to their chil-
dren’s wardrobes dur-
ing the holiday season,
when clothes tend to get
reduced again for holiday
sales.
•Don’tdiscounthand-
me-downs. It’s trendy to
recycle clothing and also
to be environmentally con-
scious by putting items to
good use again and again.
Aside from you and your
wallet, no one will know
if your child is wearing a
secondhand pair of pants
or a brand new pair. Many
school moms are anxious
to swap clothing with oth-
ers to lessen their own
financial burdens with
children’s clothing. Start
a clothing swap with a
group of friends, and you
may find you have more
than you need in the way
of clothes for the kids.
• Take stock of what
you already have. How
many times have you run
out to the grocery store for
a missing ingredient only
to find that very item bur-
ied at the back of the pan-
try? The same thing hap-
pens with kids’ clothes.
Before taking kids clothes
shopping, take inventory
of their closets. Have little
ones try on clothes to see
which items still fit and
which can be discarded
or donated. Make a list of
the items you need to cut
down on impulse spend-
ing at the store.
• Invest in the right
high-quality pieces.
Spending a fortune for a
trendy pair of pants that
may end up getting ruined
on the playground is not
the best way to shop for
kids’ clothing. However,
investing in a quality pair
of shoes that will last
much of the year is a good
investment. Know when
to splurge and when it’s
okay to shop at the dis-
count store.
• Stock up on staples.
A straight-leg cut of jeans,
some solid colored polo
shirts and an A-line dress
or skirt are some clas-
sic foundation pieces for
children’s wardrobes.
Such items tend to last
longer than trendy items
that may only last a few
months before the next
trend arrives.
•Learntolayer.Layering
items can make pieces
look like new by putting
them together in different
combinations. Layering a
summer T-shirt under a
fall hoodie gets use out
of two different season’s
worth of clothes. It also
enables kids to be com-
fortable during unpredict-
able weather.
• Leave it to the kids.
Parents often worry about
what other parents will
think of their own chil-
dren’s clothing. Children
do not typically worry
about such things until
their preteen or teenage
years. You may spend less
money on clothing simply
because your child has
a few favorite shirts and
pants he or she wears
over and over. That’s less
laundry for you and less
money you have to spend
on new clothes.
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 6A • Monday, July 29, 2013
4-H Fair Fun
MacKenzie Neher atop Chelee
A lazy day in the barn
The Cloverleafs asked for donations of canned goods...and got lots of them!
Hunter Rehm gets his face painted
Lining up for the moon bounce
Judge Tim Calloway at work
Intermediate kid goats up for judging
Photos by Rebekah
R. Blomenberg
A n o t h e r
Adams County
4-H Fair is
history and it
was a dandy,
given great
weather and
great crowds.
Here, in pho-
tos, is a look
back at the
2013 edition.
123456789101112131415
DONTCOUNTEVERYHOURINTHEDAY
MAKEEVERYHOURINTHEDAYCOUNT.
ADVERTISETODAY!
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
Page 2B
Sports
Scoreboard
Page 1B Monday, July 29, 2013
InsIde
MLB—Cubs 2, Giants 1...Indians 6, Rangers 0...Tigers 12, Phils 4...Royals 4, W. Sox 2 (12)...Dodgers 1, Reds 0 (11)
Page 2B
OLD SCHOOL RULES THE DAY—The Bellmont
Alumni squad defeated the current Squaws ros-
ter, 3-2, in a fundraising exhibition match at BHS
on July 17. The event raised $700 for new bags
for the Bellmont soccer team. From the Alumni
team Jessica Brewer scored a pair of goals with
one from Amy Butcher. Current team goals scored
by Amberly Gutierrez and Hannah Wellman. The
Alumni team roster seen in the picture is as
follows but not in order: Alicia Vonzile, Allyson
Tussing, Amanda Strickler Emenhiser, Amy
Butcher, Andrea Fruchte, Asia Lee, Beth Shaw,
Carrie Terveer, Christine Hakes, Erin Green, Jamie
Basham, Jamie Hakes, Jessica Brewer, Kaylee
Faurote, Kelly Gebhard, Kelsey Sanderson, Kirstie
Strickler, Lauren McConnell, Maci Bosch, Mikala
Quinn, Milissa Hammond, Natalie McConnell, Taylor
Kennedy, & Whitney Grote Hawkins. (Photo by Myra
INDIANA BOYS ON AN INDIANA TRACK—Hoosier native, Ryan Newman (left) takes a photo opportunity
with this year’s Coors Light girl after winning the poll at the Brickyard 400. Newman would go on to take
the checkered flag for his first race on the Indianapolis track. (Photo by Chris McCoy)
Hometown favorite Newman wins first Brickyard 400
By JENNA FRYER
AP Auto Racing Writer
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
A born and bred Hoosier,
Ryan Newman spent his
childhood racing every-
where from Anderson
to Winchester and every
short track he could find
in a state mad about rac-
ing.
He graduated from
Purdue and landed a
summer job working in
Jeff Gordon’s old race
shop in Pittsboro. One
of the perks? He got to
live in the shop and sleep
alongside the cars.
And like many
Indiana kids, he revered
Indianapolis Motor
Speedway, the track he
first visited in 1986 and
later accidentally stum-
bled upon NASCAR’s
inaugural 1992 test while
out buying tires with his
mother.
A win at the famed
Brickyard? That would be
a dream come true for the
South Bend native.
Newman made the boy-
hood dream a cool reality,
taking the checkered flag
Sunday to end a 49-race
winless streak in front of
his home state fans. His
parents, who fueled his
love of racing and took
him to the 500 as a kid,
joined him for his biggest
win in Indiana.
Newman was as cool
and collected in Victory
Lane as he was on the
track when he held off
Jimmie Johnson. There
were no tears, no quiv-
er in his voice and no
need to collect himself as
Newman was strangely
stoic.
‘‘I don’t show a lot of
emotion, I think every-
body knows that,’’ said
Newman, who likened the
victory to his 2008 win
at the Daytona 500. ‘‘I
had the same emotion,
the same thankfulness
I did when I won the
Daytona 500 because I
feel everybody that has
been a part of my racing
career — from people that
bought my racing uni-
form, bought me a right
rear tire, given us a credit
card to get to some race
track at some point in my
career — those are the
people that helped me get
to where I am today.
‘‘To me, it’s awesome
to be here at Indy. It’s
awesome because it’s
my home state. I’ve
raced go karts at pretty
much every go kart track
around here, been kicked
out of half of them. Those
are the things that make
it special. I think about
those things more than I
carry the emotion on my
cheeks.’’
So the emotion was
seen in father Greg, who
spotted for Newman on
Sunday, and his mother,
Diane.
Newman kept it togeth-
er during his celebratory
burnout and the drive
to Victory Lane, a hal-
lowed area that he twice
had to ask his crew over
the radio for directions
how to get there. He took
the customary ride in a
convertible around the
track with his wife and
two young daughters, and
happily bowed again and
again to kiss the Yard of
Bricks.
Sure, he smiled, and
shared some tender hugs
with one of his daughters.
But that was the most
anyone was getting out of
Newman, who had admit-
ted to getting emotional
after winning the pole
on Saturday but seemed
almost numb following
Sunday’s win.
‘‘I’m not sure (how I
feel) at this point. I know
it’s an amazing feeling,’’
he said. ‘‘I was more emo-
tional yesterday after win-
ning the pole than I was
two laps after doing my
donuts and everything
else today. I’m not sure
why. I took an emotion-
al hit yesterday. Just an
awesome day.’’
Newman beat Johnson
twice on this Brickyard
weekend, first when he set
a NASCAR track record in
knocking Johnson off the
pole in qualifying, then
Sunday with a fast final
pit stop to snatch the
win from the four-time
Indianapolis winner.
The two were the class
of the field — they com-
bined to lead 118 of the
160 laps — but it was
Johnson who dominated
the race and appeared to
be just a bit better. But
Johnson pitted from the
lead with 27 laps remain-
ing and it was a slow
final stop for the Hendrick
Motorsports crew.
Newman pitted after
that and took only two
tires to move into the
lead after the green-flag
stops cycled through the
field. The closest Johnson
would get to him again was
when he paid a congratu-
latory visit to Newman in
Victory Lane.
The victory comes as
Newman is looking for a
job.
Stewart-Haas Racing
has signed Kevin Harvick
to join the team next sea-
son, and team co-owner
Tony Stewart informed
Newman two weeks ago
he won’t be brought back
in 2014. It didn’t change
the post-race mood, as
Stewart hustled to Victory
Lane, lifted Newman
from behind and the two
shared a long embrace.
‘‘He just had an awe-
some weekend,’’ Stewart
said. ‘‘I kept looking up the
board and watching and I
was scared to ask where
he was at and how big
of a lead he had. I didn’t
want to jinx him. Just
really proud of him — he’s
a great teammate and an
even better friend.’’
Johnson, the Sprint
Cup Series points leader
who was hoping to tie
Formula One’s Michael
Schumacher as the only
five-time winners in Indy
history, finished 2.657
seconds behind Newman
in second.
‘‘There’s definitely dis-
appointment there, but
that’s racing. It happens,’’
Johnson said. ‘‘We win as
a team, lose as a team.
There’s been some late
race mistakes on my
behalf that have taken
race wins away from us.
Granted, not a major
event like this. We still
ended up second.
US wins fifth Gold Cup
By NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer
CHICAGO (AP) — Brek
Shea sure knows how to
make an entrance.
Just 42 seconds after
coming into the game
as a substitute Sunday,
Shea pounced after
Landon Donovan whiffed
a shot and poked the
ball into the net. His goal
in the 69th minute gave
the United States a 1-0
victory over Panama and
the CONCACAF Gold
Cup title. It is the fifth
Gold Cup title for the
Americans, but their first
since 2007. It also is the
first international title
as a coach for Jurgen
Klinsmann, who won the
1990 World Cup and 1996
European Championship
with Germany.
‘‘It doesn’t matter who
scored today,’’ Shea said.
‘‘We won.’’
The U.S. is doing a lot
of that lately.
This was the 11th
straight victory for the
Americans, four more
than their previous
record, and they likely
will leapfrog Mexico as the
best team from the North
and Central America and
Caribbean region when
the next FIFA rankings
come out Aug. 8.
When the final whistle
sounded, the Americans
on the field began cel-
ebrating while the rest
of the team raced off the
bench. Several players
jumped up and down, and
hugs and high-fives were
exchanged. Klinsmann,
who watched the game
from a luxury box after
being suspended for his
tirade over the officiating
in the semifinal, quickly
made his way down to the
field, pumping his fists in
the air as he walked.
But their performance
in this tournament is
likely to stay with the
Americans for a while. At
least until the next round
of World Cup qualifying
in September. Not only
did they outscore oppo-
nents 20-4 in the tourna-
ment — no other team
had more than 11 goals
— but they showed they
are deeper than they’ve
ever been, with one young
player after another step-
ping up.
And one veteran, too.
Despite his big whiff,
Donovan was selected the
tournament MVP. He fin-
ished with five goals and
seven assists, a particu-
larly impressive perfor-
mance considering it fol-
lowed a four-month sab-
batical over the winter
that cost him his place on
the national team.
Though Klinsmann
picks his roster based on
form, not reputation, he
acknowledged it would be
almost impossible to leave
Donovan off the roster for
the next round of qualify-
ing.
The only disappoint-
ment for the Americans
was the loss of Stuart
Holden with another
right knee injury. Holden
sprained his knee early in
the first half, and while
he will have further tests,
Klinsmann said after the
game that ‘‘it’s not look-
ing good.’’
While most expected a
Mexico-US final, Panama
had other ideas, upset-
ting El Tri twice on the
strength of its stingy
defense. Panama was just
as dogged against the
Americans early, crowd-
ing Donovan and Eddie
Johnson and not giving
the U.S. any space.
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Decatur Daily Democrat Page 2B • Monday, July 29, 2013
DDD SportS ScoreboarD
National League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 59 45 .567 —
Washington 52 54 .491 8
Philadelphia 49 56 .467 10 1/2
New York 46 56 .451 12
Miami 40 63 .388 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 62 39 .614 —
Pittsburgh 61 42 .592 2
Cincinnati 59 47 .557 5 1/2
Chicago 48 55 .466 15
Milwaukee 43 61 .413 20 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 56 48 .538 —
Arizona 54 51 .514 2 1/2
Colorado 51 55 .481 6
San Diego 48 58 .453 9
San Francisco 46 58 .442 10
———
Saturday’s Games
Washington 4, N.Y. Mets 1
Atlanta 2, St. Louis 0
Detroit 10, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 7, Miami 4
Milwaukee 7, Colorado 5
San Diego 12, Arizona 3
Chicago Cubs 1, San Francisco 0
L.A. Dodgers 4, Cincinnati 1
Sunday’s Games
Detroit 12, Philadelphia 4
Miami 3, Pittsburgh 2
Washington 14, N.Y. Mets 1
Chicago Cubs 2, San Francisco 1
L.A. Dodgers 1, Cincinnati 0, 11
innings
Colorado 6, Milwaukee 5
San Diego 1, Arizona 0
St. Louis at Atlanta, 8:05 p.m.
Monday’s Games
St. Louis (Westbrook 7-4) at Pitts-
burgh (Liriano 10-4), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 10-5) at
Atlanta (Beachy 0-0), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Hefner 4-8) at Miami (Ja.
Turner 3-3), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 7-7) at Chicago
Cubs (Samardzija 6-9), 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 10-4) at San Diego
(O’Sullivan 0-2), 10:10 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20
p.m., 1st game
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m., 1st
game
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 7:05
p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Arizona at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:35 p.m.,
2nd game
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05
p.m., 2nd game
Cincinnati at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10
p.m.
American League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 63 43 .594 —
Tampa Bay 62 43 .590 1/2
Baltimore 58 48 .547 5
New York 55 50 .524 7 1/2
Toronto 48 56 .462 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 59 45 .567 —
Cleveland 56 48 .538 3
Kansas City 51 51 .500 7
Minnesota 45 57 .441 13
Chicago 40 62 .392 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 62 43 .590 —
Texas 56 49 .533 6
Seattle 50 55 .476 12
Los Angeles 48 55 .466 13
Houston 35 69 .337 26 1/2
———
Saturday’s Games
Tampa Bay 1, N.Y. Yankees 0
Houston 8, Toronto 6
Oakland 3, L.A. Angels 1
Minnesota 4, Seattle 0
Boston 7, Baltimore 3
Cleveland 1, Texas 0
Detroit 10, Philadelphia 0
Kansas City 1, Chicago White Sox 0
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Yankees 6, Tampa Bay 5
Cleveland 6, Texas 0
Toronto 2, Houston 1
Detroit 12, Philadelphia 4
Boston 5, Baltimore 0
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 2,
12 innings
Oakland 10, L.A. Angels 6
Seattle 6, Minnesota 4
Monday’s Games
Tampa Bay (Price 5-5) at Boston
(Doubront 7-4), 6:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-8)
at Cleveland (McAllister 4-6), 7:05
L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-5) at Texas
(Garza 1-0), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Rogers 3-4) at Oakland
(Griffin 9-7), 10:05 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland,
7:05 p.m.
Houston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Detroit, 7:08 p.m.
Arizona at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Seattle at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Toronto at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10
p.m.
Midwest League
By The Associated Press
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
Bowling Green(Rays) 24 12 .667 —
Great Lakes(Dodgers) 22 14 .611 2
x-South Bend(D’backs) 21 15 .583 3
Dayton (Reds) 20 16 .556 4
West Michigan(Tigers) 17 17 .500 6
Lake County(Indians) 17 18 .486 6.5
Fort Wayne(Padres) 12 22 .353 11
Lansing (BlueJays) 12 23 .343 11.5
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Cedar Rapids(Twins) 24 11 .686 —
x-Beloit (Athletics) 20 15 .571 4
Quad Cities(Astros) 19 15 .559 4.5
Peoria (Cardinals) 18 17 .514 6
Clinton (Mariners) 16 19 .457 8
Wisconsin (Brewers) 15 20 .429 9
Burlington (Angels) 13 22 .371 11
Kane County(Cubs) 10 24 .294 13.5
x-clinched first half
———
Saturday’s Games
Dayton 5, Fort Wayne 2
South Bend 4, West Michigan 3
Lansing 4, Bowling Green 1
Great Lakes 7, Lake County 4
Peoria 4, Kane County 1
Wisconsin 9, Burlington 3
Cedar Rapids 5, Clinton 2
Beloit 8, Quad Cities 6
Sunday’s Games
Dayton 8, Fort Wayne 5
Bowling Green 7, Lansing 1
West Michigan 10, South Bend 7
Wisconsin 6, Burlington 5
Quad Cities 9, Beloit 1
Cedar Rapids 3, Clinton 1
Lake County 5, Great Lakes 4
Kane County 6, Peoria 3
Monday’s Games
West Michigan at South Bend, 1:05
p.m.
Fort Wayne at Dayton, 7 p.m.
Lake County at Great Lakes, 7:05
p.m.
Bowling Green at Lansing, 7:05 p.m.
Clinton at Cedar Rapids, 7:35 p.m.
Quad Cities at Beloit, 8 p.m.
Kane County at Peoria, 8 p.m.
Burlington at Wisconsin, 8:05 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Bowling Green at Dayton, 7 p.m.
Great Lakes at West Michigan, 7
p.m.
Lake County at Fort Wayne, 7:05
p.m.
South Bend at Lansing, 7:05 p.m.
Wisconsin at Kane County, 7:30 p.m.
Cedar Rapids at Burlington, 7:30
p.m.
Beloit at Clinton, 8 p.m.
Peoria at Quad Cities, 8 p.m.
Sunday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Designat-
ed RHP Jairo Asencio for assign-
ment. Recalled OF L.J. Hoes from
Norfolk (IL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Placed
1B Albert Pujols on the 15-day DL,
retroactive to Saturday. Recalled OF
Kole Calhoun from Salt Lake (PCL).
NEW YORK YANKEES—Placed
DH Travis Hafner on the 15-day DL,
retroactive to Saturday. Reinstated
SS Derek Jeter from the 15-day DL.
Signed OF Hideki Matsui to a minor
league contract and announced his
retirement.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—
Optioned LHP Tyler Skaggs to Reno
(PCL). Recalled RHP Chaz Roe from
Reno.
CINCINNATI REDS—Designated
RHP Greg Reynolds for assignment.
Recalled LHP Tony Cingrani from the
AZL Reds. Sent OF Ryan Ludwick to
Louisville (IL) for a rehab assign-
ment.
COLORADO ROCKIES—Optioned
RHP Collin McHugh to Colorado
Springs (PCL). Recalled LHP Jeff
Francis from Colorado Springs.
MIAMI MARLINS—Announced the
resignation of hitting coach Tino Mar-
tinez. Placed RHP Kevin Slowey on
the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Steve
Ames from New Orleans (PCL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Placed
OF Travis Snider on the 15-day DL.
Recalled C Tony Sanchez from India-
napolis (IL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS—Claimed
TE Mickey Shuler from Buffalo.
Agreed to terms with G Jonathan
Cooper.
BUFFALO BILLS—Signed OL
Antoine Caldwell and Tony Hills.
DENVER BRONCOS—Agreed to
terms with C Steve Vallos, pending a
physical.
Snedeker takes Canadian Open
OAKVILLE, Ontario
(AP) — Brandt Snedeker
won the Canadian Open
on Sunday for his second
PGA Tour title of the year,
closing with 2-under 70
for a three-stroke victory.
Snedeker took the lead
Saturday after second-
round leader Hunter
Mahan withdrew when his
wife went into labor, and
held on in the breezy final
round at Glen Abbey.
Mahan’s wife, Kandi,
gave birth to daughter
Zoe Olivia Mahan early
Sunday in Texas.
Snedeker finished at
16-under 272. The six-
time PGA Tour winner
also won the Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am
in February.
Dustin Johnson,
William McGirt, Matt
Kuchar and Jason Bohn
tied for second.
Johnson was tied for
the lead after a birdie on
No. 16, then drove out of
bounds and hit the lip
of a fairway bunker en
route to a triple-bogey 7
on the par-4 17th. He
finished with a 70.
McGirt had a 68, and
Kuchar and Bohn shot
71.
SENIOR BRITISH
OPEN
SOUTHPORT, England
(AP) — Bernhard Langer
and Mark Wiebe were tied
after two playoff holes in
the storm-delayed Senior
British Open when dark-
ness suspended play at
Royal Birkdale.
They will finish the
playoff Monday morning.
Wiebe shot a 4-under
66 to match Langer at
9-under 271. Langer had
a 70. They each parred
the par-4 18th twice in
the playoff.
Langer, the 2010 win-
ner at Carnoustie, blew
a two-stroke lead with a
double bogey on the final
hole of regulation after
hitting into a greenside
bunker. Minutes earlier,
Wiebe’s birdie putt at No.
18 came up short.
Corey Pavin, Peter
Senior and David Frost
tied for third at 6 under.
Pavin shot a 65, Senior
had a 66, and Frost a 70.
LADIES EUROPEAN
MASTERS
DENHAM, England
(AP) — Hall of Famer
Karrie Webb rallied to
win the Ladies European
Masters, making two
eagles in a 7-under 65
for a one-stroke victory
in the Ladies European
Tour event.
The 38-year-old
Australian, preparing
for the Women’s British
Open at St. Andrews, had
a 16-under 200 total at
Buckinghamshire. She
has three victories this
season, also winning
the Australian Ladies
Masters in February and
the LPGA Tour’s ShopRite
LPGA Classic in June.
Webb eagled the par-5
ninth and 14th holes.
South Africa’s Ashleigh
Simon was second. She
closed with a 69.
The Women’s British
Open starts Thursday on
the Old Course.
Isner downs Anderson in Atlanta Open
By MATT WINKELJOHN
Associated Press
ATLANTA (AP) — There’s
something special about
Atlanta for John Isner,
and the 6-foot-10 former
University of Georgia star
is something special in tie-
breakers.
The top-seeded Isner
beat 6-foot-8 South African
Kevin Anderson 6-7 (3),
7-6 (2), 7-6 (2) on Sunday
to win the Atlanta Open
in the tallest final in ATP
Tour history. Anderson
was seeded second.
The pro-Isner crowd
had to sweat during the
longest tour final — 2
hours, 54 minutes — this
season.
Nobody should have
been surprised that it
came down to tiebreakers.
‘‘This is a tournament
where I could have been
out in my first match. I
lived on the edge all week,
and seemed to come
through for the good every
time,’’ Isner said after win-
ning two of three tiebreak-
ers to push his ATP-best
tiebreaker record to 26-7.
Isner played at least
one tiebreaker in all four
of Atlanta matches (seven
total), and he played at
least one tiebreaker in 11
of 13 matches prior to
Atlanta, 17 overall.
When Anderson
snapped Isner’s streak
of 12 straight tiebreaker
wins to capture the first
set, there was cause for
concern. In all eight previ-
ous Isner-Anderson meet-
ings, the winner of the first
set won the match.
Anderson won the first
set tiebreaker, 7-3, as
Isner unleashed a couple
errant forehands following
his own serves.
Isner also found trouble
early in the second set.
Trailing 1-0, he faced a
triple service break. After
battling back to deuce
twice, he served Ad-out
only to unleash one of his
24 aces on the way to
holding serve. Isner had
95 aces in four matches.
He faced 11 ser-
vice breaks Sunday and
won them all, often with
aces. He missed on his
only chance to break
Anderson’s serve.
‘‘I had a couple chanc-
es,’’ the South African
said. ‘‘He’s proven him-
self to serve well when it
matters. He stepped it up
well.”
Cubs sweep Giants; Wood throws 4-hitter
SAN FRANCISCO (AP)
— Travis Wood pitched
a four-hitter over seven
innings and had a home
run among his two hits
in helping the Chicago
Cubs complete a three-
game sweep in San
Francisco for the first
time in 20 years, beating
the Giants 2-1 Sunday.
Welington Castillo
also homered for the
Cubs, who won their
third straight and fifth of
seven.
Pablo Sandoval drove in
a run for the Giants, who
lost their fourth straight
and seventh of eight.
Tim Lincecum (5-11)
had two hits in addi-
tion to pitching seven
innings. He gave up two
runs and four hits. He
walked two and struck
out a season-high 10.
Wood (7-7) allowed an
unearned run while walk-
ing four and striking out
seven. He was 1-4 over
his previous nine games
and has been involved in
10 one-run decisions.
Pedro Strop threw a
scoreless eighth, his 12th
consecutive scoreless
outing (10 2-3 innings)
since joining the Cubs
on July 2.
Kevin Gregg record-
ed the final three outs
for his 22nd save in 25
chances, and his third
straight of the series.
DODGERS 1, REDS
0
LOS ANGELES (AP)
— Yasiel Puig homered
with two outs in the
11th inning to give Los
Angeles the victory over
Cincinnati.
Cincinnati pitchers
set a franchise record
with 20 strikeouts.
Puig, Adrian Gonzalez,
Hanley Ramirez and
Tim Federowicz each
fanned three times as
the Dodgers established
their highest single-game
total for strikeouts since
the franchise moved from
Brooklyn to Los Angeles
following the 1957 sea-
son.
Puig drove an 0-1
pitch deep into the left-
field pavilion against
rookie Curtis Partch
(0-1) for his 10th homer
and 23rd RBI in 48 big
league games.
The NL West leaders
won for the 26th time in
32 games and extend-
ed their lead to 2 1/2
games over the Arizona
Diamondbacks, who lost
1-0 to San Diego.
Brandon League
(6-3) pitched two hitless
innings for the win.
YANKEES 6, RAYS 5
NEW YORK (AP) —
Derek Jeter homered on
the first pitch he saw to
give the Yankees a jolt
in his return from the
disabled list and Alfonso
Soriano made the cap-
tain a winner with a
game-ending single that
lifted New York over the
Tampa Bay Rays 6-5
Sunday to avoid a three-
game sweep.
Playing with Jeter for
the first time since being
re-acquired by New York
from the Cubs on Friday,
Soriano homered among
his first four hits with
the Yankees and drove in
three runs.
Mariano Rivera (2-2),
the Yankees’ fourth reliev-
er, got three groundball
outs in the ninth.
ROYALS 4, WHITE
SOX 2
CHICAGO (AP) —
Alex Gordon hit a two-
run homer in the 12th
inning and Kansas City
beat Chicago for its sixth
straight victory.
With no outs, Jarrod
Dyson on third, and the
White Sox infield in,
Gordon drove a 2-2 pitch
from Donnie Veal (1-1)
over the wall in center
for his first homer since
July 7 and No. 10 on the
year.
Aaron Crow (7-3)
tossed a scoreless inning
to get the win and Greg
Holland finished for his
27th save in 29 chanc-
es. Holland has convert-
ed each of his past 20
opportunities.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Monday, July 29, 2013 • Page 3B
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Col. Bud Day dies at 88
MIAMI (AP) — Retired Col. George ‘‘Bud’’ Day,
a Medal of Honor recipient who spent 5 1/2 years
as a POW in Vietnam and was Arizona Sen. John
McCain’s cellmate, has died at the age of 88, his
widow said Sunday.
Day, one of the nation’s most highly decorated
servicemen since Gen. Douglas MacArthur and later
a tireless advocate for veterans’ rights, died Saturday
surrounded by family at his home in Shalimar, after
a long illness, Doris Day said.
‘‘He would have died in my arms if I could have
picked him up,’’ she said.
Day received the Medal of Honor for escaping his
captors for 10 days after the aircraft he was piloting
was shot down over North Vietnam. In all, he earned
more than 70 medals during service in World War II,
Korea and Vietnam.
2nd body found in NY river tragedy
PIERMONT, N.Y. (AP) — A day after a bride-to-be
was pulled dead from the Hudson River, the body of
her fiance’s best man was found a mile downstream
Sunday, the second victim of a nighttime crash
involving a speedboat and a barge north of New York
City.
The deadly collision left the groom-to-be grieving
for his intended and his best friend, while facing sur-
gery for his own injuries as another friend is charged
with manslaughter — two weeks before the wedding
day.
‘‘I don’t think you can put words to what we have
to tell these families,’’ Rockland County Sheriff Louis
Falco said as he announced that a body believed to
be that of Mark Lennon, 30, the best man, was found
Sunday morning.
At the church where Lindsey Stewart and Brian
Bond, both 30, would have been married Aug. 10,
the pastor said their lives ‘‘were filled with hopes and
dreams, and that has been snuffed away.’’
Stewart, Bond, Lennon and three others were on
a speedboat that crashed Friday night into a barge
holding equipment for the construction of a replace-
ment for the Tappan Zee.
Tropical storm Flossie weakening
HONOLULU (AP) — Weather officials say Tropical
Storm Flossie is weakening as it slowly moves west-
ward across the Pacific toward Hawaii, but is still
expected to bring heavy rains and winds up to 60
mph when it reaches the state late Sunday night or
early Monday morning.
Although women performed what had been male-
dominated roles in plants all over the country during
the war, it was a Willow Run worker — one of an
untold number of women in its 40,000-person work-
force — who caught the eye of Hollywood producers
casting a ‘‘riveter’’ for a government film about the
war effort at home.
60th anniversary of Korean armistice
The 60th anniversary of the truce that ended the
Korean War was observed over the weekend in the
U.S. and on the Korean Peninsula.
In Pyongyang, overlooking a sea of spectators
mobilized in Kim Il Sung Square to cheer and wave
flags, leader Kim Jong Un saluted his troops from
a review stand. He was flanked by senior military
officials, the chests of their uniforms laden with med-
als.
In Washington, President Barack Obama observed
the day with a speech at the Korean War Veterans
Memorial on the National Mall, saying the anniver-
sary marks the end of the war and the beginning of a
long and prosperous peace.
‘‘Here today, we can say with confidence, that
war was no tie, Korea was a victory,’’ with 50 mil-
lion South Koreans living in freedom and ‘‘a vibrant
democracy’’ in stark contrast to dire conditions in the
North, Obama said.
—The Associated Press
Amazon.com is adding 7,000 jobs
NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon.com Inc. says it is add-
ing 7,000 jobs in 13 states, beefing up staff at the
warehouses where it fills orders, and in its customer
service division.
The company says it will add 5,000 full-time jobs
at its U.S. distribution centers, which currently
employ about 20,000 workers who pack and ship
customer orders.
The world’s largest online retailer has been spend-
ing heavily on order fulfillment, a strategy meant
to help the business grow, but one that has also
weighed on profit margins. The company said last
week that it lost money in the second quarter, even
as revenue increased.
Distribution center jobs are available in Phoenix;
Middletown, Del.; Patterson, San Bernardino and
Tracy, Calif.; Indianapolis and Jeffersonville, Ind.;
Hebron, Ky.; Breinigsville, Pa.; Charleston and
Spartanburg, S.C.; Chattanooga and Murfreesboro,
Tenn.; Coppell, Haslet and San Antonio, Texas and
Chester, Va.
The National Weather Service said Sunday that
Flossie could bring flash flooding, mudslides, torna-
does and waterspouts.
The service issued a tropical storm warning for
Oahu, Hawaii’s most populous island with the city
of Honolulu, to go along with previous warnings for
the Big Island, Maui, Molokai and Lanai. The warn-
ing means the storm represents a threat to life and
property.
Will Whitey Bulger’ take the stand?
BOSTON (AP) — Lawyers for James ‘‘Whitey’’
Bulger acknowledged he ran a lucrative criminal
enterprise that took in millions through illegal gam-
bling, extortion and drug trafficking. Now, they must
defend him against those crimes and charges of 19
murders at his racketeering trial.
But one big question remains: Will Bulger testify
in his own defense?
Some lawyers not connected to the case say Bulger
has too much baggage to testify, including a previous
criminal record and a long reputation as an orga-
nized crime figure. But others say Bulger’s case is
different because, at age 83, he knows he is likely to
spend the rest of his life in prison and may be more
interested in settling scores than being acquitted.
Rosie the Riveter’s factory threatened
YPSILANTI TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — The Detroit-
area factory where Rosie the Riveter showed that a
woman could do a ‘‘man’s work’’ by building World
War II-era bombers, making her an enduring symbol
of American female empowerment, will be demol-
ished if money can’t be found to save it.
The Willow Run Bomber Plant, a 332-acre former
Ford Motor Co. factory west of Detroit that churned
out nearly 9,000 B-24 Liberator bombers during
World War II, is slated to be torn down unless a group
can raise $3.5 million by Thursday to convert at least
some of the structure into a new, expanded home for
the nearby Yankee Art Museum.
‘‘The younger generation needs to know what
people went through and be able to go and see what
they did and how they did it for our country,’’ Larry
Doe, a 70-year-old Ypsilanti Township resident who
has given to the cause, said recently before joining
other donors for a trip on a B-17.
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FOR JUNK CARS,
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CALL JACK @
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Farmer’s
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picked, locally
grown, bi-color,
non-GMO.
Call 260-437-0504
Taking orders for
raspberries and
blackberries.
Please visit:
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879 E 300 N
Decatur, IN
Wanted: Fruit &
vegetable vendors
for das Marit Farm-
ers Market in
Berne. Call
589-2936
Apartments
For Rent
1 bedroom apart-
ment, utilities in-
cluded, $400.00
per mo plus de-
posit, No Pets
728-9957 Must
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2 Bedroom Apart-
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Laundry hook up,
Reasonable Utili-
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Parking. Call
260-223-4949
FOR RENT 2-bed-
room apartment
w/appliances. All
Carpeted, Nice Lo-
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now. References &
Deposit required.
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with 1 bath and all
appliances includ-
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many recently re-
modeled, for just
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ground level and
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by 522 S. 13th St.
for more informa-
tion. EHO
Building
Supplies
For Sale
Roofing- Half
Priced: Economy
Dimensional Shin-
gles $54 per sq, In-
terior Doors $5 &
up, Wood Interior
Trim 50% off.
www.Cardwell-
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3205 Madison Ave-
nue, Indianapolis
(317) 788-0008
Childcare
Needed
Child care needed
for 10 year old
special needs boy
of single parent. Af-
ter school care and
full time when not
in school, pay is
flexible. Call
702-338-9753
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Wanted
Certified Home
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loved ones. Experi-
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General
Help Wanted
Can You Dig It?
Heavy Equipment
Operator Training!
3 Weeks Hands On
Program. Bulldoz-
ers, Backhoes, Ex-
cavators. Lifetime
Job Placement As-
sistance. National
Certifications. VA
Benefits Eligible.
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Experienced cook
needed. Work with
a great team. Apply
within: Back 40
Junction
Help Wanted:
Open interviews
being held on
August 1st be-
tween 4-6pm at
Decatur Ace Hard-
ware for part time
salesperson. Must
be able to work
days, nights and
weekends.
INDIANA AUTO
AUCTION-- Is
Growing! We are
accepting applica-
tions for the follow-
ing positions: NET-
WORK SYSTEMS
ADMINISTRATOR:
Establish and
maintain network
evaluating perform-
ance; schedule re-
pairs as per sched-
ule; develop and
document system
standards. Recom-
mend/schedule re-
pairs to LAN. Main-
tain local website.
Associates re-
quired, BS pre-
ferred in IT related
field. MCSE or
MCSA a plus. IN-
SIDE SALES:
Great opportunity
for those interested
in a sales and mar-
keting career; be
the inside contact
for our
customers--old and
new! Position part-
ners with our sales
group to provide
customer support.
Customer service
experience and/or
inside sales back-
ground preferred
but can train the
right person. Must
enjoy extensive
telephone work; be
computer literate;
and able to be pro-
ductive with mini-
mal supervision.
CDL A & B DRIV-
ERS: Part-time, on
call, picking up
trucks for our bi-
weekly truck sales.
May involve some
overnight trips; no
week-ends. Hourly
rate. Bring current
copy of your BMV
record to apply. Ap-
ply in person to In-
diana Auto Auction,
Inc, 4425 W Wash-
ington Ctr Rd, Fort
Wayne: Mon, Tue,
Wed & Fri from
9a-3p. (A)
General
Help Wanted
MACHINIST
Large industrial re-
pair center located
in Wolf Lake, IN is
looking for a stable
experienced Ma-
chinist. Large
manual equipment,
experience a plus.
No CNC work.
Wage based on ex-
perience.
Please apply to:
bmrgroup@hot-
mail.com or call
260-635-2195
Part time child
care teacher
wanted for local
child care ministry.
Must be over 18,
love children and
be flexible and pa-
tient. If interested
call 260-724-8082.
Part time help
wanted on dairy
farm; milking posi-
tion.
Call 260-565-3736
R&R Employment
& R&R Medical
Staffing
NOW HIRING
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chanic; Mechani-
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Packers/Sorters;
Ban Saw Operator;
Maintenance Tech;
Sales; Semi-Trailer
Mechanic; Produc-
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General Labor w/
experience in tire
tread/repair; Man-
ual Machinist; Fork-
lift; RN; LPN; P/T
Dietary
Accepting applica-
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Classes starting in
August!
Apply online
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ment.com or call
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Reporter
The Deca-
tur Daily Democrat
is seeking an en-
thusiastic and hard
working general as-
signment reporter
for Adams County.
This is a fulltime
entry level position.
Responsibilities will
include writing
news and general
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coverage of as-
signed beat. You
must possess
strong writing and
photography skills.
Have some pagina-
tion experience us-
ing InDesign.
Knowledge of AP
style a plus. Send
Resume and writ-
ing samples to Ron
Storey, publisher,
Decatur Daily
Democrat, 141 S.
2nd Street, Deca-
tur, IN. 46733 or
Email to: pub-
lisher@decatur-
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For questions
please call
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Drivers
Help Wanted
25 DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
TMC Transporta-
tion. Earn $800 per
week! Local 15 day
CDL training. TMC
can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156
ATTENTION RE-
GIONAL & DEDI-
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Averitt offers Excel-
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Hometime. CDL-A
req. 888-362-8608,
Recent Grads w/a
CDL-A 1-5/wks
Paid Training. Ap-
ply online at Aver-
ittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
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CDL-A Drivers:
Hiring experienced
company drivers
and owner opera-
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teams. Competitive
pay package.
Sign-on incentives.
Call 888-705-3217
or apply online at
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om
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pay in industry plus
pay for perform-
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Monday, July 29, 2013 • Page 5B
Decatur Daily Democrat
F O R
S A L E
BY OWNER
3BR, 2BA, Newer appliances, furnace,
windows, well, septic, new roof, fireplace,
new garage door, 2 car garage, finished
basement, energy efficient, 1 acre with
mature trees, also orchard. Stateline 2 miles
North of 224, 8570 N 700 E Decatur
260-244-0240 amer.axle@gmail.com
134 Brandywine Lane 1845 sq.ft house w/
575 sq.ft 2 car attached garage. 3BR/2Bath.
Newly remodelled kitchen & bathrooms. New
laminate flooring. Vaulted ceiling &fire place
in living room. New stainless steel appli-
ances. Priced to sell! 260-223-0266
810 E. Monroe Street
BIGGER THAN IT LOOKS!!!
Beautifully landscaped, 4 bedroom, 1 bathroom
1348 sq.ft. ranch. Close to Bellmont High School.
Low property taxes, great starter home.
PRICED TO SELL!!! (260)223-7332
Home for sale in AC district Country
home in Adams Central district. Built in
2006. Approx 2300 sq. ft. with additional
Finished Basement. 2.02 Acres. 40'x80'
Barn with hayloft basketball court.
3 Bedrooms, possible 4th. 3 Full Baths.
Geothermal Heating and Cooling.
$265,000. 260-413-6696
Ranch Home for Sale. Anthony Wayne
Meadows. 3 Br, 2 Bath, 2 car garage, fenced
yard, 1571sf, new roof, heated floors, all
appliances included. 910 Yorktown Road
$133,900 OBO. Call 260-223-4455
3636 N. Shady Lane (Oakwood)
$250,000 Pictures and Description.
www.owners.com/WTW8442
4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 2 Fireplaces, 2
Kitchens, Finished Basement, Indoor Pool,
Elevator, Gym,Kennel, Wrap around
Driveway,...Everything Customized.
(260)724-7155
10195 N 200 E
Log cabin--1,800sq.ft. setting on 5
wooded acres, 3 possibly 4 bedrooms, 2
1/2 baths, utility room, full finishable
walkout basement, cathedral ceilings in
living area w/ catwalk, fireplace on main
floor and wood burner in basement,
geothermal heating/cooling, 40x63 pole
building w/ 14x14 overhead doors, 50x50
fenced kennel w/ 8x12 shed.
260-724-2783
3 Bedroom home on quiet street,
fireplace, refurbished hardwood floors
throughout, new doors, countertops and
linoleum, full basement. $65,000
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Thursday, August 1, 2013 @ 6:00pm
Kathleen Ann Mangine Estate
Auction to be held at the property on
100 W. just off US 27, just North of
intersection 900 N and US 27.
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday August 1st @ 6pm
Kathleen Ann Mangine Estate
Auction to be held at the property on 100 W just off US 27, just
North of intersection 900 N & US27
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday, August 1st @ 6:00pm
Karen Secaur-Owner
130 Wheat Ridge Ct., Decatur
North of Decatur on Monmouth Rd. to Piqua Rd.-turn left, con-
tinue to Honeysuckle Ln.-turn left, go to end of road, turn left on
Wheat Ridge Ct.
Household Items, Power Tools, Fishing Equipment, Lawn & Garden
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Friday, August 2, 2013 @ 5:00pm
Immanuel Lutheran Church
8538 N 500 E Decatur, In
Benefit Auction
Accepting new or good used donated items
Thursday Aug. 1st 9:00am-6:00pm and
Friday Aug. 2nd 9:00am-3:00pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
town-countryauctions.com
Friday, August 2, 2013 @ 5:00pm
Immanuel Lutheran Church
8538 N 500 E Decatur, In
Benefit Auction
Accepting new or good used donated items
Thursday Aug. 1st 9:00am-6:00pm and
Friday Aug. 2nd 9:00am-3:00pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
town-countryauctions.com
August 3, 2013 @ 10:00am (personal property) 11:00am
(real estate)
Heirs of The William C. Poulson Estate, David Brewer, Attorney
Bluffton National Guard, 500 E. Spring St., Bluffton, IN
Real Estate: 263.20 acres+/- of prime agricultural farmland.
Tract# 1: 98.96 Acres +/- Sect. 22 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 2: 71.47 Acres +/- Sect. 27 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 3: 40.77 Acres +/- Sect. 18 Harrison Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 4: 52.00 Acres +/- Sect. 10 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 5: Tracts #1 - #2 - #3 & #4 (As An Entirety)
Car-2011 Toyota Camry, Tractors-WD-45 & D17 A.C., Lund fishing boat w/
60hp Johnson & other items, Truck-1979 GMC pickup
Ellenberger Brothers
Saturday August 3rd
Personal Property 9am Real Estate 12 noon
Open House Monday July 22nd (5-6pm)
Tony & Lynn Fuentes
2646 E 450 S Berne, IN
Real Estate- Tract 1- 2646 E 450 S 3400 sqft home has 5 bedrooms,
2 car garage on 12+/- acres w/ 1/2 acre pond & much, much more
Tract 2- 2656 E 450 S 1900 sqft ranch w/ 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car
attached garage on 5+/- acres w/ pole barn, FarmEquipment, Tools
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Clocks, Collectibles & Antique Auction
Saturday, August 3 @ 9am
Krueckeberg Auction Complex
815 Adams St, Decatur, IN
Lg Selection of Antiques & Collectibles! 200 Clocks plus Clock Parts!
30+ Tables of Glassware & Primitives! Antique Toys-Furniture-Art!
THE OLD CLOCK SHOP
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Tuesday August 6th @ 5:30pm
Reginald Myers Estate
Lu Ann Garton, Personal Representative
265 Center St., Berne, IN
Real Estate- 2 bedroom home
Personal Property, Furniture, Glassware & Collectibles
Miz Lehman Realtors & Auctioneers
www.mizlehman.com
Tuesday August 6, 2013 @ 6:00pm Judy Hawkins Estate
3320 N Salem Road, Decatur, IN
From intersection US 27 & US 33, go East on US 33 to Salem
Road, turn South Approximately 1 mile, watch for signs
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday August 8, @ 6:00pm
Auction conducted at Hoagland Hayloft
15112 Brunson Road, Hoagland, IN
LAND AUCTION
3 Farms 94.07 Acres 5 Tracts
Farm One 18.02 Tillable Acres
Morton Road, Ossian, IN
Marion Township•Section 33•Allen County•3 Tracts
Note: Potential Building Sites
Only Minutes from Decatur & Ft. Wayne
Farm Two 51.47 Tillable Acres
Hoagland Road, Hoagland, IN
Marion Township•Section 24•Allen County 1 Tract
Farm Three 24.58 Acres
Winchester Road, Decatur, IN
Root Township•Section 28•Adams County•1 Tract
20+/- Tillable Acres + 4.58 Acres Hunting/Recreation
CKB Farms, LLC, Owners
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Friday August 9, 2013 @ 4:00pm
E & M Blacksmith Shop Consignment
2404 W 350 S
2 1/2 miles North of Berne to Road 350 S. Then West 1 1/2 miles
Shop Equipment, Farm Machinery, Lawn & Garden, New handmade
Amish furniture, horses, buggies, carts, etc.
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Saturday, August 10 @ 9am RE @ 11am
Real Estate & Personal Property Auction
604 Homestead Ave, Ossian, IN
Rose Ann Heights Addition
Property Backs up to Maplecrest Park
3BR 2BA Ranch-LR W/ FP, kitchen w/ center island, Formal
Dining Rm, Concrete Patio, 3 Season Rm, Finished 2 car Att.
Gar; 1530sqft
2002 Buick Lesabre, 1986 Buick Park Avenue, Husgvarna Model
2554 Lawn Tractor, Collectibles, Furn & Household, Appliances,
Lawn/Garden, Exercise Equip, Tools
Henry Miller Spinet Piano & Bench
Calvin J. & Lois A. Smith, Owners
Kevin Smith Power of Attorney
Cindy Waldman Power of Attorney
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
WiegmannAuctioneers.com
Saturday, August 10th @ 10am
Mark and Sandra Freadenberg
5640 E 1000N
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: Home and nearly 2 acres
Personal Property is selling online @ littlejohnauctions.com
Tom Bauermeister for Littlejohnauctions Inc.
Tuesday August 13th @ 6pm
Will Morrison, Julie Adkins, & Dan Luebke - Owners
Section 21 St. Mary’s Township
34+/- acres of woods
16+/- acres of tillable ground
50+/- acres
Farm Land
Krueckeberg Auciton & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Thursday August 15th @ 6:00pm
Wilma Jean Liby
1221 N. 2nd St
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: 2 bedroom home w/ garage & full basement,
fenced yard
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
August 15th @ 4pm RE @ 6pm
Butcher
1062 Russel St
Located South of downtown Decatur on Winchester St to Russel
to auction site
Open House August 5th 5-6pm
Real Estate, Personal Property, Antiques, Piano, Appliances, Lawn &
Garden, Household Items, Furniture
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
August 17th @ 9am RE @ Noon
Zephyr
195 State Line Road, Convoy, OH
Located East of Decatur, On US 224, To state line, then North
approx. 9 miles to auction site.
Open House August 6th • 5-6pm
Real Estate, Personal Property, Appliances, Lawn & Garden,
Household Item, Furniture
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Saturday August 17th @ 9:00am
Jerry & Sue Sprunger
646 Forest Park Drive, Berne, IN
Sale of Leather Furniture, Antiques, Collectibles, Tools, Garden
Tractor, Honda Mower, Tool Chest, American Fostoria, Flo Blu
Dishes, Generator, Pressure Sprayer, Garden Tools, Appliances
Miz Lehman Realtors-Auctioneers
260-589-2903. For complete sale bill go to
www.mizlehman.com or www.auctionzip.com
Thursday, August 22 @ 3:00pm
Don & Rebecca Henry
7030 Lortie Rd, Monroeville, IN
Personal Property, Household Items, Antiques, Power Tools,
Shop Equip., Tractor, Appliances, Farm Machinery, Furniture,
Collection, Lawn & Garden, Alpacas
Jerry Ehle
Schrader Real Estate & Auction
1-800-451-2709
www.schraderauction.com
August 23rd @ 10am
Decatur Mini & Self Storage
Various Locations in Decatur, IN
Personal Property
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Saturday, August 24 @ 9am
Located @10374 NW Winchester Rd., Decatur, IN
9am Farm Related Items 10am Tractors & Equipment
IH Tractors, IH Combine & Heads, Grain Heads, JD Corn Planter &
JD Grain Drill, Tillage Equipment & Wagons, Augers, Sprayer, Rotary
Mower, Backhoe, Snow Blowers, Trailers, Cub Cadet Mower, 6000
Bushel Grain Bin, Farm Related Items & Shop Tools
This Equipment has been well maintained throughout the years and
has been housed and is in field ready condition.
Mike and Carol Selking, Owners
Wiegmann Auctioneers, 260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
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Decatur Daily Democrat
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of sensitivity and boldness is likely
to outshine all of your other
achievements today, especially if
competition is involved.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- Much to your credit, you
aren’t apt to reveal any information
about a friend that could tarnish
his or her image. The wisdom of
your decision will pay off hand-
somely.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- Group encounters could
prove to be extremely enlightening
if you’re a better listener than you
are a talker. Chances are you’ll
learn more from other people than
you ever expected.
**
Astro-Graph
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Puzzle #2832-M
Medium
1 2 3
4 5 1 6
7 8
5 1 6 3 2
7 2 3 1
3 1 7 9 5
8 9
3 7 8 4
9 6 5
Decatur Daily Democrat Monday, July 29, 2013 • Page 7B
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Solution #2856-M
7 6 1 2 8 5 3 4 9
2 5 9 4 6 3 7 8 1
8 4 3 1 9 7 6 2 5
4 9 7 5 2 8 1 3 6
6 2 5 3 4 1 8 9 7
3 1 8 9 7 6 2 5 4
1 3 2 6 5 4 9 7 8
5 8 6 7 3 9 4 1 2
9 7 4 8 1 2 5 6 3
Beetle Bailey ® Mort Walker
THE FAMILY CIRCUS ®
by Bil Keane
THE LOCKHORNS ®
by Bunny Hoest and John Reiner
ZITS ® by Jerry Scott and Jim Burgman
THE BORN LOSER ® by Art and Chip Sansom
Blondie ® Dean Young & John Marshall
ARLO & JANIS ® by Jimmy Johnson
FRANK & ERNEST ® by Bob Thaves
BIG NATE ® by Lincoln Peirce
CRANKSHAFT ® by Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers
BABY BLUES ® by Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
THE GRIZZWELLS ® by Bill Schorr
RECYCLE
PLEASE
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 8B • Monday, July 29, 2013
129 E. Madison Street, Decatur • (260) 223-8853
Come And Get ‘Em
Homemade Coney Sauce
and
Delicious Hot Dogs
and
Steamed Buns
You don’t need to
drive to Fort Wayne
for Great Coney’s!
A non-profit business celebrating the lives of those with special
needs in our community & giving back to organizations supporting the gift of life!
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.: 11-6 • Fri.: 11-7• Closed Sat. & Sun.
1125 Southampton Drive, Decatur
724-7623
SALES AND SERVICES
Mon - Fri 8-6
Sat 8-3
www.facebook.com/klenks.sales or www.klenkssales.com
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217 N. 1st Street
Decatur • 724-3709
Mon. - Fri. 9-5:30 • Sat. 9-2
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The
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“I Work
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HEARTLAND AUCTION REALTY
227 S. 2nd Stroot º Dooatur, íN 46733
Jerry Hurst
Broker/Realtor
Coll 260-223-1405
Oííioo 260-724-3499
$
1
1
5
,0
0
0
416 Bollman Street º Decatur
Nice ranch home that is well taken care of. Home is
1752 sq. ft. in size. This home features 3 bedrooms,
1 full bath, 2 car garage, living room, family room,
kitchen, & open floor plan. New roof in 2012. Close
to Homestead Park. Quiet neighborhood & corner
lot. This home is located on the corner of Bollman
Street & Faurote Ave.
CORNER LOT
We’re just a bark or a meow away
to answer all your questions!
DECATUR
VETERINARY HOSPITAL
8010 N. US Hwy 27 • Decatur, IN • (260) 724-3807
Dr. Conrad, Dr. Meyer, and Dr. McKinsey
Senior Appreciation Day
is every Thursday!
5% off
your total bill for
Seniors 60 and older.
Grooming
Pet Food Choices
Health & Safety Tips
Toys & Accessories
Animal Shelter
Adopting a Pet
Wellness Exams
Vaccination Schedule
Spaying/Neutering PETS
Businesses
Working For You
sale
space for
Advertise with
The Decatur
Daily Democrat
724-2121
*8#b1
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Check Out Our Website For More Details
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• Many colors to choose from
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
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