Skip to main content

July 23, 2013

July 23, 2013

To view the E-Edition of the newspaper, please login. If you have not subscribed to the E-Edition, you can do so by subscribing here.

The rates for the E-Edition are:

1 day 99¢
3 months $18 for 90 days
6 months $36 for 180 days
12 months $72 for 360 days

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

U.S. Congressman
Marlin Stutzman’s
mobile office will be
open Wednesday in the
county commission-
ers’ meeting room in
the Service Complex in
Decatur.
A Stutzman staff
member will be avail-
able to assist Hoosiers
between 9 and 11 a.m.,
a press release said.
Sports physicals for your all-star, only $15!
Get ahead of the game and schedule one today.
Markle Medical Center is ofering sports physicals for only $15,
with full payment due at the time of service.
Call one of our four locations to schedule an appointment for your all-star today.
+ Blufton: 100 W. Horton • (260) 824-0800
+ Markle: 201 E. South • (260) 758-2156
+ Ossian: 105 Hillcrest • (260) 622-4707
+ Warren: 824 Huntington • (260) 375-2965
71214_BLUF_SprtPhys_10_5x2c.indd 1 7/3/13 12:16 PM
The Decatur Daily
Democrat
75¢ at newstands
Inside
Page 5A
St. Mark’s car
show hailed
as a success
An independent newspaper serving Adams County, Indiana since 1857 July 23, 2013 TUESDAY
IN BRIEF
The Progressive
Agricultural Safety Day
sponsored by Bungee
North America, sched-
uled for August 3 at
Worthman Field on
Adams St., has been
cancelled and resched-
uled for 2014, accord-
ing to an announce-
ment.
No further informa-
tion was provided.
Stutzman rep
to visit here
Wednesday
Ag Safety Day
cancelled; ’14
return on tap
State Fair
app includes
maps, events
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— The Indiana State
Fair has created a free,
new and improved
smartphone app that
puts its midway, 140
food stands, barns and
attractions in the palm
of a hand for iPhone
and Android users.
Fair spokesman
Andy Klotz says the
app has six interactive
maps with different cat-
egories of destinations.
They include exhibits
and attractions, food
vendors, first aid and
information stations
and baby feeding and
changing stations.
The app also includes
listings of fair events
and discounts for each
day of the event’s run.
This year’s fair runs
Aug. 2-18.
Contact Us
By phone: 724-2121
By Fax: 724-7981
On The Web
www.decaturdaily
democrat.com
On this date
In 1986, Britain’s
Prince Andrew mar-
ried Sarah Ferguson
at Westminster Abbey
in London. The couple
divorced in 1996.
In 2011, singer
Amy Winehouse, 27,
was found dead in her
London home from
accidental alcohol poi-
soning.
Today’s Birthdays:
Actress Gloria DeHaven
is 88. Supreme Court
Justice Anthony M.
Kennedy is 77. Ex-
White House intern
Monica Lewinsky is 40.
Fort Wayne to host GOP convention
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The
Indiana Republican Party’s
executive committee voted
unanimously Monday to elect
Auditor Tim Berry as the state
GOP chairman and to hold the
party’s 2014 state convention in
his hometown of Fort Wayne —
the first time the event has been
held away from Indianapolis.
The committee’s vote to select
Berry endorsed the choice of
Gov. Mike Pence as he puts his
personal stamp on the Indiana
Republican Party. Former
Chairman Eric
Holcomb is leav-
ing after nearly
three years in the
post to run U.S.
Sen. Dan Coats’
state office.
Berry will remain
state auditor until
Pence appoints a
new one. Pence said Monday he
has about six candidates and
hopes to make the appointment
by mid-August. He has said the
person he selects should expect
to seek a full term as auditor
next year.
The 2014 Republican con-
vention will be held at Grand
Wayne Center, which was also
the site of the Democratic Party’s
state convention last year. The
Democratic convention attract-
ed about 3,000 people to Fort
Wayne, the state’s second larg-
est city.
Republicans in Allen County,
where Fort Wayne is the county
seat, have been seeking the con-
vention nod for several months.
‘‘We’re absolutely ecstat-
ic,’’ Allen County Republican
Chairman Steve Shine told The
Journal Gazette. ‘‘It is a great
honor for the Allen County
Republican Party as well as for
Allen County itself.’’
The Indiana GOP has never
held its state convention out-
side Indianapolis.
Delegates to next year’s state
party conventions will select
nominees for three statewide
offices: auditor, secretary of
state and treasurer.
Berry
County-park board dispute escalates
By J SWYGART
On ongoing dispute between
the Adams County commission-
ers and members of the Adams
County Park and Recreation
board escalated Monday dur-
ing the commissioners’ regular
weekly meeting. And while no
resolution was reached to lin-
gering conflicts between the two
bodies — the biggest centering
around personnel and supervi-
sion matters — county park
board members said they hope
to present to the commissioners
a concrete plan outlining the
future of their department by
year’s end.
At issue are how person-
nel matters will be handled in
the county parks department
beginning in January of next
year upon the retirement of
Steve Krull — who currently
serves jointly as the supervi-
sor of the Decatur and county
parks and rec departments. It
has been agreed by the city and
county park boards
that Krull’s position
will not be filled.
The commis-
sioners reportedly
have questioned
county park board
president Phyllis
Hebble and other board mem-
bers about the future role of
Craig Krull, director of leisure
services for the county park
board and a county employee.
Hebble, along with park
board members Dick Stimpson
and Marc Ripley, were in atten-
dance at Monday’s meeting of
the county commissioners to
respond to some of those ques-
tions.
“I am here to try and straight-
en out any misconceptions
about Craig Krull, our full-time
employee,” said Hebble. She
claimed park board members
have been “harassed” by the
commissioners for the past year
or more, and further alleged the
commissioners “have declared
war on the Adams County Parks
and Recreation board” primarily
over Craig Krull’s employment.
“The Decatur and Adams
(Continued on page 3A)
Personnel, supervision are at issue
Craig Krull
WAITING ... Two girls
chat it up while waiting
to compete in the Horse
& Pony Show pleasure
classes on Monday at
the 4-H Fair.
ROOSTER TALK ... Logan
LeMaster, 13, discusses
his rooster with poultry
judge Tim Calloway of
Tipton during the poul-
try competition at the
4-H Fair on Monday.
LeMaster had the only
entry in the rooster com-
petition.
SELLERS ... Enie
Roe (left) and Shirley
Hormann, president and
secretary, respectively,
of the Adams County
Extension Homemakers
were selling cookbooks
in the fairgrounds din-
ing hall at the 4-H Fair
on Monday. Tonight, they
will be among club offi-
cers serving as grand
marshals of the parade.
Photos by Rebekah
R. Blomenberg
No opposition
to sewer rate
hike in Berne
By J SWYGART
A public hearing held
during Monday’s regular
meeting of Berne City
Council on a proposed
two-stage increase in
sewer rates attracted no
comments from city resi-
dents, setting the stage
for the first of those rate
increases to take effect
this fall.
The council two weeks
ago introduced legislation
to put in place the first of
two planned sewer utility
rate hikes to help finance
an estimated $3.9 million
upgrade to the wastewa-
ter treatment plant.
The city is under
orders from the
Indiana Department
of Environmental
Management to reduce
the amount of ammo-
nia contained in waste
water effluent that is
being discharged from
the treatment plant to
area rivers and streams.
Improvements must be
completed by 2015.
The city’s rate con-
sultant, Jeffery Rowe of
Umbaugh and Associates,
was present at Monday’s
public hearing and
reported that financing
for the treatment plant
improvements has been
assured. He said officials
from the State Revolving
Fund loan program have
ranked Berne third on
the agency’s project pri-
ority list for the coming
year. Rowe said SRF offi-
cials would prefer bids
to be awarded for the
project by Dec. 31 of this
year.
The city of Berne
decided earlier this year
to increase sewer utility
rates in part to finance
the improvement proj-
ect, and also to make
up for a deficit in the
sewer department that
has existed for years.
Rowe told the council
that a rate increase of
$3.50 monthly for aver-
age residential custom-
ers (those who use 4,000
gallons of water monthly)
would be necessary just
for the department to
reach a break-even level,
and that hikes rang-
ing between $14-16 per
month would be required
to fully fund the state-
mandated improvements.
The city council ultimate-
ly decided to implement
the sewer rate hike in
two stages: one expected
to take effect later this
fall, and the second to
be determined once bids
are received and the final
cost of the wastewater
treatment plant project
in known.
In phase one of the
rate hike, as outlined in
legislation introduced
two weeks ago, average
residential customers will
see their monthly sewer
bills increase by approxi-
mately $7. Rowe said the
first rate hike represents
a 32 percent across-the-
board increase.
Good weather for big night
It looks like some
nearly ideal weather will
be served up to 4-H Fair-
goers this evening as the
biggest night of the five-
day event comes up.
The National Weather
Service says chances of
rain are just 30 percent,
and that’s mainly before
5 p.m. Temperatures,
meanwhile, should be in
the 60s when the fair
parade kicks off at 7.
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 2A • Tuesday, July 23, 2013
LocaL/State
AROUND INDIANA
Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specifications may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. May not be used with any other promotion. Some special items may not be on display but are available via our special order program. *See store for details.
985 N. Main St., Bluffton • 260-824-1200 • 800-759-8795
HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.;
Fri. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
www.gerberinterior.com www.gerberinterior.com
$
999
What could be better than BIG Summer Savings on your favorite
name brands at Gerber Furniture? How about FREE Furniture!
$
959
Buy this Lane Sofa and Loveseat,
Receive
Matching
Recliner…
Buy this Lane Recliner,
Receive Matching Recliner …
$
599
$
799
Buy this Lane Sofa,
Receive Matching
Recliner …
Buy a Serta Perfect Sleeper
or Beautyrest Mattress,
Receive Boxspring…
F
R
E
E
D
E
L
IV
E
R
Y
INTEREST
FREE
FINANCING
S
A
LE
THRU
JULY 31
*
*
*
*
* Selected styles. See store for details.
LENGERICH
MEATS
3095 Van Horn Street • Zanesville, IN • 260-638-4123
www.lengerichmeats.com
Prices Good Monday July 22nd thru Saturday July 27th
Santa Fe Pork Steak $2.69 ea.
Pork with BBQ Sauce $3.59 lb.
Cooked BBQ Country Style Ribs $3.09 lb.
Ham Loaf Mixture $2.69 lb.
Luncheon Bologna $2.69 lb.
Fire Jack Cheese $4.09 lb.
Ham Salad $2.99 lb.
We Accept
Food Stamps
Hours: M-F 9-5
Sat 8-Noon
Whole or Half Hog - $1.89 lb.
Whole or Half Hog - $1.89 lb.
"you'll taste the difference"
Today
Adams Memorial Hospital Day
7 a.m.-10p.m. — Clover Center Open
8 a.m. — 4-H Swine Show
9a.m.- 9:30 p.m. — 4-H Exhibits Open
10:30a.m.-10 p.m. — Dining Hall Open
1-2 p.m. — Pedal Pull Registration
2 p.m. — Pedal Pull
3 p.m. — 4-H Horse and Pony Show
Jr. Contest Events
3:30 p.m. — Pedal Pull Finals
7 p.m. — Parade
After Parade 4-H Stage Event
Pedal Pull Awards
Grand Marshal Recognition
Outgoing Mini 4-H Members
4-H Ambassador Recognition
8 p.m. — 4-H Horse and Pony Show
Jr. State Fair Classes
Wednesday
Substance Abuse Awareness Day
8 a.m.-10p.m. — Clover Center Open
8:45 a.m. — 4-H Dairy Show
9 a.m.-9 p.m. — 4-H Exhibits Open
9 a.m. — Bingo at the Fair Registration
9:30-11 a.m. — Bingo at the Fair
10:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. — Dining Hall Open
11:30 a.m. — 4-H Goat Show
2-9 p.m. — Kids Fun Zone
5 p.m. — Jr. Leader Corn Hole Challenge
5 p.m. — 4-H Horse and Pony Senior Show
6 p.m. – 4-H Beef Show
7 p.m. — Stage Performance Razz M’ Jazz
8 p.m. — Adams County Has Talent
9 p.m. — Rabbits/Poultry Released
Thursday
8 a.m.-10 p.m. – Clover Center Open
9-11a.m. — 4-H Exhibits Open
9 a.m. — 4-H Supreme Showmanship
11 a.m.-6 p.m. — 4-H Projects Released
11:30 a.m. — Horse and Pony Awards
Noon — Horse & Pony Released
4 p.m. — 4-H Livestock Auction
4-H Fair schedule
WEEKLY THURSDAY — The Decatur Chamber of
Commerce’s farmers market is held each Thursday
from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. on the First St. parking lot at
Madison St. (Photo by Rebekah R. Blomenberg)
Three defendants
enter guilty pleas
Three defendants
appeared recently in
Adams Superior Court
before Judge Patrick R.
Miller.
Leon D. Lehman, 45,
Geneva, pleaded guilty
to possession of mari-
juana. He was sentenced
to a year in jail, all sus-
pended, and a year of
probation. Lehman also
was ordered to complete
addiction services/sub-
stance abuse counsel-
ing and a Responsible
Thinking and Choices
class, and to pay $578 in
court costs and fees.
Andrew M. Killebrew,
32, Indianapolis, plead-
ed guilty to operating a
vehicle while intoxicated.
He was sentenced to a
year in jail, all but 90
days suspended, and
was released with time
served.
He was given 275 days
of probation, and his
license was suspended
for 180 days, was ordered
to complete addiction
s e r v i c e s /s ubs t anc e
abuse counseling and
a Responsible Thinking
and Choices class, as
well as pay $548.50 in
court costs and fees.
Justine Miracle, 20,
Geneva, pleaded guilty to
theft. She was given a
year in jail, all but four
days suspended, and was
released with time served.
Miracle was also given
361 days of probation
and 30 hours of commu-
nity service, ordered to
complete a theft class and
a Responsible Thinking
and Choices class, as
well as pay $378 in court
costs and fees.
David A. Goins, 48,
Muncie, pleaded guilty
to violating probation by
incurring new charges.
Two years of his pre-
viously suspended sen-
tence were revoked, to be
served in prison.
4-H club taking canned
foods during the fair
Missing teen’s SUV found
The French Peppy
Peppers 4-H Club is hold-
ing a canned food collec-
tion during this year’s
4-H Fair.
The Peppers ask that
people bring canned
goods to the fair at any
time. A collection site is
situated beside the fair
office in the Exposition
Hall. The club will also
collect any canned goods
during the parade.
All donations will ben-
efit the Monroe Food
Pantry, an announce-
mente said.
FISHERS, Ind. (AP)
— Police say the SUV
belonging to a missing
18-year-old woman has
been found in a sub-
urban Indianapolis lake
with a body inside it.
Fishers police didn’t
immediately confirm that
the body is that of Peyton
Riekhof, but state police
have canceled a state-
wide alert seeking help in
finding her.
Fisher police spokes-
man Tom Weger says a
person spotted tire tracks
going through a neigh-
borhood lot into Geist
Reservoir on Sunday.
How did woman vote twice?
CROWN POINT, Ind. (AP) — Officials in a north-
west Indiana county are investigating how a woman
voted twice in a school referendum this spring.
Lake County election board attorney Jim Wieser
told The Times of Munster elections officials are
trying to determine how the county’s computerized
database failed to record the woman’s first ballot on
May 4 as an in-person absentee ballot. He says she
voted again on Election Day three days later.
The referendum to raise taxes passed easily.
Wieser says the woman has been advised to seek
legal counsel because she may be in jeopardy of a
criminal investigation. He says the board has yet to
hear from the woman about why she voted a second
time.
Kids ‘get booked’ by popular police
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — Children in South
Bend are ‘‘getting booked’’ by police in a program
that has them reading for rewards.
Officer Derek Dieter handings out books from the
trunk of his car as part of a community relations
program. The program called ‘‘Get Booked’’ chal-
lenges students to complete book reports. Once a
child completes five reports, he or she gets tickets to
events such as minor league baseball games.
Dieter told the South Bend Tribune he’s trying to
get kids to run toward his police car instead of run-
ning away from it. He wants them to see him coming
and not be afraid.
Gun accident kills teen
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An accidental shooting has
killed a 17-year-old boy in a downtown Indianapolis
parking garage, and one of his companions has been
arrested.
Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Sgt. Linda
Jackson says Darnell Franklin died at an Indianapolis
hospital after the shooting early Sunday at a garage
serving the JW Marriott and adjacent Courtyard by
Marriott hotels.
Jackson says the boy and five family members
and friends riding in the same vehicle had gone to
the hotel about 3 a.m. to meet some female friends
when a juvenile male in the back seat reached down
to pick up a gun from the floorboard with his fin-
ger on the trigger and accidentally discharged the
weapon.
The shooter faces juvenile charges of reckless
homicide and carrying a handgun without a license.
Big drop in synthetic drug overdoses
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indiana Poison Center
has seen big drops in the number of reported over-
doses from synthetic drug abuse since state laws
banning the drugs known by names such as ‘‘bath
salts’’ and ‘‘spice’’ took effect.
The latest poison center report shows an 86 per-
cent decrease in reported overdoses of ‘‘bath salt’’
drugs since 2011. That’s when Indiana’s first syn-
thetic drug ban was passed.
The center has had a 61 percent decrease in
‘‘spice’’ overdoses over the same period.
State Sen. Jim Merritt of Indianapolis sponsored
the laws that ban the distribution and possession
of synthetic drugs containing certain chemical com-
pounds.
125 years of basilica at ND
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — The University of Notre
Dame is preparing to celebrate the 125th anniver-
sary of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart.
A special Mass is scheduled for 4 p.m. Aug. 16,
followed by a reception. Bishop Daniel Jenky of
Peoria, Ill., who studied theology at Notre Dame, is
scheduled to preside.
The basilica serves as the oldest and principal
church of the Congregation of Holy Cross in the
United States and is the cornerstone of liturgical life
at Notre Dame.
The basilica is open to the public year round from
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. when school is in session and from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. during holiday breaks or when school
is not in session.
Heavy rain blamed for fatalities
BLOUNTSVILLE, Ind. (AP) — A heavy downpour
created dangerous driving conditions before an SUV
hydroplaned into an oncoming car, killing an eastern
Indiana couple and injuring five other people, a wit-
ness said.
The crash occurred after the SUV passed other
vehicles in a no-passing zone on U.S. 35 about 50
miles northeast of Indianapolis, witnesses told the
(Muncie) Star Press.
‘‘It was pouring down rain,’’ said Kathy Charboneau
of Ravenna, Neb., whose pickup truck pulling a rec-
reational vehicle was the last vehicle the SUV passed
before the crash Saturday. ‘‘It was pouring so hard
you couldn’t hardly see.’’
The crash killed the driver of the car, Claude
Hicks, 48, of Lynn, and his wife, Rhonda Jo Hicks,
52, Henry County Sheriff’s Deputy John Guy said.
Three other passengers in Hicks’ car — their son,
Joseph Hicks, and his children, a 9-year-old girl and
a 3-year-old boy — also were injured and remained
hospitalized Sunday in Indianapolis, Guy said.
The driver of the SUV, John Petry, 59, of Kettering,
Ohio, was treated and released.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Tuesday, July 23, 2013 • Page 3A For the record
Your Local Weather
Tue
7/23
84/68
Scattered
thunder-
storms, espe-
cially in the
afternoon.
High 84F.
Wed
7/24
84/61
Scattered
thunder-
storms possi-
ble.
Thu
7/25
76/57
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
upper 50s.
Fri
7/26
79/58
Mostly
sunny. Highs
in the upper
70s and lows
in the upper
50s.
Sat
7/27
81/62
More clouds
than sun.
Highs in the
low 80s and
lows in the
low 60s.
©2009 American Profile Hometown Content Service
From Decatur High 80 7 a.m. 70
weather station Low 65 River 3.55 ft.
Precip 0 Degree days —
Obituaries
CitatiOns
blOtter
Elizabeth Ann Bond
Elizabeth Ann Kocher Bond, 71, died of ALS on
July 16 at her home in Cypress Mill, Texas.
She was born in Decatur on April 7, 1941, to
James L. Kocher and Mildred Wolfe Kocher.
Both Ann and her husband Bill were graduates
of the class of 1959, DHS, and Indiana University
(Bloomington).
Among survivors are her husband, William H.
Bond; two sisters, Mary (Donna) Dygert, Somerville,
Mass., and Meg (Tom) Magnan, and a brother, John
Kocher, both of Decatur; two children; and two
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Saturday at St. Luke’s
Episcopal Church in Cypress Mill, Texas.
Preferred memorials are to the ALS Association,
8600 Wurzbach Rd, No. 700, San Antonio TX,
78240.
Email condolences may be sent to abond311@
gmail.com.
7-30#7#1
by
Dr. Steven A.
DeGroff
Doctor of Optometry
Presented as a service to the community by:
Dr. Steven A. DeGroff, O.D.
FAMILY £Y£ LAk£
150 Forest Park Dr. • Berne, IN 46711
(260) 589-3197
FAMILY £Y£ LAk£
00£5II0N5I
LALL ßk. ߣ0k0FF
AI |I60} 589-3197
Single-Lens
Distance Glasses
Reduce Falls In
Active Older People
Presbyopia (a progressively
diminished ability to focus
on near objects) is the most
common form of impaired
vision in older people. To
correct for this condition,
people are either prescribed
separate single-lens glasses
for distant and near vision
or, for convenience, a single
pair of multifocal (bifocal,
trifocal, or progressive lens)
glasses.
Multifocal glasses have
benefits for tasks that require
changes in focal length, such
as shopping and cooking.
But they also can impair
balance and increase the
risk of falls in older people.
Providing single-lens dis-
tance glasses to older people
who wear multifocal glasses
and who regularly take part
in outdoor activities is a
simple and effective way of
preventing falls. A recent
study shows that doing so
decreased falls significantly-
by about 40%.
Based on these findings, it
is recommended that older
people who take part in regu-
lar outdoor activities should
be provided with single-lens
distance glasses for outside
use. However, those who un-
dertake little outdoor activity
should use multifocal glasses
for more activities, rather
than using multiple pairs of
glasses.
Visit our WEB SITE at: www.drdegroff.com
or e-mail: c2020@drdegroff.com
5640 E. 1000 N.
Decatur, Indiana
Open House:
July 25, 5-6:30pm
Owner:
Mark and Sandra
Freudenberg
Call Jim at
Litlejohn
Auctons for
more
informaton:
Nearly 2 Acres
3 Car Garage
Several Outbuildings
New Roof in 2010
Plenty of room for
Outdoor Fun and
Gardening
Tom Bauermeister, Auctoneer ~AC#31200004
By TOM LoBIANCO
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— Dozens of Purdue
University professors
questioned their new
school president’s com-
mitment to academic
freedom Monday follow-
ing the release of emails
showing that as governor
Mitch Daniels tried to
keep a liberal historian’s
textbook out of Indiana
classrooms.
Ninety professors
signed the open letter
to Daniels, saying they
were more troubled by
his continued criticism of
Howard Zinn’s writings
since becoming Purdue’s
president than they were
by the emails he sent
as governor more than
three years ago.
‘‘However much we
disagree with your past
statements, we are more
troubled by the fact that
you continue to express
these views today, espe-
cially since you are now
speaking as the chief
representative of Purdue
University with the
responsibility to embody
the best of academic
inquiry and exchange,’’
the professors wrote.
Daniels’ efforts to keep
Zinn’s ‘‘A People’s History
of the United States’’ out
of the hands of K-12
students and educators
has created a firestorm
in academic circles since
The Associated Press last
week published emails in
which he urged advisers
to ‘‘disqualify the pro-
paganda’’ from teacher
training courses. He also
called Zinn’s book ‘‘a truly
execrable, anti-factual
piece of disinformation
that misstates American
history on every page.’’
In his letter, Daniels
said, ‘‘I have never made
any suggestion that any
university cease teach-
ing whatever its faculty
pleases, or cease using
any book.’’ The emails,
however, show that after
Daniels was told Zinn’s
book was being used at
Indiana University in
a professional develop-
ment course for exist-
ing teachers, he replied,
‘‘This crap should not be
accepted for any credit
by the state’’ and he then
signed off on a sugges-
tion that officials review
such courses across the
state.
A Republican fund-
raiser and state Board
of Education member
then suggested a review
of all teacher preparation
programs at Indiana’s
universities, and Daniels
quickly signed off on it.
‘‘Go for it,’’ Daniels
wrote. ‘‘Disqualify propa-
ganda and highlight (if
there is any) the more
useful offerings. Don’t
the ed schools have at
least some substantive
PD (professional devel-
opment) courseware to
upgrade knowledge of
math, science, etc.’’
He has continued to
defend his emails, issu-
ing a statement last week
reiterating his argument
that Zinn’s work dis-
torts history and quoting
numerous scholars who
also have spoken against
it.
The 90 professors rep-
resent only about 5 per-
cent of Purdue’s nearly
1,800 faculty members,
but the letter was only
circulated among liberal
arts colleges. Purdue’s
Board of Trustees, most
of whose members were
appointed by Daniels
while he was governor,
reaffirmed its support
for him last week. The
University Senate has
not taken a position on
the Zinn issue.
The former Indiana
governor responded to
their concerns Monday
with many of the same
arguments he made last
week, saying his objec-
tions only dealt with
K-12 schools.
‘‘Protecting the edu-
cational standards of
middle schoolers, to me
an important duty of
any governor, has noth-
ing to do with protecting
against encroachments
of academic freedom in
higher education, a simi-
larly central duty of any
university president. I
have and will attend to
the latter duty with the
same resoluteness I tried
to bring to the former,’’
Daniels wrote.
He also added a
new charge, that Zinn
undercut the founda-
tion of scientific inquiry
and research in an arti-
cle titled ‘‘The Uses of
Scholarship.’’
Daniels has come
under fire at Purdue
before. Some faculty
expressed skepticism last
year that a non-academic
would be an ardent sup-
porter of higher educa-
tion.
2 Drivers Ticketed
Two citations were
handed out earlier this
week by the Decatur
Police Department.
Cited for speeding, 59
mph in a 45 mph zone on
County Road 650 N, was
Amy Premer, Bluffton.
Cited on Adams Street
for illegal consumption
of an alcoholic beverage
was Leah N. Brewer, 19,
of Decatur.
Cited Sunday by
Adams County Sheriff’s
Department deputies
for speed, 70 mph in a
55 mph zone on U.S.
27, was Isabel Franco,
Decatur.
Jailed Here
A Portland man was
jailed Sunday following
his arrest by Berne police
officers.
William D. McAbee,
42, is being held in
the Adams County jail
without bond following
his arrest at 3:07 a.m.
Sunday on a charge of
invasion of privacy.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
U.S. sales of previously
occupied homes slipped
in June to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of
5.08 million but remain
near a 3 1/2-year high.
The Nati onal
Association of Realtors
said Monday that sales
fell 1.2 percent last
month from an annual
rate of 5.14 million in
May. The NAR revised
down May’s sales, but
they were still the highest
since November 2009.
Despite last month’s
dip, home sales have
surged 15.2 percent from
a year ago. Sales have
recovered since early last
year, buoyed by job gains
and low mortgage rates.
Still, mortgage rates
have surged in recent
weeks over concern that
the Federal Reserve
could slow its bond-buy-
ing programs later this
year. The Fed’s bond
purchases have helped
keep long-term mortgage
and other rates low.
Higher mortgage
rates slowed sales last
month of higher-priced
homes in states such as
California and New York,
the Realtors group said.
The average rate on a
30-year fixed mortgage
leapt to 4.46 percent by
the end of June from
3.81 percent at the end
of May. The rate was 4.37
percent last week.
That rate increase
could hamper sales in
coming months, econo-
mists said. But most
expect housing to con-
tinue to recover, though
at a slower pace.
By LAURAN
NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON (AP)
— The first time Miriam
Lipton had breast cancer,
her thick locks fell out
two weeks after starting
chemotherapy. The sec-
ond time breast cancer
struck, Lipton gave her
scalp a deep chill and
kept much of her hair —
making her fight for sur-
vival seem a bit easier.
Hair loss is one of
chemotherapy’s most
despised side effects, not
because of vanity but
because it fuels stigma,
revealing to the world an
illness that many would
rather keep private.
‘‘I didn’t necessarily
want to walk around the
grocery store answering
questions about my can-
cer,’’ recalled Lipton, 45,
of San Francisco. ‘
‘If you look OK on the
outside, it can help you
feel, ‘OK, this is manage-
able, I can get through
this.’’’
Now U.S. researchers
are about to put an exper-
imental hair-preserving
treatment to a rigorous
test: To see if strapping
on a cap so cold it numbs
the scalp during chemo,
like Lipton did, really
works well enough to be
used widely in this coun-
try, as it is in Europe and
Canada.
Near-freezing temper-
atures are supposed to
reduce blood flow in the
scalp, making it harder
for cancer-fighting drugs
to reach and harm hair
follicles. But while sev-
eral types of cold caps
are sold around the
world, the Food and Drug
Administration hasn’t
approved their use in the
U.S.
Scalp cooling is an
idea that’s been around
for decades, but it never
caught on here in part
because of a concern:
Could the cold prevent
chemotherapy from
reaching any stray can-
cer cells lurking in the
scalp?
‘‘Do they work and
are they safe? Those are
the two big holes. We
just don’t know,’’ said
American Cancer Society
spokeswoman Kimberly
Stump-Sutliff, an oncol-
ogy nurse who said stud-
ies abroad haven’t settled
those questions.
Cold caps tested
to prevent hair
loss during chemo
‘‘We need to know.’’
To Dr. Hope Rugo of the
University of California,
San Francisco, the impact
of hair loss has been over-
looked, even belittled, by
health providers.
She’s had patients
delay crucial treatment
to avoid it, and others
whose businesses suf-
fered when clients saw
they were sick and shied
away.
With more people sur-
viving cancer, ‘‘we need to
make this experience as
tolerable as possible, so
there’s the least baggage
at the end,’’ Rugo said.
‘‘Quite frankly, it’s
the first or second ques-
tion out of most patients’
mouths when I tell them
I recommend chemother-
apy. It’s not, ‘Is this going
to cure me? It’s, ‘Am I
going to lose my hair?’’’
adds Dr. Susan Melin of
North Carolina’s Wake
Forest Baptist Medical
Center.
Profs at Purdue
blast Daniels on
academic freedom
Open letter signed by 90
Ultralight in
fatal crash
LAPORTE, Ind. (AP)
— An ultralight aircraft
crash in northern Indiana
has killed a 36-year-old
man.
WSBT-TV and WNDU-
TV report the crash
Sunday morning in a
LaPorte County corn field
killed Benjamin Hubbard
of South Bend.
The LaPorte County
Sheriff’s Department says
Hubbard had arranged
to meet a pilot friend
in Plymouth, and when
Hubbard didn’t show up,
the other pilot went over
the ultralight’s flight path
and found the wreckage.
The cause of the crash
was not immediately
clear. The investigation
(Continued from page 1A)
County boards of park and recreation have always
managed to have a successful relationship, but it
will be very difficult to maintain if all this bickering
is allowed to continue,” Hebble said.
The county park board president said her board
plans to rescind an agreement reached earlier this
year that allowed Craig Krull to assist county mainte-
nance supervisor Dave Meyer on a part-time basis, if
that assistance did not interfere with Krull’s regular
park duties.
Hebble, citing what she termed a “personality con-
flict” between Meyer and Krull, on Monday said the
board at its next meeting will terminate that agree-
ment “and Craig will resume his fulltime duties as a
parks and recreation employee. And I don’t want any
more harassment from anybody.”
Commission Chairman Doug Bauman got to the
heart of the disagreement when he asked Hebble who
would supervise and evaluate Krull. Hebble said Sue
Milholland, a city of Decatur parks employee, has
handled that position in the past, although Ripley
said it was anticipated that Decatur Operations
Director Jeremy Gilbert would supervise Krull in the
future.
Bauman said the commissioners “have had some
reservations about what Craig was doing during his
40-hour week, especially during the winter.
Added fellow commissioner Ed Coil, “Sometimes
you see people sitting around not doing anything,
and you wonder why. We pay Craig’s salary, his med-
ical insurance, and we’re just trying to find things for
him to do.”
“Some people think we’re after Craig’s job, but the
truth is we’re trying to save his job,” Bauman said,
“rather than to outsource mowing and snow removal
duties.”
Also in attendance at Monday’s meeting was Larry
Isch, president of the Decatur Parks Board. Isch said
Decatur City Attorney Tim Baker is in the process
of drawing up an agreement that will better outline
County-park board dispute escalates
the structure of the city-county parks and rec rela-
tionship, “with Jeremy Gilbert at the top of the flow
chart.”
Isch said the agreement will be presented to the
city park board at its next meeting and, if approved,
will then be forwarded on to the county board.
Bauman thanked the county park board rep-
resentatives for their attention to the matter. “We
appreciate the fact that you folks are working on
this. Whatever you decide, we want cooperation, but
we also want to make sure there is accountability for
our employees.”
Home sales dip,
but still near high
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 4A • Tuesday, July 23, 2013 OpiniOn
The DecaTur Daily DemocraT
Ron Storey, Publisher
Bob Shraluka
Managing Editor
J Swygart
Opinion Page Editor
Indiana GOP joins
Washington in
crony capitalism
By Tad deHaven
The Indianapolis Star’s investigation of a contrac-
tor hired by the Indiana Economic Development
Corporation (IEDC) to select companies to receive
taxpayer handouts is further evidence that a separa-
tion of state government and commercial interests
is needed. For that to happen, however, Indiana will
need to separate itself from the federal money that
perpetuates “crony capitalism.”
The unfolding story of an Indiana company,
Elevate Ventures, appears to be a prime example.
Founded in late 2010 by Howard Bates, “a well-
connected businessman and Republican campaign
donor,” Elevate was soon awarded a $1.5-million-
per-year contract by Republican Gov. Mitch Daniels’
administration to identify businesses that should
receive taxpayer subsidies. According to the Star,
Elevate proceeded to give almost $500,000 to a
company run by Bates and another $300,000 to a
company run by Bates’ son.
The money, however, came from the federal gov-
ernment; specifically, a $1.5-billion federal business-
subsidy program created by the Small Business Jobs
Act of 2010. Essentially another attempt to stimulate
the economy, the legislation was created and passed
by a Democratic Congress and signed into law by a
Democratic president.
At first blush, it would seem ironic that partisan
Democratic legislation at the federal level would lead
to partisan Republican uses at the state level. There
is no irony, however, as this sort of arrangement is
standard fare. For all of the partisan bluster one reads
or hears in the media, the truth is that politicians in
both parties — and both levels of government — are
partners in the corporate welfare racket.
Remember Solyndra? Republicans held up the
now-defunct solar energy company as the prime
example of the failure of crony capitalism under the
Obama administration’s stimulus efforts. But while
they were busy making political hay out of Solyndra,
many congressional Republicans were busy petition-
ing the federal Department of Energy behind the
scene to deliver similar subsidies to companies back
in their districts.
One of those members of Congress was the cur-
rent governor of Indiana, Mike Pence. Indeed, then-
Rep. Pence, a vocal critic of the Obama administra-
tion’s economic policies, was one of four Indiana
Republican signatories to a letter asking the Energy
Department to subsidize a manufacturing facility
in Tipton for a company called Abound Solar. The
company was awarded a $400 million federal loan
guarantee, but ended up filing for a bankruptcy a
year after Solyndra went bust.
Federal politicians weren’t the only the ones sali-
vating over an opportunity to take credit for the jobs
Abound Solar was supposed to create. On July 3,
2010, the IEDC issued a press release celebrating
Abound Solar’s decision to build the Tipton plant
and noted that the state offered the company “up to
$11.85 million in performance-based tax credits and
$250,000 in training grants.”
“What a great way to celebrate Independence Day,”
said then-Gov. Mitch Daniels. The celebration was
short-lived.
The Star’s recent expose on the Carbon Motors
debacle is another example of the problem with state
officials looking to hitch a ride on the federal gravy
train. To great fanfare, the Daniels administration
threw millions of dollars at the company and its plan
to manufacture high-tech police cars in Connersville.
The Department of Energy, however, perhaps chas-
tened following Solyndra and other subsidized fail-
ures, eventually decided against guaranteeing a $310
million loan to Carbon. The company soon went
under. A bitter Daniels blamed the federal govern-
ment. Such, however, can be the price for relying on
handouts from Uncle Sam.
Politicians do not possess special knowledge that
enables them to allocate capital more efficiently than
markets. They are no more clairvoyant about market
trends and scientific breakthroughs than anyone
else. Thus, when the government starts choosing
industries and technologies to subsidize, it often
makes bad decisions at taxpayer expense.
Businesses and venture-capital firms make many
mistakes as well, but their losses are private and not
foisted involuntarily on taxpayers. And even where a
government can point to “successes,” it’s critical to
remember that when politicians favor one company
they do so at the expense of other taxpaying busi-
nesses and individuals.
Tad DeHaven is a budget analyst at the Cato
Institute and co-editor of www.downsizinggovern-
ment.org. Previously he was a deputy director of the
Indiana Office of Management and Budget under Gov.
Mitch Daniels.
Back to the basics
By KaTHRYn Jean LOPeZ
I confess I’ve been doing some yelling
at the TV. I keep hearing that we have
to have a “national conversation on vio-
lence” in the wake of the verdict in the
George Zimmerman trial. We’re having
no such conversation, at least one that
means anything, until we confront who
we are as a nation today.
Earlier this summer in Florida, vio-
lence of a different sort was the topic,
as legislation to protect children born
alive during the course of a late-term
abortion was debated. A similar debate
was recently held, among much public
comment, over a bill that would protect
fetuses 20 weeks or older. It’s barbaric
that we’d consider this a mere matter
of family planning, as a former Speaker
of the House seemed to say in a recent
interview. But that’s what happens after
40 years of legal abortion and the euphe-
misms that come with it.
Whether our media focus is on
Zimmerman or Planned Parenthood,
the furor that’s made manifest in pro-
tests and controversy is an avoidance
of addressing fundamental questions of
purpose and identity.
We see this, too, in the immigra-
tion debate. While much of the media
coverage seems to be whether Florida
Sen. Marco Rubio hurt or helped his
presidential chances by pushing a bill
through the Senate that may die in the
House, the debate skirts the issues that
we need to be confronting.
In a new book, “Immigration and the
Next America,” Los Angeles Archbishop
Jose Gomez tries to further the assess-
ment of the national conscience. On
immigration, he says, “We can’t truly
resolve the political issues of immigra-
tion unless we have some common
agreement or shared understanding
about our country’s identity and pur-
pose.”
Politics, he adds, “is a conversation
about how we ought to order our lives
together.” At least, that’s what politics
should be. But in order to have that
conversation, we need to agree on basic
terms. In order to know what we ought
to do, we need to have some shared
understanding of our past and the his-
torical project of this great nation.
Gomez points to our lack of “moral
consensus.” There used to be one:
“America was ‘one nation under God,’
with an exceptional identity and respon-
sibility among the family of nations. For
most of our history, we were confident
that American institutions should shape
moral character and instill the civic vir-
tues required for our democracy to func-
tion. Virtues such as religion and family;
individual freedom and responsibility;
the work ethic; the rule of law; equality
of opportunity; honesty, fair play, and
the common good; the sense of politics
as public service.”
There’s plenty of rhetoric about fair-
ness, tolerance, equality, transparency,
and the common good, of course, but
most of it tends to be at the service of
ideological campaigns, often in contrast
with those institutions we’ve relied on.
In this reality, it’s largely impossible to
have a productive conversation, period.
In reintroducing America to Americans,
Gomez proposes looking not just at the
Constitution and the Founding Fathers,
who “understood that our democracy’s
strength depends on our citizens’ free-
dom to live according to their faith,”
but “the rest of the story of America’s
founding.” It’s a story of “Christian
mission” in the late 15th and 16th cen-
turies, at “the heart and soul of the Age
of Discovery.” In documenting “atroci-
ties of conquerors in recent years,” for
which we “should feel remorse,” Gomez
writes, we’ve “lost a crucial thread to
our national story,” that “the deepest
motivations for America’s founding were
religious and spiritual.” Only in remem-
bering this, in understanding what
undergirds America’s exceptionalism,
can we make any progress. Our calls for
conversations are pointless until pulver-
izing the opposition stops being the No.
1 priority. And there’s no reform without
self-knowledge.
Kathryn Lopez is the editor-at-large of
National Review Online.
Write a letter
Letters to the editor
must be submitted with
the author’s signature,
address and telephone
number. Send letters to
141 S. Second St., PO
Box 1001, Decatur
IN 46733, or by email
to: j@decaturdailydem-
ocrat.com
DECATUR DAILY DEMOCRAT
VOL. CXI, NO. 174, Tues., July 23, 2013
The Decatur Daily Democrat (USPS 150-780) is pub-
lished daily except Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day
and Christmas Day by: HORIZON PUBLISHING CO. OF
INDIANA, 141. S. Second St., Decatur, IN 46733.
Periodicals postage paid at Decatur, IN. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to the Decatur Daily
Democrat,141 S. 2nd St., Decatur, IN 46733.
By TOM LoBIanCO
associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — It’s ironic
that a debate over the complete
and accurate telling of history,
and whether Howard Zinn fits in
that picture, is what is ultimately
bringing out a more complete pic-
ture of Purdue University President
Mitch Daniels, who sought to keep
the liberal historian’s work out
of Indiana K-12 classrooms while
governor.
In a series of emails sent on
Feb. 9, 2010, the former gover-
nor advised his education team
to ‘‘disqualify the propaganda,’’
like Zinn’s ‘‘A People’s History of
the United States,’’ from credit for
teacher training on the premise it
is ‘‘execrable and anti-factual.’’
In the days since the emails were
first printed by The Associated
Press, academics nationwide have
condemned Daniels’ move. He con-
tests he never tried to stifle aca-
demic freedom and simply wanted
to keep the textbook out of the
hands of K-12 students.
But much like Zinn’s book was
used to present another side of his-
tory, internal notes Daniels sent to
his education team between 2009
and 2012 show another side of
the man presented on the national
stage as one of the Republican
Party’s most reasonable offerings.
Publicly, Daniels had backed
away from much of the rhetoric
that had marked his early days
as governor, when he charged
that Democratic lawmakers ‘‘car-
bombed’’ his first legislative agen-
da. But from the start of his second
term, he played a sharp-elbowed
role behind the scenes, ensuring
his agenda was enacted. In an April
10, 2009, email, he requested an
audit of Indiana University-Purdue
University Indianapolis professor
Charles Little, a sharp critic of his
education plans. And when his
staunchest opponent, the Indiana
State Teachers Association, upped
the amount it collected from mem-
bers, Daniels saw an opening.
‘‘Time to challenge them pub-
licly on this?’’ Daniels wrote in a
July 14, 2009, email.
When the Indiana Professional
Standards Board, which used to set
teacher licensing rules, demurred
on his overhaul of teacher prepa-
ration, Daniels asked in a July 29,
2009, email, ‘‘What has happened
about getting the members of these
boards in for a thank-you and a
spine-stiffening session?’’
Shortly before he pushed the
nation’s broadest use of school
vouchers, changes in teacher prep-
aration, new teacher evaluations
and raft of other ambitious edu-
cation changes in 2011, Daniels
and his team quietly lined up the
votes in the General Assembly.
Then-schools Superintendent Tony
Bennett’s then-chief of staff, Todd
Huston, delivered a spreadsheet
identifying where Republican leg-
islators stood on his plan in an
Oct. 14, 2010, email to Daniels,
Bennett and Republican mega-
donor Al Hubbard. Daniels advised
Huston should be careful
‘‘Tks. Will treat in total confi-
dence. If it has headings, I’d delete
them if I were you. We shd have for
other key reform issues, too???’’
Daniels wrote.
The emails are a constant
reminder that the man who pre-
sented himself as a master tech-
nocrat, more concerned with fiscal
issues than social grenades, came
up in Washington as an ace politi-
cal operative.
Most notes are not as visceral
as the Zinn exchange, and many
reflect an incredible eye for politi-
cal strategy that would be expected
of Ronald Reagan’s former political
director. In an August 12, 2009,
Huston suggested that Indianapolis
radio host and African-American
leader Amos Brown should be
placed on the roundtable discuss-
ing the governor’s education agen-
da because, among other things, it
could keep a ‘‘loud mouth’’ oppo-
nent in check.
Shortly afterward, Brown
received a phone call from Bennett,
asking him to join the board, and
he accepted.
Brown said the move didn’t
tempter his critiques and laughed
as he read the email exchange,
saying he took ‘‘no umbrage’’ at the
play.
‘‘Governor Daniels and I always
had a healthy respect for each
other. We’ve always been frank
with each other,’’ he said.
Former House Education
Chairman Charlie Brown, D-Gary,
wasn’t so charitable and called for
Daniels resignation last week after
reading the emails.
‘‘He was the Ronald Reagan of
Indiana, nothing stuck to him,’’
Brown said.
The emails show only a slice of
how Daniels worked behind the
scenes. Bennett and his staff delet-
ed many records when they left
office.
The point Zinn tried to make
through an admittedly one-sid-
ed career was that the view of
history in America’s then-white-
washed textbooks was incomplete.
It wouldn’t be right, he argued, to
talk about the Boston Massacre
without mentioning the massacre
of Pequot Indians in the 1630s in
Massachusetts or any of the many
other wars between colonists and
Native Americans.
Likewise, Daniels’ public com-
ments present an incomplete
picture of a seminal figure in
Republican politics, Indiana and,
now, higher education. Talk of
removing ‘‘execrable’’ texts from
classrooms is not all Daniels ever
said about education, but it is now
a part of his broader discussion of
a ‘‘broken’’ education system.
Emails give glimpse behind Daniels’ curtain
Canada tragedy
fuels debate on
rail-pipeline
The tragic loss of
at least 13 lives in the
Canadian border town
of Lac-Megantic to a
fireball of burning crude
oil is sure to ramp up
debate about how petro-
leum products should
be moved across North
America.
One sure talking
point is that oil is moved
more safely by pipeline
than rail — a linchpin
for proponents of the
Keystone XL pipeline.
But Saturday’s accident
of a 72-car runaway fuel
train should renew focus
on just how safe those
long black snakes of oil
tankers are in a crash.
Depending on the
government stats used,
pipelines have been
safer in terms of injuries
and deaths and total
spills than rail or truck
when transporting oil
and other fuel prod-
ucts. But pipeline spills
resulted in average
releases of more than
19,000 gallons per inci-
dent between 2005 and
2009. Tank cars aver-
aged just under 1,700.
What is clear is that
crude oil isn’t going to
stop riding the rails
to refineries. Although
pipelines still move the
bulk of crude oil, trains
are carrying 10 times
more than they were
just five years ago.
Some analysts
speculate that even
if Keystone is never
approved, rail eventually
will be able to carry all
the shale and tar sands
crude the region can
produce.
Evansville Courier
& Press
Decatur Daily Democrat
Tuesday, July 23, 2013 • Page 5A
Community
It’s Simple...
Just submit a receipt from a
participating restaurant on our
Want to Win a FREE $15 Gift
Certificate To A Restaurant?
Restaurant & Bar Guide
that runs once a month.
Send receipt to:
141 S. Second St.
Decatur, IN 46733
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
Please include Name, Address & Phone Number.
(Only Name and City will be published)
Premium Hardwood
Organic Mulch
Graber Lumber
Pallets Timber Mulch Hardwood
2828 W 500 S • Berne, IN
260 385 8925
Colored Enhanced
Mulch
by Graber Lumber
There is a Difference!
BUY DIRECT
• Home Owners
• Contractors
• Businesses
• Industries
New & Improved
Textured Mulch
Hours:
Mon - Sat 7-7
622 N. 13th St. • US 27 North • Decatur
724-8181
Celebrating
35 Years
Delicious Salmon Steak or Ham Steak
Served with Green beans, potato, cole slaw, roll & butter
Sorry, No Substitutes!
2 Dinners
$
9
95
for
only
ALL DAY July 24 & 25 - Dine in Only!
Give Galley GIFT CERTIFICATES!
ALL DAY
Wed. & Thurs.
www.thegalleydecatur.com -The Galley
Sense & Sensitivity
by Harriette Cole
Punk Student Struggles To Fit In
DEAR HARRIETTE: I am
a high school sophomore,
and I am finding it hard to
deal with being at school.
I would consider myself a
more unique person than
the people at my school.
Everyone at my school looks,
dresses and acts the same.
I am the only kid who has
a giant mohawk. I am into
punk rock and would say I
do my own thing instead of
conforming to mainstream
America. However, every-
one at school has been
bullying me, especially the
jocks. It didn’t bother me
before, but now I hate going
to school. What should I do
to deal with this problem? --
Different, Des Moines, Iowa
DEAR DIFFERENT:
There is a pretty good
chance that there are other
students at your school
who are also different. They
may not share your particu-
lar interests, but if you look
around, you will likely notice
that there are other students
who do not quite fit into the
mainstream. Seek them out
and see if there is any syn-
ergy between you. You may
find commonality in the very
desire to walk to your own
drum.
As far as the jocks and
others who have been bul-
lying you, since you are now
feeling the emotional burden
of their agitation, tell your
teacher, principal and guid-
ance counselor. Be proac-
tive about standing up for
yourself. It may seem terrifi-
cally difficult right now, but it
can be easier to navigate
such a tough situation if you
have support.
It is also important to rec-
ognize that you have cho-
sen to represent yourself in
a way that is very different
from the majority of your fel-
low students. Naturally, they
would notice that. Rather
than you being consumed
by their reaction, seek out
other students and/or activi-
ties that support your inter-
ests. If you have a creative,
healthy outlet that allows
you to be yourself, it may be
easier for you to deflect the
blows of others who do not
understand you. Look for a
punk rock club in your area.
Do not give up until you find
a place where you feel at
ease. This may help dim the
bullying.
DEAR HARRIETTE:
My 10-year-old daugh-
ter is a well-groomed girl.
She bathes every day and
wears clean clothes. I know,
because I wash them. So I
do not understand how such
a young girl can have body
odor. I recently noticed that
she has serious underarm
odor. I am beside myself. I
know that she washes her
body every day. I do not real-
ly want to get her deodorant
already. What should I do?
-- Smelly, Washington, D.C.
DEAR SMELLY: I have
spoken to several pediatri-
cians about this issue and
have learned that it is com-
mon these days for children
as young as 9 to start puber-
ty. Body odor is one of the
signs of a developing body.
Others include the growth of
pubic hair and the budding
of body parts.
Take your daughter to her
pediatrician and get a physi-
cal. Tell the doctor about her
body’s changes and ask for
guidance as to how to take
care of her. As it relates to
body odor, there are natural
deodorants (not antiperspi-
rants) that may help.
Community Calendar
TUESDAY, July 23:
Senior citizens play cards, 1 p.m., Riverside Center.
Operation Help food pantry for Decatur and
Monroe residents, 1-3 p.m., Adams County Service
Complex.
St. Mark’s United Methodist Church Food Pantry,
5-6 p.m. Families can receive food once monthly.
A.A., 7 p.m., First United Methodist Church.
WEDNESDAY, July 24:
Immanuel House, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 8545 N 500 E,
Decatur.
Free meal, 5-6 p.m., First United Methodist
Church, 6th St. entrance.
Celebrate Recovery, 6-7 p.m., small groups, 7-8
p.m., The Bridge Community Church.
Adult Children of Alcoholics, a 12-step support
program for those raised in alcoholic families, 7 p.m.,
The Bridge Community Church, 403 Winchester Rd.
THURSDAY, July 25:
Optimist Club, 7 a.m., Adams Memorial Hospital,
Decatur Room.
Senior Citizens play cards, 1 p.m., Riverside
Center.
TOPS Club weigh-in, 5:30 p.m.; meeting 6:15
p.m., Woodcrest Activity Building.
Weight Watchers, 6 p.m., weigh-in; 6:30 p.m.
meeting, Adams Memorial Hospital Decatur Room.
Sober Beginnings, 6:30-8 p.m., Adams Memorial
Hospital Berne Room.
Divorce Care 4 Kids, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Decatur
Church of God.
A.A. (open) Big Book meeting, 7 p.m., First Church
of the Nazarene, Berne.
Razz m’ Jazz set
to perform at 4-H fair
Razz m’ Jazz Dance
Studio will perform rou-
tines from their June
recital Dance Your Heart
Out at the Adams County
4-H Fair Stage in Monroe
on Wednesday, July 24
at 7 p.m., and at Berne
Swiss Days on Friday,
July 26 at 5 p.m.
Dances will be per-
formed in clogging, jazz,
tap, lyrical, hip-hop, and
ballet.
An open house/ fall
registration will be held
Saturday, August 3 from
10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the
studio, 1580 Morningstar
Blvd in Decatur, with
no registration fee
required.
For more information
724-3116.
DANCING DOLLS .. These dancing dolls will be per-
forming at the Adams County 4-H Fair Wednesday.
Pictured are, front: Macie Morehouse; kneeling is
Olivia Rhoades and Nicole Busse; and standing are
Avery Ball, Taylor Knaub, Anvalie Liechty, Maddie
Blythe, and Ellie Rose Johnson. (Photo provided)
St. Mark’s Car Show
is declared a success
St. Mark’s United
Methodist Church held
their 2nd Annual Sweet
Chariot Car Show recent-
ly, and with 76 registered
vehicles – more than dou-
ble last year’s amount
– the event was declared
a great success.
Several special-
ty awards were given
including:
• Cool Chariot went
to Brice and Melissa
Lawrence of Ossian
for their 2011 Dodge
Challenger.
• Missionary’s Choice
to Ted Cook of Roanoke,
Ind., for his 1969 Pontiac
Firebird.
• The Committee’s
Choice was given to Gary
and Joyce Barnett of Gas
City, Ind., for their 1929
Ford Model A.
•YouthAwardwentto
Roger DeRoo of Monroe
for his 1953 Ford F-100
Pickup.
We want to thank all
that attended and partic-
ipated, and a big special
thanks to all the spon-
sors that made the event
successful.
A part of the car show
was a Pine Car Derby
Race supported by
Whistle Stop Hobbies &
Crafts, using Boy Scouts
regulation and Outlaw
classification; anything
goes. There were 11 par-
ticipants in the Boy Scout
regulations, and 5 par-
ticipants in the Outlaw.
Winners of the 5-ounce
or lighter were: In first
place was A.J. Kable;
in second was Kaden
McDonald and third place
went to Tristan Price.
Winners in the Outlaw
race, over 5-ounces or
heavier, were: In first
place was Cooper Teeple;
second place went to
Hayden Huss; and in
third place was Drew
Soughan.
AND THE WINNERS ARE ... Pictured above are the
winners of the 5-ounce or lighter class, from left:
in first place was A.J. Kable; in second was Kaden
McDonald and third place went to Tristan Price.
Below are the winners in the 5-ounce or heavier
class, from left: in first place was Cooper Teeple;
second place went to Hayden Huss; and in third
place was Drew Soughan. (Photo provided)
First Presbyterian has
pre-k, daycare openings
First Presbyterian Church Daycare children have
been having a great summer. They have gone bowling,
visited Science Central in Fort Wayne, and have made
several trips to the Adams Public Library and city
pool.
The children have enjoyed a few “water days” as
well, with the last one including shaving cream, a
hose, tubs of water and a sprinkler.
Preschool and daycare spots are still available. For
more information contact Marge Harvey at 724-6953.
SUMMER FUN ... Children at the First Presbyterian
Church Daycare enjoyed a “water day” to help
beat the summer heat. Pictured from left are Torie
Liechty, Kylie Tinnel, Cobynn Omler, and Melia
Fosnaugh. (Photo provided)
dSt preSentS CertifiCate of
appreCiation to loCal buSineSS
The Decatur
Sculpture Tour (DST)
Committee recently
presented a certificate
of appreciation to the
law offices of DeVoss,
Johnson, Zwick, Baker,
& Ainsworth for their
financial support of the
DST. The company’s
named plaque appears
on exhibit piece “Red
Tail” by Judd Nelson of
Minneapolis. Minn.
At the conclusion of
the exhibit, this piece
may be leased, at a
negotiable price, or pur-
chased for $5,000. All
exhibits will be on dis-
play until May 2014.
The new DST bro-
chures featuring the
23 new exhibits on
the 2013 DST may
be obtained at DST
map boxes, Decatur
Chamber of Commerce,
Adams Public
Library,the Adams
County Community
Foundation, or any of
the DST sponsors. The
2103 DST posters are
also available for pur-
chase and are available
at the Java Bean or
Sunshine Uniques.
For more informa-
tion on the DST go to
www.decatursculpture-
tour.com.
BIG THANKS FROM DST ... Shown from left
are attorneys at law Tim Baker and Scott
Ainsworth, from the law firm of DeVoss,
Johnson, Zwick, Baker & Ainsworth holding
the certificate of appreciation presented to
them by the DST committee. . (Photo pro-
vided)
TREES PLEASE ... Tri Kappa Sorority and Tri Kappa
Associates recently donated $500 for trees to be
planted in the future Storybook Park. Pictured from
left are Kelly Ehinger, library director, Nicole Baker,
member of Tri Kappa and her children, Will, Isaac,
Grace, and Isla. (Photo provided)
Columbia U
announces
Dean’s list
Columbia College
Chicago announced
Megan Pavelka of Berne
was named to the Dean’s
list for the 2013 spring
semester. Pavelka is
majoring in dance.
To be named to the
Dean’s list students must
have taken at least 12
credit hours and have a
3.75 grade point average
or above on a 4.0 scale
for that semester.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Page 6A • Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Fair HigHligHts
Dr. Blake Taylor
RPh. DMD
Dr. Molly Meyer Sigler
DDS
Serving you in 2 Locations
234 N. 1st. St.
Decatur, IN
724-7032
1429 N. Baker Pl.
Bluffton, IN
824-4614
Accepting
New Patients
We Accept CARE CREDIT ®
www.taylordental.net
Proud To Support 4-H
“Now Accepting...Delta Dental Premiere”
5068 E. 100 N. Bluffton, IN
1-800-876-9351
260-565-3659
983 N. ST. RD 13 Wabash, IN
1-888-876-9353
260-563-1149
4777 W. 500 N. Huntington, IN
1-888-876-9352
260-356-7958
E-MAIL: troxel@troxelequipment.com
WEBSITE: www.troxelequipment.com
SOLID, STABLE &
STILL JOHN DEERE
WE SUPPORT
& SALUTE THE
4-H KIDS SUCCESS!!
T r o x e l L o g o B - W 1 3 0 4 Y S D
W e d n e s d a y , A p r i l 1 7 , 2 0 1 3 3 : 4 9 : 2 1 P M
NATIONAL OIL & GAS, Inc.
MARKETERS OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
Prompt Delivery To Your
Home, Farms & Businesses
Competitive Prices on All
Premium Diesel
Non-Ethanol Gasoline
Racing Gasoline
Bio Diesel
Pure 1-K Kerosene
Motor Oils
Heating Oil
Super Diesel Fuel
For All Your
Farm Needs Call Us!
DECATUR
Mike Cook ........... 849-0440
Ron Collins .......... 437-0811
BERNE
Mark Lehmann .... 525-8186
Ron Collins .......... 437-0811
BLUFFTON ..................... 824-2220
MONROEVILLE .............. 433-0870
For Grain & Fertilizer
Call Luanne, Nan & Amber
1257 State Route 33
Willshire, Ohio 45898
FARMERS GRAIN & AG LLC
419-495-2338
800-589-9360
HONEGGER, RINGGER & CO.
Certified Public Accountants
Business Services
Our Tax Professionals Serving Area Business
and Individual Needs Since 1969
1905 N Main St., Bluffton Ph: (260) 824-4107 Toll Free: (888) 853-5906
We Are Proud To
Support The 4-H Fair!
Ken Honegger, CPA Steve Ringger, CPA Mark Gerber, CPA Bruce Miller, CPA Trent Bucher, CPA
Brad Johnson, CPA Karla Lipscomb, CPA Elisa Brackmann Dean Topp, CPA Lisa Girod, CPA Mark Klopfenstein, CPA
www.hrc-cpa.com
Adams County 4-H
“Insurance For A Great Future”
Our company proudly
supports the Adams
County 4-H Fair.
Congratulations to all
the 4-H entrants in the
2013 4-H Fair. In
our eyes, you’re all
WINNERS!
(260) 724-7691 or (800) 247-8079
1733 Morningstar Blvd. • Decatur, IN 46733
• HOME • AUTO • FARM • BUSINESS
Adams County 4-H Fair is off and running
Lauren Ford (1) of Decatur tried to get a closer look at the cattle.
Paul Neuenschwander gives his lamb a trim in anticipa-
tion of judging this week at the Adams County 4-H fair.
Photos by
Jannaya
Andrews
Members of the 4-H Dog Club demonstrate the “halt” move with their canine companions during a
demonstration of skills on Sunday.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Tuesday, July 23, 2013 • Page 7A
Fair HigHligHts
Timber Ridge
Golf Course, Event Center & Catering
2330 E 250 N • Bluffton, IN 46714 • 260-824-2728
Coupon Must Be Present for Discount
Good For Up To 4 Players Expires 10-15-13
$29 All-Day Golf
Includes Cart and Weekends
Come Out And
Enjoy A Day of
Real Golf Fun!
www.thetimberridge.com
Schedule & Plan Your Special Event With Us!
Contact Denise @ The Banquet Hall 824-2728
Wedding Receptions •
Class Reunions •
Family Gatherings •
Holiday Parties •
Company Events •
Training Sessions •
EHFDXVHVRPHSHRSOHULVHEHIRUHWKHVXQ
:H¶OONHHS\RXUOLJKWVRQ
ELECTRICITY...
ADDING VALUE
TO YOUR LIFE
318 State St.
Willshire, OH 45898
419-495-2833 STORE
230-223-4647 CELL
whf318@myfrontiermail.com
FACEBOOOK
See Us At Our Booth
Row 3 Booth 3
At The 4-H Fairgrounds
Congratulations To All
The 4-H Kids!
Willshire Home Furnishings
Floorcovering & Home Decor
Bill & Aleta Weiss
Owners
OPEN HOUSE
Fall Registration
¸u:v:vuq · Zvq ' · 10uw-2¡w
@ Razz M’ Jazz
Standing Ovation Will Be On Site
For Fittings & Orders
No Registration Fee Required
Razz M’ Jazz
Dance Studio
2¬0-¨2!-'11¬
1·80 Sv:nInq.:u: 1ì:v. · Decatur, IN
}cqI.::u:Ivn. rIìì vc :u[cn v:c: :nc ¡nvnc v: vq
u¡¡vIn:wcn: unq:Iwc
}u:: · vu¡ · 1uììc: · 1q:Icuì · Cncc: 1uncc
vvwvìInq · 1:I.n · CìvqqInq · ·I¡ ·v¡
1uìì }vvw · 1:vvvc:Ivn · 1vIn:c · Svwwq c Sc
Sv.Icuì vncu::c · ·uruIIun . vunI:Iun
������������������������������
����������������������������������
���������������������������
������������������������������������
�������������������������������
�����!" �������������������#�����
������������������������" ������ ���
��������������"�������
$����"������������������%
&'()*�)
������������
������������
*+*��,%�**
��
�,�
-��������.�
�������������������������
����"��������/�����������������
������$������0���
������������������������������
�����������������������
Photos by
Jannaya
Andrews
Joey Kozlowski (3) of Decatur gives a big smile as he approaches a “cow” set up to dem-
onstrate what it feels like to milk a cow.
A crowd of people sit and enjoy dinner inside (top photo) and
out (above) from the Pork Producers of Adams County during
the 4-H Fair Sunday.
<
A young fair visitsor reaches in to
pet a goat as his father looks on.
Goats and lots of other animals have
moved into Monroe as the annual
Adams County 4-H Fair is under
way.
The Craft Building was a popular place Sunday as the crowd walked through to see what
projects the 4-H kids have created this year.
Pictured form left are Holly, Paul (14), and Ella Nuenschwander
(9), all of Berne
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 8A • Tuesday, July 23, 2013
News Briefs
Uoed Cnr
µONAN2A
2010 Dodge Ram 2500
Crew 4x4
Tonneau Cover, Full Power,
Hemi, Ready To Work
$20,995
Check Out Our Website
www.shifferlydodge.com
2010 Honda
Accord EX
34,000 miles, Alloy Wheels,
Sunroof, Loaded
$16,495
Check Out Our Website
www.shifferlydodge.com
Shifferly Dodge
704 N. 13th St.
Decatur, IN
260-724-4443
Shifferly Dodge
704 N. 13th St.
Decatur, IN
260-724-4443
2010 Chevy Equinox
LTZ
Leather, All Wheel Drive,
Back-Up Camera, Loaded,
47,000 miles
$19,995
Check Out Our Website
www.shifferlydodge.com
2012 Chyrsler
200 LX
Alloys, Sharp, 37,000 miles
$13,995
Check Out Our Website
www.shifferlydodge.com
Shifferly Dodge
704 N. 13th St.
Decatur, IN
260-724-4443
Shifferly Dodge
704 N. 13th St.
Decatur, IN
260-724-4443
Shifferly Dodge
704 N. 13th St.
Decatur, IN
260-724-4443
2008 Chevy Silverado
1500
Air, Auto Cruise, Tow Pkg.,
Bed Liner, Nice
$9,995
Check Out Our Website
www.shifferlydodge.com
Security frustrated, pope all smiles
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Pope Francis wants to
ignite the passion of Roman Catholics for their faith
while on his first international trip, and the boister-
ous, sometimes frenzied welcome he got on his first
day in Rio seemed to fill those hopes.
Returning to his home continent for the first time
since becoming pontiff, Francis smiled broadly as
thousands of people rushed his car Monday after
it became stuck behind buses and taxis when his
driver made a wrong turn on a main avenue in Rio’s
center.
It was a nightmarish scene for security officials,
but clearly a delight and another opportunity to con-
nect for this pope, who was scheduled to take a day
off Tuesday for rest and private meetings.
The ecstatic throngs forced his motorcade to
repeatedly come to a standstill, weeks after violent
protests against the government paralyzed parts of
Brazil. Francis’ driver turned into the wrong side of a
boulevard at one point, missing lanes that had been
cleared.
The pope rolled down his back-seat window,
waved to the crowd and touched those who reached
inside. He kissed a baby a woman handed to him.
Plane’s front landing gear collapses
NEW YORK (AP) — Officials were hoping to have
both runways at LaGuardia Airport up and fully
functional after the collapse of a plane’s front landing
gear sent it skidding along the tarmac and caused a
temporary suspension of operations.
The front landing gear of arriving Southwest
Airlines flight 345 collapsed Monday right after the
plane touched down on the runway, officials said.
Ten passengers were treated at the scene, with six
being taken to a hospital with minor injuries, said
Thomas Bosco, Acting Director of Aviation for the
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which
oversees the area airports. The six crew members
were taken to another hospital for observation.
Grants lead in paying college bills
WASHINGTON (AP) — Grants and scholarships
are taking a leading role in paying college bills, sur-
passing the traditional role parents long have played
in helping foot the bills, according to a report from
loan giant Sallie Mae
Since the recession, more college-bound stu-
dents have eliminated schools from their searches
based on costs and have relied less on their parents
once they get to campus, said the report released
Tuesday. Worries such as tuition increases and
job losses seem to have faded as the economy has
improved, yet parents and students still make deci-
sions on schools, majors and work schedules based
on the price tag.
‘‘We have moved into a post-recession reality in
how people pay for college,’’ said Sarah Ducich,
Sallie Mae’s senior vice president for public policy.
College spending per student was about $21,000
during 2012, down from a peak of $24,000 in 2010,
according to the Sallie Mae-Ipsos Public Affairs
report.
Military furloughs to continue
JOINT BASE CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — The audi-
ence gasped in surprise and gave a few low whistles
as Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel delivered the
news that furloughs, which have forced a 20 percent
pay cut on most of the military’s civilian workforce,
probably will continue next year, and it might get
worse.
‘‘Those are the facts of life,’’ Hagel told about 300
Defense Department employees, most of them mid-
dle-aged civilians, last week at an Air Force reception
hall on a military base in Charleston.
Future layoffs also are possible for the depart-
ment’s civilian workforce of more than 800,000
employees, Hagel said, if Congress fails to stem the
cuts in the next budget year, which starts Oct. 1.
On the heels of the department’s first furlough
day, and in three days of visits with members of
the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps, Hagel
played the unenviable role of messenger to a frus-
trated and fearful workforce coping with the inevita-
bility of a spending squeeze at the end of more than
a decade of constant and costly war.
12 arrests after oil pipeline protest
STOCKBRIDGE, Mich. (AP) — Authorities say
they’ve arrested 12 people protesting a Michigan oil
pipeline project.
The Lansing State Journal reports that the arrests
Monday came during a Michigan Coalition Against
Tar Sands protest in rural Ingham County.
Sheriff’s office personnel made eight initial arrests.
Authorities later arrested four others who had
attached themselves in groups of two to a pair of
bulldozers. Sheriff’s Lt. Vern Elliott says it took
authorities from the state police and Michigan State
University police around 90 minutes to detach the
four from the bulldozers.
The protesters want to halt Enbridge Inc.’s build-
ing of a new line. The Calgary, Alberta-based com-
pany’s pipeline ruptured in southwestern Michigan
in 2010, spilling about 800,000 gallons of oil into a
river. The line runs from Sarnia, Ontario, to Griffith,
Ind.
‘Dune boy’ moving about, eats regular
MICHIGAN CITY, Ind. (AP) — A 6-year-old boy who
survived being buried for three hours after a sand
dune collapsed is moving around the Chicago hos-
pital where he is recovering and could be released
soon, his doctor said Monday.
Nathan Woessner, who was in a coma after being
buried by a dune in Indiana, ‘‘is listed
as in good condition and continues to
improve,’’ Dr. Diana Mitchell said in a
statement released by Comer Children’s
Hospital.
She said the boy, who lives in
Sterling, Ill., returned to a regular diet
on Monday, ‘‘and can leave his room
to visit the playroom.’’ He is expected
to make a full neurological recovery but may suffer
lingering lung problems from inhaling sand, doctors
have said.
He was removed from a ventilator last week. When
the boy was intubated, two front teeth that had been
loose were knocked out, said his grandfather, Don
Reul. ‘‘We’re saving them for him, and they’re going
to put them under his pillow at some point,’’ Reul
told The LaPorte County Herald-Argus newspaper.
Nathan sustained scrapes on his face and a cut on
his head that required more than 20 staples, and his
each of his corneas was scratched from the sand, his
grandfather said.
Crews work to restore Michigan power
PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — A utility says crews from
three states are working to restore power after thun-
derstorms and high winds swept through southeast
Michigan.
Detroit-based DTE Energy Co. says about 7,500 of
its customers remain without power Monday after-
noon after storms starting Friday afternoon affected
about 145,000 homes and businesses. Crews from
Indiana and Ohio are helping Michigan workers on
restorations.
The storms knocked down hundreds of overhead
lines and trees.
Actor Dennis Farina dead at 69
NEW YORK (AP) — Dennis Farina, a onetime
Chicago cop who as a popular character actor played
a TV cop on ‘‘Law & Order’’ during his wide-ranging
career, has died.
Death came Monday morning in a Scottsdale,
Ariz., hospital after Farina suffered a blood clot in
his lung, according to his publicist, Lori De Waal. He
was 69.
Farina is survived by three sons, six grandchil-
dren and his longtime partner, Marianne Cahill.
For three decades, Farina was a character actor
who displayed remarkable dexterity, charm and
toughness, making effective use of his craggy face,
husky frame, ivory smile and ample mustache. He
could be as dapper as Fred Astaire and as full of
threat as Clint Eastwood. His gift has been described
as wry, tough-guy panache, and audiences loved him
for it.
‘‘Sometimes you can take those dramatic roles
and maybe interject a little humor into them, and I
think the reverse also works,’’ Farina said in a 2007
interview with The Associated Press.
Superman still
a huge favorite
SAN DIEGO (AP) —
The cape, the curl, the S
on the chest.
Superman is among
comics’ most recognizable
characters, and 75 years
after Cleveland teenag-
ers Jerry Siegel and Joe
Schuster’s Kryptonian
made his debut in the
pages of Action Comics
No. 1, his popularity
remains stratospheric.
At Comi c-Con
I n t e r n a t i o n a l ,
Superman’s presence
could be seen
everywhere —
in the attend-
ees wearing
versions of his
many costumes
and in scenes
from the tele-
vision serials,
cartoons and
films.
‘‘Superman
was the first
comic book
superhero and the first
cross-media sensa-
tion. Practically every-
one of every genera-
tion knows and recog-
nizes the character, so
that’s a huge asset for
his ongoing popular-
ity,’’ said Rob Salkowitz,
author of ‘‘Comic-Con
and the Business of Pop
Culture.’’
‘‘Batman has been
more successful in the
past couple of decades
because he is in some
ways more relatable
—but also because of the
times. Batman speaks
to our fears. He’s about
revenge and darkness,’’
he said. ‘‘Superman
speaks to our hopes.
He’s about transcend-
ing our limitations. He’s
about using vast power
for public good, not pri-
vate gain.’’
Jim Lee, co-publish-
er at DC Entertainment
who, along with writer
Scott Snyder, creat-
ed the new Superman
comic book ‘‘Superman
Unchained,’’ said few
characters have been as
relevant as Superman for
so long.
‘‘Name another char-
acter that’s been around
for 75 years that’s still
being published and rel-
evant,’’ challenged Lee.
‘‘There are very few
that are still relevant to
today’s culture and to
today’s audience that are
still being published,’’
Lee said, giving as exam-
ples that Superman was
a social crusader in the
1930s, fought Nazis in
the 1940s, was a yuppie
in the 1980s ‘‘and in the
‘90s had a mullet!’’
His popularity can be
measured in not just sales
of comics, but in tickets,
too. Zack Snyder’s ‘‘Man
of Steel’’ has made more
than $630 million at the
box office. And Saturday’s
announcement of a
sequel, of sorts, became
the buzz of Comic-Con
with news that it would
pair Superman with DC’s
other big name hero,
Batman.
‘‘Let’s face it, it’s
beyond mythological to
have Superman and our
new Batman facing off,
since they are
the greatest
super heroes
in the world,’’
Snyder said.
At a
C o m i c -
Con panel
e x p l o r i n g
Superman’ s
history, and
his future, a
team of cre-
ators who
have written the char-
acter, and actors on the
shows and films about
him, spoke Saturday
about Superman’s rele-
vance and invulnerability
to obsolescence.
‘‘Like Batman, this is
a very malleable charac-
ter that can change and
still be his core influ-
ence,’’ said writer Grant
Morrison, whose take on
the character in the pages
of ‘‘All-Star Superman’’
was critically lauded.
Morrison said that as
times change, so too, has
Superman, serving as a
mirror not to a Phantom
Zone, but to contempo-
rary real life.
That was a nod to the
darker tone in ‘‘Man of
Steel,’’ a grittier take on
not just Superman, but
his upbringing and influ-
ences, too.
‘‘He’s just reflecting a
general tendency, as he
always does. Superman
has to reflect what peo-
ple are feeling. I think it’s
an inevitable part of his
development,’’ Morrison
said. ‘‘If he’s dark now,
it’s because we’re all a
little bit dark.’’
With 75 years
now passed, DC
Entertainment co-pub-
lisher Dan DiDio said
that the comics will con-
tinue their retelling of
his early days, which
in the New 52 universe
that launched in 2011,
includes a budding
romantic relationship
with Wonder Woman, a
return trip to Krypton
and more.‘‘Superman
is such an identifier for
who we are and what we
are about — not just DC
Comics but just comics
in general,’’ DiDio said.
Woessner
BHS parents to meet for
2013 football season
A mandatory meeting will be held next
Monday (July 29) at Bellmont High School for
parents regarding the upcoming football season
Booster's Club.
The meeting is for all current parents and
incoming freshman parents as well and will start
at 6:30 p.m. in the BHS commons. Upcoming
events and this year's itinerary will be on top of
the list of items to discuss at the meeting.
MS fall sports schedule
Bellmont Middle School has announced their
fall opening schedule for MS sports this week
including volleyball, cross country, and foot-
ball.
On Monday, August 12, volleyball girls in
grades 7-8 will meet at 3:30-5 p.m. for tryouts
and Tuesday will be the sixth grade first prac-
tice starting at 3:15-5 p.m. On Thursday, cross
country (boys and girls) for grades 6-8 will take
place from 3:15-4:30 p.m., while football will
begin for 7-8 grades starting at 3:30-5 p.m.
A sports package will be required in football
and volleyball along with a few other require-
ments to play a fall sport. A current athletic
physical dated no earlier than April 1, 2013 is
first on the list of needs. A signed code of con-
duct and legal reporting waiver as well as a con-
cussion acknowledgement waiver and completed
BMS consent for medical treatment form. Good
standing academically and behaviorally will also
factor in to playing a sport in the fall.
These requirements must be in the BMS
office before a student-athlete can be allowed
to participate in any practices. Any student
who attends a parochial school in North Adams
school district and their school does not offer
a listed sport is encouraged to participate on a
BMS team.
Bixler wins Cancer event
A Cancer Shoot Out was held over the week-
end at Cross Creek Golf Course to raise money
for the fight for cancer.
Officially named the 2013 Whitlock Shootout
against Cancer, $665 was raised on Sunday
to support the worthy cause. Mark Bixler was
the overall winner of the event. Donations were
made to Adams County Community Foundation,
Dreams to Reality Fund at the Oncology unit, as
well as the memorial to Burt and Mary Whitlock
whom the tournament was named after.
Eleven different divisions were established for
the event including three men's flights led by
Mike Macke in flight one with Luke Ainsworth
landing second. In the men's flight number two,
Bixler was the winner with Phil Summers taking
second, while Drew Norby won the third flight
and Dale Manis took second.
On the ladies' side of the flights, Missy
Ainsworth was a winner in flight one with Linda
Wefel taking second and in the other group,
Linda Sharpe won first place with Christy Blythe
taking second. The senior ladies flight was won
by Mary Imel and Kay Jauregui took second.
Pat Wright won the boys junior flight with
Corey Coshow taking second. Cole Coshow was
the winner of the middle school flight with Ty
Razo placing second. The junior ladies flight was
won by Rachel Klingensmith with Macy Phegley
placing second.
The senior men had two flights with Kermit
Summers winning the first and Craig Coshow
taking second. In flight two, John Sharpe was a
winner and Kip Pancake took second.
Travel softball squad info
Tryouts for the 2013-14 Indiana Lazers will
be held on August 4 and August 7 at the Grace
College Softball Complex at Miller Field in
Winona Lake, Indiana.
The Indiana Lazers are an elite fastpitch
organization based in Warsaw and the league
is entering its third year. The Lazers offer
10-under, 12-under, 14-under, 16-under, and
18-under teams that compete in ASA, NSA,
USSSA, PGF,college exposure events.
The organization has made a call seeking the
top players from northern Indiana and beyond
to add to an already talented roster of players
from throughout the region.
On August 4, the 10 & 12-under groups will
practice from 1-3 p.m., while at 3-5 p.m. will be
the other three groups (14, 16, 18). On August
7, all age groups will meet at 6 p.m.
Participants are asked to arrive 30 minutes
prior to complete registration and warm-ups.
For more questions email the group at indi-
analazers@gmail.com. Their website is found at
indianalazers.com.
SportS HigHligHtS
By Dylan Malone
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
Search: Decatur Daily Democrat
Page 2B
Sports
Scoreboard
Page 1B Tuesday, July 23, 2013
inSide
MLB—Cubs 4, D’backs 2...Tigers 7, W. Sox 3...Reds 11, Giants 0...Mariners 2, Indians 1
Brewers’ Braun banned for the season
CHEVY SUPPORT—Gene Albers, Sales Manager of Tom Kelley Chevy, Buick, Ford of Decatur presents a
big check for $500 to Decatur Baseball Association players (L-R) Isaiah Wellman, Carter Thomas and Isaac
Ruble earlier this week. The contribution to local baseball is part of the national Chevy Baseball program
and local sponsorship for the DBA. Chevy and the local dealership also has contributed equipment plus
2,000 raffle tickets, most of which were sold by the local Decatur baseball families. The trio played for
Bixler Insurance of the Willie Mays League. (Photo by Jim Hopkins)
By RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer
NEW YORK (AP) —
Ryan Braun stood on a
spring training field and
proclaimed he was inno-
cent of using banned tes-
tosterone.
‘‘I would bet my life,’’
he said back then, ‘‘that
this substance never
entered my body at any
point.’’
Seventeen months
later, he accepted a
65-game suspension
from baseball and admit-
ted, ‘‘I am not perfect. I
realize now that I have
made some mistakes. I
am willing to accept the
consequences of those
actions.’’
The 2011 National
League MVP was sus-
pended without pay for
the rest of the season and
the postseason Monday,
the start of sanctions
involving players report-
edly tied to a Florida clin-
ic accused of distributing
performance-enhancing
drugs.
Attention quickly
turned to who’s next?
Will Alex Rodriguez or
any of the other players
tied in media reports to
the Biogenesis of America
clinic get disciplined and,
if so, when?
‘‘I’m pretty sure
Braunie won’t be the
last,’’ Detroit All-Star
outfielder Torii Hunter
said. ‘‘It’s going to be
for the next 100 years,
somebody’s going to try
to beat the system, and
as long as they keep
catching guys, the sys-
tem works.’’
Braun, a five-time All-
Star, accepted a penalty
15 games longer than the
one he avoided last year
when an arbitrator over-
turned his positive test
for elevated testosterone
because the urine sam-
ple had been improperly
handled.
More than a dozen
players were target-
ed by MLB follow-
ing a report by Miami
New Times in January
revealing relationships
between Biogenesis and
major leaguers. When
Yahoo Sports report-
ed in February that
Braun’s name was listed
in Biogenesis’ record,
Braun said his lawyer
had retained clinic owner
Anthony Bosch as a con-
sultant. Braun issued a
statement that said ‘‘I
have nothing to hide.’’
MLB Commissioner
Bud Selig announced
Braun’s penalty, cit-
ing the outfielder for
unspecified ‘‘violations’’
of both baseball’s drug
program and labor con-
tract. Braun’s ban will
cost him about $3 mil-
lion of his $8.5 million
salary. With the Brewers
in last place in the NL
Central, they aren’t like-
ly to have any playoff
games for him to miss.
‘‘I wish to apologize to
anyone I may have dis-
appointed,’’ Braun said.
‘‘I am glad to have this
matter behind me once
and for all, and I cannot
wait to get back to the
game I love.’’
Under the agreement
reached by MLB and
the players’ association
the specifics of Braun’s
admission were not made
public.
A person familiar with
the deal, speaking on
condition of anonymity
because no statements
were authorized, said 50
games of the penalty were
connected to Biogenesis.
The additional 15 games
stemmed from Braun’s
actions during the griev-
ance that overturned his
positive test from October
2011. The suspension
will count as a first viola-
tion of the drug program,
the person said.
‘‘I’m shocked, but peo-
ple make mistakes every
day,’’ Yankees pitcher
CC Sabathia said. ‘‘He’ll
serve his time but, hope-
fully, he’ll be able to con-
tinue his career.’’
Union head Michael
Weiner said last week
that arbitration hearings
for players contesting
suspensions likely would
not start until September,
which would delay any
penalty until next sea-
son. But he also indi-
cated the union would
urge players to make a
deal and get a suspen-
sion over with if there
was strong evidence of
guilt.
All-Pro LB Miller could face 4-game ban
By EDDIE PELLS and
ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Sports Writers
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
(AP) — The latest dis-
traction for the Denver
Broncos comes from All-
Pro linebacker Von Miller,
who insisted Monday he
did nothing wrong in the
face of reports he could
miss four games for vio-
lating the NFL’s drug pol-
icy.
‘‘I know I did nothing
wrong. I’m sure this’ll be
resolved fairly,’’ Miller
tweeted, acknowledging
he had seen the reports
and adding he was disap-
pointed the Broncos have
to open training camp
with this news hanging
over them.
ESPN first reported
the pending discipline
for Miller. A person with
knowledge of the situation
confirmed the possible
penalty to The Associated
Press. The person did
not want to be named
because the league hasn’t
announced any punish-
ment.
George Atallah, spokes-
man for the NFLPA, said
the players union was
working with Miller on
his appeal, adding via
Twitter: ‘‘I can also con-
firm that Von’s case does
not involve the Steroids
and Related Substances
Policy.’’
That would suggest
Miller’s case centers
around recreational drugs
instead.
Broncos spokesman
Patrick Smyth said the
team was unable to com-
ment on the penalty,
which could be overturned
by an appeal. Miller and
his agent didn’t return
messages left by AP.
The Broncos report to
training camp Wednesday
with big expectations but
a growing number of off-
the-field distractions, as
well.
Shortly after last sea-
son’s 13-3 campaign
ended with a loss to
Baltimore in the division
playoffs, none other than
Miller guaranteed a Super
Bowl title for Denver for
the 2013 season.
‘‘I wasn’t being arrogant
or cocky when I made the
guarantee. It was some-
thing bigger than myself,’’
Miller said in May in
explaining the comment.
He said he dedicated the
upcoming season to his
6-year-old cousin who
was injured in an auto
accident last winter.
Then, just last week,
left tackle Ryan Clady
signed a new contract
and, during interviews
to discuss the deal, said
it was, ‘‘Super Bowl or
bust, for the most part’’
for Denver.
It’s the kind of talk,
at least in public, that
Peyton Manning and
coach John Fox disdain.
It is, however, in line with
what Las Vegas says (At
odds ranging between
9-2 and 6-1, the Broncos
are widely listed as the
favorites to win the Super
Bowl) as well as the roster
Executive Vice President
John Elway has assem-
bled.
Cubs trade
Garza
Page 2B
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 2B • Tuesday, July 23, 2013
DDD SportS ScoreboarD
National League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 56 43 .566 —
Philadelphia 49 50 .495 7
Washington 48 51 .485 8
New York 43 52 .453 11
Miami 36 61 .371 19
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 59 37 .615 —
Pittsburgh 58 39 .598 1 1/2
Cincinnati 56 43 .566 4 1/2
Chicago 44 53 .454 15 1/2
Milwaukee 41 57 .418 19
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 51 47 .520 —
Arizona 51 48 .515 1/2
Colorado 48 52 .480 4
San Francisco 45 53 .459 6
San Diego 44 56 .440 8
———
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Mets 5, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 2
L.A. Dodgers 9, Washington 2
Chicago White Sox 3, Atlanta 1
Milwaukee 1, Miami 0, 13 innings
St. Louis 3, San Diego 2
Arizona 3, San Francisco 1
Colorado 4, Chicago Cubs 3
Monday’s Games
Pittsburgh 6, Washington 5
L.A. Dodgers 14, Toronto 5
Atlanta 2, N.Y. Mets 1
San Diego 5, Milwaukee 3
Miami 3, Colorado 1
Chicago Cubs 4, Arizona 2
Cincinnati 11, San Francisco 0
Tuesday’s Games
Cincinnati (Cingrani 3-1) at San
Francisco (Surkamp 0-0), 7:05 p.m.,
1st game
Pittsburgh (Cole 4-3) at Washington
(Jordan 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 3-6) at
Toronto (Redmond 1-1), 7:07 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 6-9) at N.Y. Mets
(C.Torres 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (T.Ross 0-4) at Milwaukee
(D.Hand 0-1), 8:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Pettibone 5-3) at St.
Louis (S.Miller 9-6), 8:15 p.m.
Miami (Fernandez 5-5) at Colorado
(Chacin 9-4), 8:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 6-6) at Arizo-
na (Corbin 11-1), 9:40 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 4-7) at Cincinnati
(G.Reynolds 0-0), 10:15 p.m., 2nd
game
Wednesday’s Games
Pittsburgh (Liriano 9-4) at Washing-
ton (Strasburg 5-7), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco 6-9) at Toron-
to (Rogers 3-4), 7:07 p.m.
Atlanta (Hudson 7-7) at N.Y. Mets
(Hefner 4-7), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (O’Sullivan 0-1) at Mil-
waukee (Lohse 6-7), 8:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Lannan 2-3) at St.
Louis (Westbrook 6-4), 8:15 p.m.
Miami (Ja.Turner 3-2) at Colorado
(J.De La Rosa 9-5), 8:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 6-9) at
Arizona (Kennedy 3-7), 9:40 p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 9-4) at San Fran-
cisco (Gaudin 4-1), 10:15 p.m.
American League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 60 41 .594 —
Tampa Bay 59 41 .590 1/2
Baltimore 57 43 .570 2 1/2
New York 52 47 .525 7
Toronto 45 53 .459 13 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 54 44 .551 —
Cleveland 52 47 .525 2 1/2
Kansas City 45 51 .469 8
Minnesota 42 54 .438 11
Chicago 39 57 .406 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 58 41 .586 —
Texas 55 44 .556 3
Seattle 47 52 .475 11
Los Angeles 46 51 .474 11
Houston 33 65 .337 24 1/2
———
Sunday’s Games
Tampa Bay 4, Toronto 3
Chicago White Sox 3, Atlanta 1
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 1
Detroit 4, Kansas City 1
Seattle 12, Houston 5
Oakland 6, L.A. Angels 0
Baltimore 4, Texas 2
Boston 8, N.Y. Yankees 7, 11 innings
Monday’s Games
Texas 3, N.Y. Yankees 0
L.A. Dodgers 14, Toronto 5
Tampa Bay 3, Boston 0
Baltimore 9, Kansas City 2
Detroit 7, Chicago White Sox 3
Oakland 4, Houston 3
Minnesota 4, L.A. Angels 3
Seattle 2, Cleveland 1
Tuesday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 3-6) at
Toronto (Redmond 1-1), 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 5-10) at
Boston (Lester 8-6), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-9) at
Texas (Ogando 4-2), 8:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Hammel 7-6) at Kansas
City (B.Chen 3-0), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 6-6) at Chicago
White Sox (H.Santiago 3-5), 8:10
p.m.
Oakland (J.Parker 6-6) at Houston
(Cosart 1-0), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Gibson 2-2) at L.A.
Angels (Hanson 4-2), 10:05 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 4-5) at Seattle
(E.Ramirez 0-0), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Oakland (Griffin 8-7) at Houston
(B.Norris 6-9), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pelfrey 4-7) at L.A.
Angels (Weaver 4-5), 3:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Kazmir 5-4) at Seattle
(J.Saunders 9-8), 3:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco 6-9) at Toron-
to (Rogers 3-4), 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 4-5) at Boston
(Doubront 7-3), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 7-7) at Texas
(D.Holland 8-5), 8:05 p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 5-3) at Kansas
City (E.Santana 6-6), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 7-7) at Chicago
White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-7), 8:10
p.m.
WNBA
By The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Chicago 12 4 .750 —
Atlanta 10 5 .667 1 1/2
Washington 8 9 .471 4 1/2
Indiana 7 8 .467 4 1/2
New York 6 10 .375 6
Connecticut 4 11 .267 7 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 13 3 .813 —
Los Angeles 12 5 .706 1 1/2
Phoenix 9 8 .529 4 1/2
Seattle 6 10 .375 7
Tulsa 6 13 .316 8 1/2
San Antonio 5 12 .294 8 1/2
———
Sunday’s Games
Indiana 65, Washington 52
Tulsa 90, Atlanta 63
Minnesota 82, Phoenix 77
Monday’s Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday’s Games
New York at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Chicago at Washington, 11:30 a.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Connecticut at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
2013 NFL Team Schedules
By The Associated Press
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Cleveland Browns
Sep. 8 Miami 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 at Baltimore 1 p.m.
Sep. 22 at Minnesota 1 p.m.
Sep. 29 Cincinnati 1 p.m.
Oct. 3 Buffalo 8:25 p.m.
Oct. 13 Detroit 1 p.m.
Oct. 20 at Green Bay 4:25 p.m.
Oct. 27 at Kansas City 1 p.m.
Nov. 3 Baltimore 4:25 p.m.
Nov. 10 BYE
Nov. 17 at Cincinnati 1 p.m.
Nov. 24 Pittsburgh 1 p.m.
Dec. 1 Jacksonville 1 p.m.
Dec. 8 at New England 1 p.m.
Dec. 15 Chicago 1 p.m.
Dec. 22 at N.Y. Jets 1 p.m.
Dec. 29 at Pittsburgh 1 p.m. Den-
ver Broncos
Sep. 5 Baltimore 8:30 p.m.
Sep. 15 at N.Y. Giants 4:25 p.m.
Sep. 23 Oakland 8:40 p.m.
Sep. 29 Philadelphia 4:25 p.m.
Oct. 6 at Dallas 4:25 p.m.
Oct. 13 Jacksonville 4:05 p.m.
Oct. 20 at Indianapolis 8:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 Washington 4:25 p.m.
Nov. 3 BYE
Nov. 10 at San Diego 4:25 p.m.
Nov. 17 Kansas City 4:05 p.m.
Nov. 24 at New England 6:30 p.m.
Dec. 1 at Kansas City 1 p.m.
Dec. 8 Tennessee 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 12 San Diego 8:25 p.m.
Dec. 22 at Houston 1 p.m.
Dec. 29 at Oakland 4:25 p.m. Indi-
anapolis Colts
Sep. 8 Oakland 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 Miami 1 p.m.
Sep. 22 at San Francisco 4:25 p.m.
Sep. 29 at Jacksonville 1 p.m.
Oct. 6 Seattle 1 p.m.
Oct. 14 at San Diego 8:40 p.m.
Oct. 20 Denver 8:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 BYE
Nov. 3 at Houston 8:30 p.m.
Nov. 10 St. Louis 1 p.m.
Nov. 14 at Tennessee 8:25 p.m.
Nov. 24 at Arizona 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 1 Tennessee 1 p.m.
Dec. 8 at Cincinnati 1 p.m.
Dec. 15 Houston 1 p.m.
Dec. 22 at Kansas City 1 p.m.
Dec. 29 Jacksonville 1 p.m.
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Chicago Bears
Sep. 8 Cincinnati 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 Minnesota 1 p.m.
Sep. 22 at Pittsburgh 8:30 p.m.
Sep. 29 at Detroit 1 p.m.
Oct. 6 New Orleans 1 p.m.
Oct. 10 N.Y. Giants 8:25 p.m.
Oct. 20 at Washington 1 p.m.
Oct. 27 BYE
Nov. 4 at Green Bay 8:40 p.m.
Nov. 10 Detroit 1 p.m.
Nov. 17 Baltimore 1 p.m.
Nov. 24 at St. Louis 1 p.m.
Dec. 1 at Minnesota 1 p.m.
Dec. 9 Dallas 8:40 p.m.
Dec. 15 at Cleveland 1 p.m.
Dec. 22 at Philadelphia 1 p.m.
Dec. 29 Green Bay 1 Detroit Lions
Sep. 8 Minnesota 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 at Arizona 4:05 p.m.
Sep. 22 at Washington 1 p.m.
Sep. 29 Chicago 1 p.m.
Oct. 6 at Green Bay 1 p.m.
Oct. 13 at Cleveland 1 p.m.
Oct. 20 Cincinnati 1 p.m.
Oct. 27 Dallas 1 p.m.
Nov. 3 BYE
Nov. 10 at Chicago 1 p.m.
Nov. 17 at Pittsburgh 1 p.m.
Nov. 24 Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
Nov. 28 Green Bay 12:30 p.m.
Dec. 8 at Philadelphia 1 p.m.
Dec. 16 Baltimore 8:40 p.m.
Dec. 22 N.Y. Giants 4:05 p.m.
Dec. 29 at Minnesota 1 p.m. New
Orleans Saints
Sep. 8 Atlanta 1 p.m.
Sep. 15 at Tampa Bay 4:05 p.m.
Sep. 22 Arizona 1 p.m.
Sep. 30 Miami 8:40 p.m.
Oct. 6 at Chicago 1 p.m.
Oct. 13 at New England 4:25 p.m.
Oct. 20 BYE
Oct. 27 Buffalo 1 p.m.
Nov. 3 at N.Y. Jets 1 p.m.
Nov. 10 Dallas 8:30 p.m.
Nov. 17 San Francisco 4:25 p.m.
Nov. 21 at Atlanta 8:25 p.m.
Dec. 2 at Seattle 8:40 p.m.
Dec. 8 Carolina 1 p.m.
Dec. 15 at St. Louis 1 p.m.
Dec. 22 at Carolina 1 p.m.
Dec. 29 Tampa Bay 1 p.m.
Monday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Sus-
pended Milwaukee OF Ryan Braun
for the remainder of the season and
postseason for multiple violations of
baseball’s drug program and labor
contract.
American League
CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Optioned
3B Brent Morel to Charlotte (IL).
Reinstated 1B/DH Paul Konerko from
the 15-day DL.
TEXAS RANGERS—Acquired RHP
Matt Garza from the Chicago Cubs
for RHPs C.J. Edwards and Justin
Grimm, INF Mike Olt, and a player to
be named. Reinstated RHP Yu
Darvish from the 15-day DL list.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Sent
RHP Brandon McCarthy to Reno
(PCL) for a rehab assignment.
CHICAGO CUBS—Recalled LHP
Chris Rusin from Iowa (PCL).
COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled
LHP Drew Pomeranz from Tulsa
(Texas). Optioned INF Josh Rutledge
to Colorado Springs (PCL).
ATLANTA BRAVES—Transferred
LHP Eric O’Flaherty to the 60-day
DL.
LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Sent
RHP Stephen Fife to Albuquerque
(PCL) for a rehab assignment.
MIAMI MARLINS—Sent RHP Jose
Ceda to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab
assignment. Optioned INF Derek
Dietrich and OF Marcell Ozuna to
Jacksonville (SL).
NEW YORK METS—Optioned
RHP Greg Burke to Las Vegas
(PCL). Reinstated 1B Justin Turner
from the 15-day DL.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS—
Fired hitting coach Rick Eckstein.
Promoted minor league hitting coor-
dinator Rick Schu to hitting coach.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
BOSTON CELTICS—Signed C
Vitor Faverani and G Phil Pressey.
DALLAS MAVERICKS—Traded the
draft rights to G Nick Calathes to
Memphis for a 2016 second-round
draft pick. Named Gersson Rosas
general manager.
LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS—
Signed C Byron Mullens.
TORONTO RAPTORS—Signed G
D.J. Augustin to a one-year contract.
UTAH JAZZ—Signed G John Lucas
III.
Women’s National Basketball Associ-
ation
NEW YORK LIBERTY—Signed G
Samantha Prahalis to a seven-day
contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Released
G Travelle Wharton.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—
Waived QB Jordan Rodgers.
HOUSTON TEXANS—Signed WR
DeAndre Hopkins. Released NT
Ra’Shon Harris. Placed S Orhian
Johnson and LB Sam Montgomery
on the active/non-football injury list.
Placed DE Earl Okine on the physi-
cally-unable-to-perform list.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—
Signed DL Anthony Rashad White.
NEW YORK JETS—Signed QB
Geno Smith to a four-year contract.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—
Announced CB Eric Wright failed his
physical and returned him to Tampa
Bay.
Cubs part with
Garza; Sox get 1B
Konerko back
By STEPHEN HAWKINS
AP Sports Writer
ARLINGTON, Texas
(AP) — The Texas Rangers
finally have Matt Garza in
their starting rotation.
Texas acquired Garza
from the Chicago Cubs in
a trade completed Monday,
getting a pitcher they had
long coveted just more
than a week before the
July 31 non-waiver trading
deadline and several days
after it initially appeared
that the two teams had a
deal in place.
‘‘He’s an extremely tal-
ented pitcher that’s had
success in the toughest of
divisions and the biggest
of stages, who’s throwing
the ball as well as anybody
right now,’’ Rangers gen-
eral manager Jon Daniels
said. ‘‘It’s a power reper-
toire, a little bit of a differ-
ent look from what we’ve
got, and he was available.
... He was in our opinion
the best guy on the mar-
ket.’’
The 29-year-old right-
hander provides a boost to
a starting rotation plagued
by injuries and a team
that slipped three games
behind Oakland in the
AL West after being swept
in a three-game weekend
series at home against
Baltimore.
Texas sent the Cubs
rookie right-hander Justin
Grimm, top prospect
third baseman Mike Olt
and Class-A pitcher C.J.
Edwards. There will also
be at least one player to
be named later, possibly
two, depending on who is
chosen by Chicago.
‘‘We paid a steep price
in talent to acquire Matt,
but we did so knowing
that we’ve got other guys
in the system,’’ Daniels
said. ‘‘What it comes down
to, ultimately why we got
him, beside the desire, is
we had the players to do
it.’’
Garza (6-1, 3.17 ERA),
who can become a free
agent after this season,
has made 11 starts since
missing the first seven
weeks this season with a
strained left lat muscle. He
is 5-0 with a 1.24 ERA his
last six starts.
Garza had been sched-
uled to start Monday night
for the Cubs in Arizona.
He will instead start for
the Rangers against the
New York Yankees, likely
Wednesday night.
Daniels said Garza
was scheduled to fly from
Arizona to Texas later
Monday night, and join
the Rangers on Tuesday.
Tampa Bay traded
Garza to Chicago instead
of Texas after the 2010
season. The Rangers were
also interested in Garza last
summer before he missed
the last two months with a
stress reaction in his right
elbow, and they instead
acquired Ryan Dempster
from the Cubs.
All-Star right-hander Yu
Darvish came off the dis-
abled list to start Monday
night’s game for the
Rangers at home against
the Yankees in the open-
er of a four-game series.
Darvish in essence missed
only one start because of a
right trapezius strain, but
hadn’t pitched since July
6.
Alexi Ogando is
scheduled to come off
his second DL stint
of the season to start
Tuesday night against
the Yankees.
Opening day starter
Matt Harrison made only
two starts in April before
two surgeries on a herniat-
ed disk in his lower back.
Nick Tepesch, another
rookie, went on the DL just
before the All-Star break
with elbow soreness. Colby
Lewis and Neftali Feliz are
both still rehabbing from
right elbow surgery last
year.
Garza has a 63-62
career record in 181 major
league games (178 starts)
with Minnesota (2006-07),
Tampa Bay (2008-10) and
the Cubs (2011-13). He
was a first-round draft
pick by the Twins in the
2005 amateur draft.
KONERKO RETURNS
CHICAGO (AP) — The
Chicago White Sox have
brought back first base-
man/designated hit-
ter Paul Konerko from
his rehab assignment at
Double-A Birmingham
and reinstated him from
the 15-day disabled list
before Monday’s game
against the Detroit Tigers.
Konerko was in the
lineup and batting fifth as
Chicago’s designated hit-
ter against Tigers starter
Max Scherzer.
Konerko was placed
on the DL July 3 with
a lower back strain and
has played one game since
June 25. He played three
games during his rehab
stint.
In 67 games for Chicago,
Konerko is hitting .249
with seven home runs and
30 runs batted in.
Nuggets pick up Robinson
By PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer
DENVER (AP) — A
person with knowledge
of the situation tells
The Associated Press
that point guard Nate
Robinson has agreed on
a two-year deal with the
Denver Nuggets.
The person spoke to the
AP on condition of ano-
nymity Monday because
the deal hadn’t been offi-
cially announced. The
deal was first reported
by the Denver Post.
The 5-foot-9 Robinson
averaged 13 points a con-
test for the Chicago Bulls
last season. He stepped
up his game in the post-
season, scoring 34 points
in a triple overtime win in
Game 4 against Brooklyn
and playing through the
flu later in that series.
Robinson joins a
crowded Denver back-
court that also includes
Ty Lawson, Evan
Fournier, Andre Miller,
rookie Erick Green and
newly acquired Randy
Foye.
Crossroads Classic to get
extension through 2016
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— Indiana’s Crossroads
Classic will be played
through at least 2016.
The four schools said
Monday that Purdue
will face Butler on Dec.
19, 2015, with Indiana
taking on Notre Dame
in the other game.
The Boilermakers and
Fighting Irish will square
off on Dec. 17, 2016, with
Butler and Indiana meet-
ing in the other game.
All games will again be
played at Bankers Life
Fieldhouse.
The doubleheader has
become one of the state’s
biggest regular-season
basketball events with
all four power confer-
ence schools participat-
ing — longtime Big Ten
members Indiana and
Purdue, new ACC mem-
ber Notre Dame and new
Big East member Butler.
It’s the second time the
schools have announced
a two-year extension
since the tourney began
in 2010.
Braves survive Mets; Cubs get rookie boost from Lake
NEW YORK (AP) —
Jason Heyward made a
diving catch with run-
ners on first and second
and two outs in the ninth
inning after pinch-hitter
Reed Johnson hit a go-
ahead single with two outs
in a two-run top half, lead-
ing the Atlanta Braves to
a 2-1, comeback victory
over the New York Mets on
Monday night.
Playing for the first time
after missing six games
with a strained right ham-
string, Heyward made a
long run to his right and
slid along the wet grass
to hold his glove up after
grabbing pinch-hitter
Justin Turner’s fly ball.
The Braves took advan-
tage of catcher John Buck’s
passed ball to score twice
in the ninth against closer
Bobby Parnell.
The Braves did not get
their first hit off Dillon Gee
until Freddie Freeman led
off the seventh with a sin-
gle. But the NL East lead-
ers ended their two-game
skid against Parnell (5-5).
Jordan Walden (4-1)
pitched the eighth for the
win.
CUBS 4, D’BACKS 2
PHOENIX, Ariz. (AP) —
Rookie Junior Lake hit his
first major league homer
and drove in three runs to
power Chicago to the vic-
tory over Arizona.
Lake’s two-run homer
off Tyler Skaggs with no
outs in the fifth inning
gave the Cubs a 3-0 lead.
Lake’s RBI single in the
ninth scored Darwin
Barney with an insurance
run.
Dioner Navarro hit a
solo home run in the sec-
ond for the Cubs.
The loss, coupled with
the Los Angeles Dodgers’
win in Toronto on Monday
night, dropped the
Diamondbacks out of first
place in NL West. They
held or shared the divi-
sion’s top spot since May
15. Arizona has lost four
of its last five.
Chris Rusin (1-0) got
the win, and Kevin Gregg
pitched the ninth for his
19th save.
REDS 11, GIANTS 0
SAN FRANCISCO (AP)
— Bronson Arroyo pitched
a seven-hitter for his sixth
career shutout, beating
Tim Lincecum and San
Francisco for his first vic-
tory at AT&T Park and No.
100 with Cincinnati.
Arroyo (9-7) struck
out six and didn’t walk a
batter in his 15th career
complete game, a 108-
pitch gem that ended
in 2 hours, 45 minutes.
Derrick Robinson ended it
with a tough catch in deep
center.
Devin Mesoraco and
Shin-Soo Choo homered
in the second inning off
Lincecum, pitching for the
first time since his no-
hitter at San Diego.
Jay Bruce also hit a
solo homer, Todd Frazier
added a three-run double
and Robinson, a late addi-
tion to the lineup, had
three hits.
RAYS 3, RED SOX 0
BOSTON (AP) — Matt
Moore pitched a two-hitter
for his first career shutout
and the Tampa Bay Rays
beat the Boston Red Sox
3-0 Monday night to move
within a half-game of first
place in the AL East.
Ben Zobrist had three
hits and James Loney
drove in two runs for the
Rays, who earned their
sixth consecutive victory
and won for the 18th time
in 20 games.
In his first start since
pitching a scoreless fifth
inning in the All-Star
game, Moore (14-3) gave
up Mike Napoli’s single
in the second and David
Ortiz’s base-hit in the sev-
enth. Ortiz took second
on a wild pitch — the only
baserunner to get past
first.
Moore walked one bat-
ter, struck out four and
needed just 109 pitches
to win his sixth consecu-
tive start. The Rays have
lost just twice since June
28, improving from fourth
place and seven games
out to within one win of
the division lead.
Brandon Workman
(0-1) made his second
career start, giving up two
runs on seven hits and
two walks, striking out
four in six innings.
RANGERS 3, YANKEES
0
ARLINGTON, Texas (AP)
— Yu Darvish allowed two
singles over 6 1-3 score-
less innings in his first
start in 16 days, combin-
ing with three relievers on
a three-hitter that carried
Texas past New York.
Darvish (9-4), who
last pitched July 6 before
going on the disabled list
with a right trapezius
strain, struck out four and
walked two. He left after
allowing consecutive bat-
ters to reach in the sev-
enth, having thrown 60 of
90 pitches for strikes.
Ivan Nova (4-3) struck
out four while throwing a
season-high 112 pitches
over seven innings.
TIGERS 7, WHITE
SOX 3
CHICAGO (AP) — Max
Scherzer outpitched Chris
Sale in a matchup of All-
Star starters, and Detroit
overcame Miguel Cabrera’s
injury to beat Chicago.
With one out in the bot-
tom of the fifth inning,
Cabrera was replaced at
third base by Don Kelly.
The 2012 AL MVP, who
appeared to be holding
his left side as he walked
off the field, was removed
with a sore hip flexor mus-
cle and will be evaluated
Tuesday.
Cabrera, who became
baseball’s first Triple
Crown winner in 45 years
last season, has played in
97 of Detroit’s 98 games
this year. He began the
day leading the AL with a
.359 batting average and
96 RBIs.
Scherzer (14-1) went
eight innings and allowed
four hits while striking out
five.
Sale (6-9) pitched eight
innings and gave up four
runs — two earned. He
yielded seven hits while
striking out 11.
MARINERS 2, INDIANS
1
SEATTLE (AP) —
Kendrys Morales and Mike
Zunino each homered,
Aaron Harang pitched
seven strong innings and
Seattle beat Cleveland to
win its season-high sev-
enth straight victory.
Morales led off the fourth
inning with a homer and
Zunino did the same in
the fifth off Indians starter
Ubaldo Jimenez, helping
Seattle increase its league-
leading total to 29 homers
in July. The seven-game
streak is the longest for
Seattle since winning eight
straight in August 2012.
Harang (5-8) gave up a
solo homer in the first to
Nick Swisher, and danced
around trouble for his sec-
ond win in the last three
starts. Tom Wilhelmsen
survived the ninth for his
22nd save.
Decatur Daily Democrat Tuesday, July 23, 2013 • Page 3B
www.GoSearchIdeal.com
Phone: (260) 724-9131
1-800-589-4332
Check Us Out At
Call The Decatur Daily Democrat Today! 724-2121
... we bring technology to you.
1421 Manchester St., Decatur
1/2 block west of U.S. 27 North
260-724-2276
www.innovativeconceptsav.com
Bose
Tv’s
Available!
© 2013 by Vicki Whiting, Editor Jeff Schinkel, Graphics Vol. 29, No. 32
It isn’t unusual for a fossil hunter
to occasionally find a fossil or two,
but when paleontologist Dr. Michael
Voorhies was looking for fossils near
Orchard, Neb., he found a lot more!
“Near sundown on a long day of
fossil prospecting,” Voorhies
remembers, “I was walking along
the valley rim above a creek. In cuts
and slopes, erosion had laid bare a
bed of silvery gray volcanic ash—
the fossil-bearing kind—sandwiched
between layers of sandstone.”
Voorhies discovered part of a baby
rhinoceros skull sticking out of the
ash. As Voorhies dug deeper, he
found an entire baby rhinoceros
skeleton! The skeleton was fully
articulated, which means that all the
bones were still intact and neatly laid
out in order.
Over the next few days, Voorhies
and his team discovered 12 more
complete skeletons from an
area no larger than your
classroom.
Look through today’s
newspaper to find:
four common nouns
four proper nouns
four pronouns
four adjectives
four verbs





ore than 11 million years
ago, a huge volcanic
eruption in what is
now Idaho blanketed
northeastern
Nebraska with
about a foot of ash.
Many of the
animals in the area,
which later came to
be called Ashfall, were
grass eaters. As they foraged
through the ash to find and eat grass,
they breathed in the fine, deadly ash.
Within a few days, their lungs had filled
with ash, and they suffocated.
Over the next few days, winds blew the
loose ash around. Eventually the ash
settled in the lowest places. The fossils
that Voorhies found were in an ancient
watering hole that got covered by about
eight feet of ash. The ash covered the
animals completely, keeping their
remains safe from predators and other
destruction for millions of years.
here is no other site in the
world like Ashfall. Rhinos,
horses, camels, birds, and
turtles were all caught in the
falling ash. Their quick death
and burial preserved not only
their skeletons, but in some
cases the food in their
stomachs when they died. The
remains of undigested food
help scientists understand the
plant life and eating habits of
animals that lived millions of
years ago.
Ash has covered
some of the words
in the story below.
Can you decide
where each word
here belongs?
Find the words in the puzzle. Then
look for each word in this week’s
Kid Scoop stories and activities.
Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical
words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.
More at www.facebook.com/RiddleRhymes
A N S W E R : D i n o s a u r f o s s i l
Read the newspaper to find out about
something new that has happened in your
community. Write a letter to your future
grandchildren about this news. Be sure to
tell who, what, when, where, why and how.
ASHFALL
VOORHIES
SUNDOWN
FOSSIL
VOLCANO
NOUN
CAMEL
EUBELODON
GIRAFFE
SKULL
IDAHO
PLANT
BABY
DOG
LAID
N
O
D
O
L
E
B
U
E
N
E
F
F
A
R
I
G
V
S
U
N
D
O
W
N
O
B
O
E
D
L
A
S
L
O
A
H
P
I
S
E
C
S
S
B
A
L
A
H
A
M
H
I
Y
D
A
L
N
R
F
A
W
L
I
N
O
U
A
O
G
C
F
E
T
A
L
K
N
O
U
N
B
R
L
K
W
S
D
V
D
Voorhies had discovered the remains of mammals that were
more than 11 million years old. These animals had died at a
watering hole following a massive volcanic eruption in what
is now the state of Idaho.
Color each odd-numbered square red and each
even-numbered square yellow to find out how many miles
from the volcano the Nebraska fossil site is located.
5
7
1
7
9
7
7
4
6
2
8
5
3
5
7
1
7
7
1
8
2
4
2
3
5
4
9
7
6
5
7
2
8
6
4
7
9
5
9
7
1
3
7
4
2
4
8
7
3
8
3
7
4
5
9
2
6
2
8
7
7
7
5
3
7
9
5
2
4
8
4
7
1
8
5
9
2
3
3
4
6
2
8
9
3
7
1
7
1
5
Deadline: August 18
Published: Week of September 15
Send your story to:
What’s your opinion?
Apples or oranges?
Which is better?
Please include your school and grade.
Classifieds
Page 4B • Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Decatur Daily Democrat
Physician Assistant (PA)
Van Wert County Hospital
Van Wert County Hospital is in search of a part-time Physician
Assistant to |oin our Emergency Services medical team. Cualifed applicants
prove to be dedicated professionals who excel at providing compassionate,
patient-centered care, maintain the highest integrity for standards of practice,
and have a philosophy for teamwork.
The PAis responsible for ... the provision of care to newborn, pe-
diatric, adolescent, adult, and elderly patients in the ER under the supervision
of a credentialed physician. Bachelor’s Degree is required. Master’s Degree,
unless grandfathered in. Applicants must be credentialed and obtain current
certifcation from the National Commission on the Certifcation of Physician
Assistants. Hours are 12p.m. – 10p.m. Days, weekends, and holidays vary.
Candidates are eligible for a generous benefts package including: vacation,
sick time, personal time, and a 401k retirement savings.
QuaIiñed candidates are encouraged to submit a
resume/appIication to:
Human Resources, Van Wert County HospitaI
1250 S. Washington St., Van Wert, OH 45891
Fax: 419-238-9390
E-mail: hr@vanwerthospital.org · Apply online: www.vanwerthospital.org
EOE
DO YOU MEET THE REQUIREMENTS?
We Have Maintenance Positions Open
Cheeseman LLC
A Fort Recovery Ohio ñnancially strong company providing LTL, TL, dedicated and
leasing services with a Neet of 250+ power units, 1000+trailers & multiple locations
Is Hiring Maintenance Coordinator
Requirements: CDL license or ability to obtain one, 2 year experience, strong com-
puter skills, willingness to learn and to improve existing systems and processes.
Desired Skills: preventative maintenance and repair, equipment speciñcation,
research an analysis, best practices, vendor relations, warranty submissions,
purchasing, remote diagnostics, communications, technician support, data manage-
ment and implementation of computer processes.
Maintenance Technician
Requirements: CDL License or ability to obtain one, 1 year experience in heavy
duty truck and/or trailer preventative maintenance and repair. Technical school
graduates considered with less experience.
PIease send resume in confdence, to
HRD@cheeseman.com or fax to 419-375-2437, Attn: HRD
Please no phone calls.
Adoption
ADOPT- Hoping to
share our hearts
and home with a
newborn baby.
Loving, nurturing
home for your
baby. Expenses
paid. Married cou-
ple Walt/Gina
1-800-315-6957
ADOPTION
Young, happily
married couple
wishing for new-
born. Love, affec-
tion, security and
opportunities await
your baby. Ex-
penses paid.
Please call
Jillian/David any-
time 800-571-3763
ADOPTION: DE-
VOTED FAMILY
PROMISES to
Cherish Your Child
Unconditionally. Fi-
nancially secure;
expenses paid.
Your Child is Al-
ready Loved in Our
Hearts! Selena &
Steve
1-866-877-4737
www.selenaand-
steveadopt.com
ADOPTION:-- A fi-
nancially secure
family, Love &
Laughter, Fashion
Exec yearns for 1st
baby. Expenses
paid. Claudine:
1-800-989-8921
Auction
Real Estate
Absolute Internet
Auction35 Real Es-
tate Properties Bid-
ding Ends: August
8- 2pm INProp-
ertyAuctions.com
Jimmie Dean Cof-
fey, Tim Ellis Real-
tors 812-824-6000
Lic #AC30200042
Seller: Jones Es-
tate
Internet-Only Auc-
tion. Bloomington
Home 8+/- Acres
Ends August 14th,
2:00pm Preview:
August 5th
5:00-7:00pm. Cof-
fey Realty & Auc-
tion 812-824-6000
INPropertyAuc-
tions.com Lic
#AU01049934
Seller: Rogers
Trust
Automotives
For Sale
GUARANTEED
TOP DOLLAR
FOR JUNK CARS,
TRUCKS & VANS
CALL JACK @
260-466-8689
Apartments
For Rent
2 Bedroom Apart-
ment, Range, Re-
frigerator, AC,
Laundry hook up,
Reasonable Utili-
ties, Off Street
Parking. Call
260-223-4949
2 Bedroom Up-
stairs Apartment,
appliances in-
cluded,
washer/dryer
hook-up, Deposit,
references re-
quired. $340-pre-
pay discount avail-
able. 260-724-4000
FOR RENT 2-bed-
room apartment
w/appliances. All
Carpeted, Nice Lo-
cation. Available
now. References &
Deposit required.
$355.00 month.
PRESTIGE
REALTY
260-724-7023.
IMMEDIATE OC-
CUPANCY with ap-
proved application.
Rental assistance
may be available.
Country Brook
apartments have 1
& 2 bedrooms with
on-site laundry and
24 hour emergency
maintenance. Call
260-724-
4616/TDD#
800-743-3333 or
stop by our rental
office at 522 S 13th
St. in Decatur.
EHO
NEW RENT SPE-
CIAL! 17th Street
apartments now
available. Spa-
cious 2 bedroom
apartment homes
with 1 bath and all
appliances includ-
ing a full size
washer & dryer,
many recently re-
modeled, for just
$385/month for the
ground level and
$345/balcony. De-
posit special of
$250. Call (260)
724-4616 or stop
by 522 S. 13th St.
for more informa-
tion. EHO
Property
For Rent
2 Bedroom house
127 N 9th St, Re-
frigerator & stove
furnished. $500 de-
posit $500 1st
month rent due at
signing. 1 year
lease call
260-701-2142
Property
For Sale
NICE LIKE NEW
VILLA on the
Meadows of Cross
Creek. Ditch the
lawn care and
snow removal and
move out to this 2
bedroom 2 full bath
villa. Call Jason
Kreigh to schedule
your private show-
ing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St.
Jason M. Kreigh
Sales Associate
Cell 413-1446
WELL CARED
FOR HOME. Home
features: oak
woodwork through-
out, basement, ga-
rage with additional
second floor stor-
age. Home also
features third floor
storage. Outdoor
8x10 storage shed
is not included in
the price. Call Ja-
son Kreigh.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St.
Jason M. Kreigh
Sales Associate
Cell 413-1446
For Sale
By Owner
10195 N 200 E
Log
cabin--1,800sq.ft.
setting on 5
wooded acres, 3
possibly 4 bed-
rooms, 2 1/2 baths,
utility room, full fin-
ishable walkout
basement, cathe-
dral ceilings in liv-
ing area w/ cat-
walk, fireplace on
main floor and
wood burner in
basement, geother-
mal heating/cool-
ing, 40x63 pole
building w/ 14x14
overhead doors,
50x50 fenced ken-
nel w/ 8x12 shed.
260-724-2783
3636 N. Shady
Lane (Oakwood)
$250,000
Pictures and De-
scription...www.ow
ners.com/WTW844
2
4 Bedrooms, 4
Bathrooms, 2 Fire-
places, 2 Kitchens,
Finished Base-
ment, Indoor Pool,
Elevator, Gym,
Kennel, Wrap-
around
Driveway,...Every-
thing Customized.
(260)724-7155
Appliances
For Sale
All GE refrigerators
& freezers, Now on
Sale!
All GE Gas/Electric
ranges now at
summer sizzling
prices!
All GE washers &
dryers now at sum-
mer sizzling prices!
Klenk’s Sales &
Service
1125 Southampton
Dr., Decatur, IN
724-7623
GE SLATE
Instant In-Store
Rebate For A Lim-
ited Time...GE’s
Newest Premium
Appliance
Finish-Slate
Welcome GE’s
new fashion-for-
ward finish, Slate: a
color that is just as
stylish & sophisti-
cated as stainless
steel but with a
strong, earthy feel.
A warm, inviting al-
ternative to stain-
less steel.
Special Package
Pricing Available!
$$SAVE$$
$$SAVE$$
$$SAVE$$
When It Comes To
Appliances or
Parts...Think
Klenk’s Sales &
Service
Visit Us
www.facebook.co
m/klenks.sales or
www.klenkssales.c
om
KLENK’S
Sales And Serv-
ices
1125 Southampton
Drive, Decatur
724-7623
Monay-Friday 8-6
Saturday 8-3
Building
Supplies
For Sale
Roofing- Half
Priced: Economy
Dimensional Shin-
gles $54 per sq, In-
terior Doors $5 &
up, Wood Interior
Trim 50% off.
www.Cardwell-
HomeCenter.com,
3205 Madison Ave-
nue, Indianapolis
(317) 788-0008
Pets/Supplies
Storage
FREE FOOD
WITH
EVERY--puppy
sold before
7/27/14. Poms, Do-
bes, Chihuahuas,
Morkies, Shihtzus,
more! Garwick’s
The Pet People
419-795-5711
garwicksthepet-
people.com. (A)
FREE KITTENS
North of Decatur,
IN area. If inter-
ested please call
260-728-2191
Garage Sale
Yard Sale 1417 N
2nd St corner of
Mix & 2nd 4 days
Friday July 19 7-3
Wednesday July 24
8-3 Thursday July
25 8-3 Friday July
26 7-3
Couch, lawn-
mower, boy clothes
6-9mo 12mo & 4-8,
girls & juniors,
womens & mens,
shoes, knick-
knacks, books and
a crib set
Lost
LOST!!!
Large male, gray
housecat from The
Meadows of Cross-
creek, neutered
and declawed, an-
swers to the name
Alize
If seen please call
443-350-2731 or
260-446-9135
Employment
Wanted
Wanted-construc-
tion work,
interior-exterior re-
modeling, roofing,
siding, windows
and doors, restore
old barns, concrete
Reasonable rates
260-440-7140
leave message
General
Help Wanted
Can You Dig It?
Heavy Equipment
Operator Training!
3 Weeks Hands On
Program. Bulldoz-
ers, Backhoes, Ex-
cavators. Lifetime
Job Placement As-
sistance. National
Certifications. VA
Benefits Eligible.
1-866-362-6497
State Line Auto
Parts always pays
top dollar for your
unwanted cars,
trucks, machinery,
and cub cadet
lawn-mowers! Call
724-3874
Apartments
For Rent
Appliances
For Sale
Copy
Editor/Proofreader
Annie's, in Berne,
Ind., is seeking a
copy editor who is
passionate about
the written word
and doing their part
to make sure it is
correct. Responsi-
bilities include
some fact checking
and proofreading
for grammar, spell-
ing, punctuation
and consistency on
deadline in team
environment. Must
have experience
with AP and Chi-
cago style, comput-
ers and managing
files. Must know
Word and com-
menting in
Acrobat. Bache-
lor's degree in Eng-
lish, journalism or
communication re-
quired.
If you would like to
join our growing
Internet marketing
team, please check
out the company
Web site,
www.drgnetwork.co
m for more infor-
mation. Apply un-
der Career Oppor-
tunities. EOE
General
Help Wanted
Hair Stylist/Barbers
Openings in
Bluffton & Portland
Are you stuck in a
rut? Need a fresh
outlook. Come talk
to us! If you like to
have fun while
striving for the best,
then GREAT
CLIPS needs you!
Both FT and PT
positions available.
Must be licensed
cosmetologist or
barber.
Base Wage
Student Loan
Reim.
Most Equipment
Provided
NO booth rent.
CONTACT BETH
260-414-2584
OR
Apply online @
www.greatclips.com
MACHINIST
Large industrial re-
pair center located
in Wolf Lake, IN is
looking for a stable
experienced Ma-
chinist. Large
manual equipment,
experience a plus.
No CNC work.
Wage based on ex-
perience.
Please apply to:
bmrgroup@hot-
mail.com or call
260-635-2195
Reporter
The Deca-
tur Daily Democrat
is seeking an en-
thusiastic and hard
working general as-
signment reporter
for Adams County.
This is a fulltime
entry level position.
Responsibilities will
include writing
news and general
feature stories,
coverage of as-
signed beat. You
must possess
strong writing and
photography skills.
Have some pagina-
tion experience us-
ing InDesign.
Knowledge of AP
style a plus. Send
Resume and writ-
ing samples to Ron
Storey, publisher,
Decatur Daily
Democrat, 141 S.
2nd Street, Deca-
tur, IN. 46733 or
Email to: pub-
lisher@decatur-
dailydemocrat.com
Network Systems
Administrator
DRG is seeking an
experienced sys-
tems administrator
in our Berne, IN lo-
cation to provide
network and sys-
tems support in a
multi-platform,
service-oriented
environment. Work-
ing within a MS and
MAC setting, the
qualified individual
will be adept at di-
agnosing and re-
solving hardware
and software prob-
lems, provide
end-user support
for desktop, server,
phone system, and
network infrastruc-
ture. Any combina-
tion of education or
experience that
provides required
knowledge, skills
and abilities to per-
form the essential
functions of the po-
sition. Strong com-
munication skills,
knowledge of net-
work topologies
and protocols such
as physical wiring,
TCP/IP, LAN,
WAN, wireless, and
related hardware
are needed, as is a
strong knowledge
of MS AD, Win-
dows Server
2003/2008,
ATT/Lucent/Avaya
telephony systems
and current Micro-
soft Office and
Adobe Creative
suites.
If you would like to
join our growing
Internet marketing
team, please check
out the company
Web site,
www.drgnetwork.co
m for more infor-
mation. Apply un-
der Career Oppor-
tunities. EOE
WANTED: LIFE
AGENTS; Earn
$500 a day; Great
Agent Benefits;
Commissions Paid
Daily; Liberal
Underwriting; Leads,
Leads, Leads. LIFE
INSURANCE,
LICENSE REQUIRED.
1-888-713-6020
Drivers
Help Wanted
DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED
NOW at Stevens
Transport! New
drivers earn $750
per week. No CDL?
No Problem! CDL
& Job Ready in 15
days.
1-877-649-9611
Driver Trainees
Needed Now! Learn to
drive for
US Xpress! Earn
$800+ per week!
No experience
needed! CDL Trained
and Job-Ready in 15
days! 1-800-882-7364
Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
Learn to drive for
US Xpress at TD!
New Drivers earn
$800/per week &
Full Benefits!
No experience
needed!
CDL & Job Ready
in just 3 weeks!
DRIVERS CAN
GET HOME
NIGHTLY IN
NORTHERN INDI-
ANA!1-800-882-
7364 U.S. XPRESS
SERVICE THAT
MATTERS DRIVEN
BY INNOVATION
Drivers
Help Wanted
GEI-CORP
TRUCKING HIR-
ING--Class A CDL
Drivers. Regional
and OTR Drivers
needed with 2 years
experience, good
MVR, no accidents,
newer equipment,
termi- nal in the
Markle area. We
have benefits,
vacation pay and
home on the
weekends! Pay is
based on
performance, so
please call 260-
758-2068. (A)
GORDON TRUCK-
ING- CDL-A Driv-
ers Needed! Up to
$4,000 Sign On
Bonus! Starting
Pay Up to .46 cpm.
Full Benefits, Ex-
cellent Hometime,
No East Coast. Call
7 days/wk! Team-
GTI.com 888-757-
2003.
PART TIME
LOCAL DRIVER
WANTED
Must have
-Class A CDL
-2 yrs. experience
-1-3 days per week
as needed
-hourly pay work
up to 12-14hrs per
day
Please call
Jennifer at
800864-1688 ex
634 or apply online
at: bohreninc.com
Services
AIRLINE
CAREERS begin
here-Get FAA ap-
proved Aviation
Tech training. Fi-
nancial aid if quali-
fied. Job placement
assistance. CALL
Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
877-523-5807
www.FixJets.com
ACO190
Amish Quality
Work. Horse and
Pole Barns. Ga-
rages, Decks,
Roofing and Siding.
Jay Mar Construc-
tion 765-716-3687.
One Year Labor
Guaranteed. Owner,
Johnny Wengerd.
DirecTV- Over 140
channels only
$29.99 a month.
Call Now! Triple
savings! $636.00 in
Savings, Free up-
grade to Genie &
2013 NFL Sunday
ticket free!! Start
saving today!
1-800-246-1820
DISH TV Retailer-
Starting at $19.99/
month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed
Internet starting at
$14.95/month
(where available.)
SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Instal-
lation! CALL Now!
1-800-283-0560
HELP WANTED
Can You Dig It?
Heavy Equipment
Operator Training!
3 Weeks Hands On
Program. Bulldoz-
ers, Backhoes, Ex-
cavators. Lifetime
Job Placement As-
sistance. National
Certification. VA
Benefits Eligible.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
Services
Highspeed Internet
EVERYWHERE By
Satellite! Speeds
up to 12mbps!
(200x faster than
dial-up.) Starting at
$49.95/mo. CALL
NOW & GO FAST!
1-866-414-1820
Health/
Fitness
HAVE YOU DE-
VELOPED DIABE-
TES FROM LIPI-
TOR? If you used
Lipitor between De-
cember 1996 and
the present time
and were diag-
nosed with diabe-
tes while taking
Lipitor, you may be
entitled to compen-
sation. Call Charles
H. Johnson toll-free
1-800-535-5727
Students
Wanted
HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA FROM
HOME. 6-8 weeks.
ACCREDITED. Get
a diploma. Get a
job! No comptuer
needed. FREE bro-
chure.
1-800-264-8330.
Benjamin Franklin
High School
www.diplomafrom-
home.com
Vacation
Get-A-Way
VACATION CAB-
INS FOR RENT IN
CANADA. Fish for
walleyes, perch,
northerns. Boats,
motors, gasoline in-
cluded. Call Hugh
1-800-426-2550 for
free brochure.
Website
www.bestfishing.com
Financial
Services
WE CAN HELP!
GOOD BAD
CREDIT, BANK-
RUPTCY, NEED
CASH FAST! PER-
SONAL LOANS,
BUSINESS START
UP AVAILABLE.
LOANS FROM $4K
NO FEES, FREE
CONSULTATIONS,
QUICK, EASY
AND CONFIDEN-
TIAL, CALL 24HRS.
TOLL FREE 888)
220-2239
Real Estate
#6174- New build-
ing site located in
the NEW Meadows
of Cross Creek!!
#6157- 1.4 acre
Building B-2 (busi-
ness zoned) lot, lo-
cated at Morning-
star Drive
#6159- Business
Zoned building
1,787 SF with full
basement.
#6181- 1.9 acre
business zoned lot.
Perfect for storage
units or apart-
ments.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
Steven J Kreigh
Broker/Owner
Cell 341-5077
**MONROEVILLE**
A lot of house for
the money!! 4 to 5
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, 2 Car At-
tached Garage,
Gas F/A and C/A.
This home has a lot
to offer call today
for more info.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St. De-
catur 260-724-9131
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.com
Email: laceycaf-
fee@idealbuilders.com
Cell 260-223-3534
Office 260-724-9131
701 Heatherwood
Lane, Ossian, IN
Country Meadows
Subdivision
A New Floorplan
from Ideal which
has the following
asked-for features
form customers-
kitchen pantry, 2.5
bathrooms, 2
walk-in closets in
the master bed-
room- larger ga-
rage- this house
has them all! Call Al
for appointment to
see 341-8550 Ideal
Suburban Homes
Real Estate
105 W. Honey-
suckle Lane, Deca-
tur
*3 bedrooms, 1
bath
*1-car garage
*Foreclosed home
at a great value
*Priced in the
$30’s
345 W. Line St.,
Geneva
*3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths
*1,943 square feet
*18x12 garage
*Priced in the
$30’s
3007 N. Salem
Road, Decatur
*3 bedrooms
*22x17 garage
*100x100 lot
* Priced in the
$30’s
Coldwell Banker
Roth Wehrly Gra-
ber
Zoda Real Estate
Group
724-8000
Ronda Cowans
260-223-2309(cell)
Andy Zoda
260-413-7462(cell)
135 W. Quayle
Run, Decatur
*3 bedrooms
*new kitchen
*shed & deck
*Priced in the
$60's
Coldwell Banker
Roth Wehrly Gra-
ber
Zoda Real Estate
Group
724-8000
Ronda Cowans
(260)223-
2309(Cell)
Andy Zoda
(260)413-
7468(Cell)
2 story home with
2 full baths.
Features: gas hot
water heat and
central air. Unat-
tached 2 car ga-
rage and profes-
sionally landscaped
lot. Call Jason To-
day.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
(260)724-9131
235 Oberli Street,
Berne
*newer roof, win-
dows, furnace, cen-
tral air
*24x32 garage w/
workshop area
*20x14 storage
shed
*Priced in the
$70's
Coldwell Banker
Roth Wehrly Graber
Zoda Real Estate
Group 724-8000
Ronda Cowans
(260)223-2309(Cell)
Andy Zoda
(260)413-7468(Cell)
2724 E. 250 North,
Bluffton
*large 3/4 acre lot
*3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths
*27x24 garage,
storage shed
*Priced in the
$120’s
Roth Wehrly Graber
Zoda Real Estate
Group 724-8000
Ronda Cowans
(260)223-2309(Cell)
Andy Zoda
(260)413-7468(Cell)
Diabetic Test Strips
WANTED
We Buy
Most Brands.
Pay Up To
$20/box.
Fast and Honest.
1-800-979-8220
5 Box Minimum • Unexpired Only
www.QuickCash4TestStrips.com
CA$H FOR
CARS/TRUCKS:
Get A Top Dollar
INSTANT Offer!
Running or Not.
Damaged?
Wrecked? OK! We
Pay Up To
$20,000!
Call Toll Free:
1-800-871-9712
Classifieds
Tuesday, July 23, 2013 • Page 5B
Decatur Daily Democrat
F O R
S A L E
BY OWNER
3BR, 2BA, Newer appliances, furnace,
windows, well, septic, new roof, fireplace,
new garage door, 2 car garage, finished
basement, energy efficient, 1 acre with
mature trees, also orchard. Stateline 2 miles
North of 224, 8570 N 700 E Decatur
260-244-0240 amer.axle@gmail.com
134 Brandywine Lane 1845 sq.ft house w/
575 sq.ft 2 car attached garage. 3BR/2Bath.
Newly remodelled kitchen & bathrooms. New
laminate flooring. Vaulted ceiling &fire place
in living room. New stainless steel appli-
ances. Priced to sell! 260-223-0266
810 E. Monroe Street
BIGGER THAN IT LOOKS!!!
Beautifully landscaped, 4 bedroom, 1 bathroom
1348 sq.ft. ranch. Close to Bellmont High School.
Low property taxes, great starter home.
PRICED TO SELL!!! (260)223-7332
Four bedrooms, two garages, two-story
plus basement, fireplace, located on
one+acre wooded lot with mature trees in
AC school district
4300 W 500 N Decatur
260-547-4564
Home for sale in AC district Country
home in Adams Central district. Built in
2006. Approx 2300 sq. ft. with additional
Finished Basement. 2.02 Acres. 40'x80'
Barn with hayloft basketball court.
3 Bedrooms, possible 4th. 3 Full Baths.
Geothermal Heating and Cooling.
$265,000. 260-413-6696
Ranch Home for Sale. Anthony Wayne
Meadows. 3 Br, 2 Bath, 2 car garage, fenced
yard, 1571sf, new roof, heated floors, all
appliances included. 910 Yorktown Road
$133,900 OBO. Call 260-223-4455
3636 N. Shady Lane (Oakwood)
$250,000 Pictures and Description.
www.owners.com/WTW8442
4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 2 Fireplaces, 2
Kitchens, Finished Basement, Indoor Pool,
Elevator, Gym,Kennel, Wrap around
Driveway,...Everything Customized.
(260)724-7155
10195 N 200 E
Log cabin--1,800sq.ft. setting on 5
wooded acres, 3 possibly 4 bedrooms, 2
1/2 baths, utility room, full finishable
walkout basement, cathedral ceilings in
living area w/ catwalk, fireplace on main
floor and wood burner in basement,
geothermal heating/cooling, 40x63 pole
building w/ 14x14 overhead doors, 50x50
fenced kennel w/ 8x12 shed.
260-724-2783
Legal Notice
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S
SALE
By virtue of a certihed
copy of a decree to me di-
rected from the Clerk of
the Adams Circuit Court of
Adams County, Indiana, in
Cause No. 01C01-1208-MF-
0054 wherein Wells Fargo
Bank, NA was Plaintiff, and
Carla J. Mattingly and Mort-
gage Electronic Registration
Systems, Inc., as nominee
for Citibank Federal Sav-
ings Bank, a federal savings
bank were Defendants, re-
quired me to make the sum
as provided for in said De-
cree with interest and cost,
I will expose at public sale
to the highest bidder, on the
10 day of Sept., 2013 at the
hour of 1:00pm, or as soon
thereafter as is possible, at
313 South 1st Street, Deca-
tur, IN 46733, the fee simple
of the whole body of Real
Estate in Adams County, In-
diana.
Beginning at a point on
the East line of Inlot Seven
Hundred Twenty-three (723)
in Sylvester Spangler's Sub-
division of Outlot Two Hun-
dred Seventy-three (273), in
Joseph Crabb's third Addi-
tion to the Town (now City)
of Decatur, Adams County,
Indiana, which point is Thir-
ty-six (36) feet Five and one-
half (5 1/2) inches South of
the Northeast corner of
said Inlot Seven Hundred
Twenty-three (723); thence
South on the said East line
of the Southeast corner
of said Inlot; thence West
along the South line of said
Inlot to the Southwest corner
thereof; thence North along
the West line of said Inlot to
a point thereon Forty-seven
(47) feet Five and One-Half
(5 1/2) inches South of the
Northwest corner of said In-
lot Seven Hundred Twenty-
three (723); thence East to
the point of beginning.
More commonly known as
352 N 11th St., Decatur, IN
46733-1512
Parcel No. 01-05-03-102-
007.000-032
Together with rents, issues,
income, and prohts thereof,
said sale will be made with-
out relief from valuation or
appraisement laws.
"SEAL"
Shane Rekeweg, Sheriff of
Adams County
MATTHEW S. LOVE, Plain-
tiff Attorney
Attorney # 18762-29
FEIWELL & HANNOY, P.C.
251 N. Illinois Street, Suite,
1700
Indianapolis, IN 46204-1944
(317) 237-2727
Washington Township
The Sheriff's Department
does not warrant the accu-
racy of the street address
published herein.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S
SALE
TO THE OWNERS OF
THE WITHIN DESCRIBED
REAL ESTATE AND ALL
INTERESTED PARTIES
By virtue of a certihed copy
of a decree to me directed
from the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Adams County, In-
diana, in cause No. 01C01-
1111-MF-0069, wherein
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Company as Trustee
for the Holders of the First
Franklin Mortgage Loan
Trust 2005-FF2, Mortgage
Pass-Through Certihcates,
Series 2005-FF2 was Plain-
tiff, and Jose D. Rodriguez,
Yolanda C. Ruiz and Adams
County Memorial Hospi-
tal C/O Summit Account
& Computer Service, Inc.
were the Defendants, requir-
ing me to make the sum as
provided for in the said De-
cree with interest and costs,
I will expose at public sale
to the highest bidder, on the
10 day of September, 2013,
at 1:00pm local time of said
day, at Adams County Jail,
313 S. First Street, Decatur,
IN 46733, the fee simple of
the whole body of Real Es-
tate in Adams County, Indi-
ana:
INLOT NUMBER TWEN-
TY-SEVEN (27) IN CITI-
ZEN'S FIRST ADDITION TO
THE CITY OF DECATUR,
INDIANA.
More Commonly known
as: 703 Schirmeyer Street,
Decatur, Indiana 46733
Property ID Number: 01-
05-03-306-066.000-022
Together with rents, issues,
income and prohts thereof,
said sale will be made with-
out relief from valuation or
appraisement laws.
"SEAL"
Shane Rekeweg, Sheriff
Adams County, Indiana
Susan A. Clark, Plaintiff
Attorney
Attorney No. 29635-45
JOHNSON, BLUMBERG &
ASSOCIATES LLC
230 W. Monroe St., Ste.
1125
Chicago, IL 60606
312-541-9710
THE SHERIFF'S DEPART-
MENT DOES NOT WAR-
RANT THE ACCURACY OF
THE STREET ADDRESS
PUBLISHED HEREIN.
Legal Notice
City of Decatur IN
Plan Commission
Notice of Public Hearing
Notice is hereby given that
the City of Decatur Plan
Commission will hold a
public hearing on Tuesday,
August 6, 2013, at 4:30pm,
at City Hall, 225 W Mon-
roe St, Decatur, IN 46733
to review the following
consideration(s):
Applicant(s) to run consecu-
tively:
(1) Brad Logan, owner,
and Jacob Perez, applicant,
are requesting the rezoning
of property located at 409
North 9th Street, Decatur, IN
46733 from B-1 Business to
R-1 Residential.
All information pertaining
WRWKHSURSRVDOLVRQÀOHDQG
may be examined in its en-
tirety by the public at the of-
ÀFHRIWKH%XLOGLQJ,QVSHFWRU
at City Hall, 225 W Monroe
St, Decatur IN 46733 be-
tween the hours of 8:00 am
to 4:30pm.
Written suggestions or
objections to the provisions
of said proposed projects
VKDOOEHÀOHGZLWKWKH&LW\RI
Decatur Plan Commission
at the time and place speci-
ÀHG
Said hearing may be con-
tinued from time to time as
necessary.
Interested persons desir-
ing to present their views
upon the proposed amend-
ment, either in writing or
verbally, will be given the op-
portunity to be heard at the
above mentioned time and
place.
Roger W. Gage
Superintendent Building/
Zoning Department
plan10
Legal Notice
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S
SALE
%\ YLUWXH RI D FHUWLÀHG
FRS\ RI D GHFUHH WR PH GL-
UHFWHGIURPWKH&OHUNRIWKH
6XSHULRU &RXUW RI $GDPV
&RXQW\ ,QGLDQD LQ &DXVH
No. 01D01-1302-MF-0002
ZKHUHLQ -30RUJDQ &KDVH
%DQN 1DWLRQDO $VVRFLD-
WLRQ ZDV WKH 3ODLQWLII DQG
&KDUOHV&7XUQHUDQG/LQGD
0 7XUQHU ZHUH WKH 'HIHQ-
GDQWVUHTXLULQJPHWRPDNH
WKH VXP DV SURYLGHG IRU LQ
VDLG 'HFUHH ZLWK LQWHUHVW
DQG FRVWV , ZLOO H[SRVH DW
SXEOLF VDOH WR WKH KLJKHVW
ELGGHU RQ 6HSWHPEHU
DWWKHKRXURISP
RIVDLGGD\DW$GDPV&RXQ-
W\/DZ(QIRUFHPHQW&HQWHU
6RXWKVW6WUHHW'HFD-
WXU,1WKHIHHVLPSOH
RI WKH ZKROH ERG\ RI 5HDO
(VWDWHLQ$GDPV&RXQW\,Q-
GLDQD
In lot Number Two Hun-
dred Seventeen (217) in
Joseph Crabb's Second
Western Addition to the
town, now city, of Decatur,
Indiana.
3DUFHO 1XPEHU
103-010.000-022
&RPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV
1 WK 6W 'HFDWXU ,QGLDQD
7RJHWKHUZLWKUHQWVLVVXHV
LQFRPH DQG SURÀWV WKHUHRI
VDLG VDOH ZLOO EH PDGH ZLWK-
RXW UHOLHI IURP YDOXDWLRQ RU
DSSUDLVHPHQWODZV
6($/
Shane Rekeweg, Sheriff of
Adams County
)UHGULF/DZUHQFH
1(/621 )5$1.(1-
%(5*(5
(DVWWK6WUHHW6XLWH
Indianapolis, IN 46280
$WWRUQH\IRU3ODLQWLII
The Sheriff's Department
does not warrant the accu-
racy of the street address
published herein.
Legal Notice
THE VEHICLES DE-
SCRIBED BELOW WILL
BE SOLD TO THE HIGH-
EST BIDDER AT PUBLIC
AUCTION TO SATISFY A
MECHINICS LIEN. SALE
WILL BE CONDUCTED AT
10:00 AM ON AUGUST 2,
2013 AT 1027 WASHING-
TON ST., DECATUR, IN.
2007 CHEVROLET VIN:
1GBKG31U671206929
OWED: $10,250.00
2007 FREIGHTLINER VIN:
WDPPF445379340736
OWED: $10,250.00
2007 FREIGHTLINER VIN:
WDPPF445379340740
OWED: $10, 250.00
SELLER RESERVES THE
RIGHT TO BID
Legal Notice
Alot of home for
the money!! Hard-
wood floors thru
out, Newly remod-
eled kitchen and
baths, 4 bedrooms,
2 Full baths, Gas
F/A, C/A, Newer
windows, Vinyl pri-
vacy fence, and
Double lot. Call to-
day for additional
details!
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell:
260-223-3534
Office:
260-724-9131
Real Estate
Country Living in
the City! You’re
looking at a spa-
cious 5 bedroom
home that includes
over 3,600.00
square foot, a
mother-in-law suite,
a finished club-
house/apartment
outbuilding,swim-
ming pool, stocked
pond, all on over
3.5 acres of
wooded lot. Ideal
Realtors Jason
Kreigh Sales Asso-
ciate
Cell 413-1446.
Exceptionally nice
home in a great
neighborhood! 3
bedrooms, 1 1/2
baths, beautiful oak
cabinets, crown
molding in the liv-
ing and dining
rooms, walk in pan-
try, heat pump.
Roof is less than 1
year old, new
seamless gutters.
Huge backyard!
Call today to set up
your showing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S. 13th St. De-
catur
260-724-9131
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email laceycaf-
fee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell 260-223-3534
Office
260-724-9131
•Like new condi-
tion
•3 Bedrooms
•2 Full Baths
•Appliances in-
cluded: Range, Re-
frigerator, Dish-
washer, Disposal,
Washer, Dryer
Ideal Suburban
Homes 260-341-8550
Al’s Cell Phone 260-
341-8557 Ev-elyn’s
Cell Phone
Mini farm! Country
property west of
Decatur. Features:
3 nice sized bed-
rooms, 2 full baths,
updated kitchen
with lots of cabinet
storage & counter-
top space and tile
floors. Hardwood
floors throughout
rest. Heated tile in
the bathroom on
the main level.
Built-in locker area
in the mud room,
gas F/A furnace
and C/A. and 2 car
detached garage.
Large barn with
several horse stalls
and storage. Nice
pasture area. 2
other outbuildings
for lots of uses.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.com
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell: 260-223-3534
Office:260-724-9131
SPACIOUS NEW
VILLA IN VILLAS
AT COUNTRY
MEADOWS
•1,763 square feet
of living space
•3 bedrooms, 3 full
baths
•Huge Bonus room
with full bath and
closet can be used
as family room,
master suite, or
guest bedroom
•Amish built cus-
tom hickory cabi-
nets with crown
molding and cabi-
net hardware
•Stainless steel ap-
pliances
•Lawn care and
snow removal $55
per month mainte-
nance fee
Ideal Suburban
Homes
260-341-8557 Ev-
elyn’s Cell Phone
This home fea-
tures 3 Bedrooms 2
Full Bathrooms,
boasts over 1300
sq ft, vaulted ceil-
ing in the Great
Room, Spacious
Master Bedroom
with Walk in Closet
and Full Bath, Gas
F/A, C/A. The seller
has recently added
Beautiful Wood
Laminate Flooring
thru out the house,
fenced backyard
with 8 X 12 Shed.
Call today to
schedule your pri-
vate showing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.com
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell: 260-223-3534
Office:260-724-9131
This home fea-
tures 3 Bedrooms 2
Full Bathrooms,
boasts over 1300
sq ft, vaulted ceil-
ing in the Great
Room, Spacious
Master Bedroom
with Walk in Closet
and Full Bath, Gas
F/A, C/A. The seller
has recently added
Beautiful Wood
Laminate Flooring
thru out the house,
fenced backyard
with 8 X 12 Shed.
Call today to
schedule your pri-
vate showing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.com
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell: 260-223-3534
Office:260-724-9131
This home is lo-
cated in a nice
quiet subdivision
north of Decatur.
This home boasts
over 2,400 finished
square feet and in-
cludes 3 bedrooms
and 2 1/2 baths.
Additional features
include: partially
finished basement
with mini bar, large
yard, covered
patio, fireplace,
great landscaping,
eat-in kitchen with
Corian countertops.
Master bedroom in-
cludes walk in
closet and full bath.
2 car attached ga-
rage, new siding,
new heat and air
system (heat
pump) in 2011. Ap-
pliances stay with
the home.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.com
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell: 260-223-3534
Office:260-724-9131
This truly is a "just
move in" home.
Features include:
new landscaping,
concrete drive,
freshly painted ex-
terior, 2 car garage
with opener, over-
sized lot, com-
pletely remodeled
kitchen, updated
bath, new carpet,
fresh interior paint,
spacious base-
ment.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL: (260)724-
9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee Check
out my website
www.laceycaffee.com
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell: 260-223-3534
Office: 260-724-9131
USDA 100% GOV-
ERNMENT
LOANS--Not just
for 1st time buyers!
All credit consid-
ered! Low rates!
Buy any home any-
where for sale by
owner or realtor.
Academy Mortgage
Corporation, 11119
Lima Road, Fort
Wayne, IN 46818.
Call Nick at
260-494-1111.
NLMS146802.
Some restrictions
may apply. Equal
Housing Lender.
Se Habla Espanol.
(A)
Very nice Indiana
limestone ranch
home located in
Stratton Addition.
New
windows, remod-
eled kitchen and
bathroom, newer
roof, furnace in
2010, and new wa-
ter heater in 2011.
Owners are very
aggressive on sell-
ing.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.com
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell: 260-223-3534
Office: 260-724-9131
Very well main-
tained home in a
nice quiet subdivi-
sion, close to
schools. Updates
include: new
kitchen counter top,
laminate floors in
the kitchen, Span-
ish lace, and more.
Huge master bed-
room with double
closets!
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.c
om
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell:
260-223-3534
Office:
260-724-9131
Villa living at its
best. This Quiet
Subdivision along
side the Golf
Course has so
much to offer.
Home Features:
Open Floor Plan,
Vaulted Ceiling in
the living room,
Nice size Master
Bedroom with Walk
in closet and Full
Bath, 2 Car At-
tached Garage,
and much more.
Home Owner is of-
fering to Pay 1
Years worth of
Maintenance dues
with a full price of-
fer!
Mini farm! Country
property west of
Decatur. Features:
3 nice sized bed-
rooms, 2 full baths,
updated kitchen
with lots of cabinet
storage & counter-
top space and tile
floors. Hardwood
floors throughout
rest. Heated tile in
the bathroom on
the main level.
Built-in locker area
in the mud room,
gas F/A furnace
and C/A. and 2 car
detached garage.
Large barn with
several horse stalls
and storage. Nice
pasture area. 2
other outbuildings
for lots of uses.
Ideal Realtors
522 S 13th St
Decatur
LOCAL:
(260)724-9131
TOLL FREE:
1-800-589-4332
Lacey Caffee
Check out my
website
www.laceycaffee.com
Email
laceycaffee@ideal-
builders.com
Cell: 260-223-3534
Office: 260-724-9131
Brand NEW in
plastic! QUEEN
PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET.
Can deliver, $125.
(260) 493-0805
1 & ONLY PLACE
TO CALL-- to get
rid of that junk car,
truck or van! Cash
on the spot! Free
towing. Call
260-745-888. (A)
Misc.
To Advertise
Call Today
724-2121
CHECK
OUT
ALL OF THE
HUGE
SAVINGS
IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS
One
EXPLOSIVE
Deal
Get
Two Months
of the
DECATUR DAILY
DEMOCRAT
$
14
HURRY!
Limited Time Offer!
Expires: August 5, 2013
Savings of up to
$
16!
~ Off the newstand price ~
NEW SUBSCRIBERS ONLY!
(must be Expired 30 days to be new)
Does Not Include Mailed Subscriptions!
Sign Me Up For This Explosive Deal!
MASTERCARD VISA DISCOVER
D
E
C
A
T
U
R
D
A
I
L
Y
D
E
M
O
C
R
A
T
I have enclosed my payment of
$
14
Send To:
141 S. 2nd St., Decatur, IN 46733
VYJHSS[OLVMÄJL H[260.724.2121 with your:
NAME: __________________________
ADDRESS:________________________
_________________________________
PHONE:_________________________
MOW DOWN SAVINGS
Advertise In
The Decatur Daily Democrat
Classifieds!
Call Today!!
724-2121
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
REALTOR STORAGE
CONSTRUCTION
HEATING & COOLING
GUTTERS
DRILLING
PLUMBING
GRAIN ELEVATOR
PRODUCE
WILLOW CREEK Store
SI60 W +00 SOUTH · BLRNL, !N
260-334-5080
FRESH SOUTH CAROLINA
FRESTONE PEACHES
GOOD FOR
Canning & Freezing
BULK lOODS
MLATS
CHLLSL
Now Available At...
CONSTRUCTION
E X T R E M E
BUILDERS
32/(%$516‡*$5$*(6
522),1*‡6,',1*
&21&5(7(‡$'',7,216
& MORE
FREE ESTIMATES
(260)
223-3713
PAINTING
CONSTRUCTION
AUTO REPAIR
CONSTRUCTION
CARPET CLEANING
You Can Run Your
ad in this space
for ONLY
$
2.96 per issue.
Contact The Decatur
Daily Democrat
at 260-724-2121
to find out how.
RENT ME
CONCRETE REPAIR
BAKER’S TRI-STATE
CONCRETE LIFTING
260-301-1269
“WE RAISE
SETTLED
CONCRETE”
www.bakerstristateconcrete.com
PORCHES, PATIOS, DRIVEWAYS,
FLOORS, STEPS & SIDEWALKS
You Can Run Your
ad in this space
for ONLY
$
2.96 per issue.
Contact The Decatur
Daily Democrat
at 260-724-2121
to find out how.
RENT ME
You Can Run Your
ad in this space
for ONLY
$
2.96 per issue.
Contact The Decatur
Daily Democrat
at 260-724-2121
to find out how.
RENT ME
NAPA Auto Parts
Announcing New Hours!
Weekdays
7:30am - 7:00gm
Saturday
8:00am - 4:00gm
Sunday
11:00am - 2:00gm
Your OnIy LocaIIy Owned
Auto Parts Store
207 N. 3rd St. · Decatur · 724-3129
AUTO PARTS
Tuesday July 23rd @ 5pm
1715 Patterson St.
Yes Its Sold-Dealer Sale
Public Welcome
We Sell In Case Quantities
Tom Nowak Auctioneer AU19800035
Thursday July 25th @ 6pm
Genevieve Beverly
20811 Dawkins Rd. Woodburn, IN
Real Estate
Jerry Ehle
Schrader Real Estate & Auction Co.
1-800-451-2709
www.schraderauction.com
Friday July 26th @ 6pm
1715 Patterson St.
Yes Its Sold-Public Auction
General Merchandise & New Items
WE DO TAKE CONSIGNMENTS
Tom Nowak Auctioneer AU19800035
Saturday, July 27th @ 9am
7588 North 300 West Decatur, IN
John Deere Tractor, Zero Turn Lawn Tractor, Antiques/Collectibles,
Contemporary Furniture, Appliances, Treadmill, Tools, Lawn/Garden,
Hickory Tongue & Groove Flooring, Firewood
Equipment Sells @ 10:00 am
Equipment Has Been Well Maintained.
Ron and Carol Selking, Owners
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Thursday, August 1, 2013 @ 6:00pm
Kathleen Ann Mangine Estate
Auction to be held at the property on
100 W. just off US 27, just North of
intersection 900 N and US 27.
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday August 1st @ 6pm
Kathleen Ann Mangine Estate
Auction to be held at the property on 100 W just off US 27, just
North of intersection 900 N & US27
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday, August 1st @ 6:00pm
Karen Secaur-Owner
130 Wheat Ridge Ct., Decatur
North of Decatur on Monmouth Rd. to Piqua Rd.-turn left, con-
tinue to Honeysuckle Ln.-turn left, go to end of road, turn left on
Wheat Ridge Ct.
Household Items, Power Tools, Fishing Equipment, Lawn & Garden
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Friday, August 2, 2013 @ 5:00pm
Immanuel Lutheran Church
8538 N 500 E Decatur, In
Benefit Auction
Accepting new or good used donated items
Thursday Aug. 1st 9:00am-6:00pm and
Friday Aug. 2nd 9:00am-3:00pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
town-countryauctions.com
Friday, August 2, 2013 @ 5:00pm
Immanuel Lutheran Church
8538 N 500 E Decatur, In
Benefit Auction
Accepting new or good used donated items
Thursday Aug. 1st 9:00am-6:00pm and
Friday Aug. 2nd 9:00am-3:00pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
town-countryauctions.com
August 3, 2013 @ 10:00am (personal property) 11:00am
(real estate)
Heirs of The William C. Poulson Estate, David Brewer, Attorney
Bluffton National Guard, 500 E. Spring St., Bluffton, IN
Real Estate: 263.20 acres+/- of prime agricultural farmland.
Tract# 1: 98.96 Acres +/- Sect. 22 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 2: 71.47 Acres +/- Sect. 27 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 3: 40.77 Acres +/- Sect. 18 Harrison Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 4: 52.00 Acres +/- Sect. 10 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 5: Tracts #1 - #2 - #3 & #4 (As An Entirety)
Car-2011 Toyota Camry, Tractors-WD-45 & D17 A.C., Lund fishing boat w/
60hp Johnson & other items, Truck-1979 GMC pickup
Ellenberger Brothers
Saturday August 3rd
Personal Property 9am Real Estate 12 noon
Open House Monday July 22nd (5-6pm)
Tony & Lynn Fuentes
2646 E 450 S Berne, IN
Real Estate- Tract 1- 2646 E 450 S 3400 sqft home has 5 bedrooms,
2 car garage on 12+/- acres w/ 1/2 acre pond & much, much more
Tract 2- 2656 E 450 S 1900 sqft ranch w/ 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car
attached garage on 5+/- acres w/ pole barn, FarmEquipment, Tools
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Tuesday August 6th @ 5:30pm
Reginald Myers Estate
Lu Ann Garton, Personal Representative
265 Center St., Berne, IN
Real Estate- 2 bedroom home
Personal Property, Furniture, Glassware & Collectibles
Miz Lehman Realtors & Auctioneers
www.mizlehman.com
Tuesday August 6, 2013 @ 6:00pm Judy Hawkins Estate
3320 N Salem Road, Decatur, IN
From intersection US 27 & US 33, go East on US 33 to Salem
Road, turn South Approximately 1 mile, watch for signs
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday August 8, @ 6:00pm
Auction conducted at Hoagland Hayloft
15112 Brunson Road, Hoagland, IN
LAND AUCTION
3 Farms 94.07 Acres 5 Tracts
Farm One 18.02 Tillable Acres
Morton Road, Ossian, IN
Marion Township•Section 33•Allen County•3 Tracts
Note: Potential Building Sites
Only Minutes from Decatur & Ft. Wayne
Farm Two 51.47 Tillable Acres
Hoagland Road, Hoagland, IN
Marion Township•Section 24•Allen County 1 Tract
Farm Three 24.58 Acres
Winchester Road, Decatur, IN
Root Township•Section 28•Adams County•1 Tract
20+/- Tillable Acres + 4.58 Acres Hunting/Recreation
CKB Farms, LLC, Owners
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Friday August 9, 2013 @ 4:00pm
E & M Blacksmith Shop Consignment
2404 W 350 S
2 1/2 miles North of Berne to Road 350 S. Then West 1 1/2 miles
Shop Equipment, Farm Machinery, Lawn & Garden, New handmade
Amish furniture, horses, buggies, carts, etc.
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Real Estate & Personal Property Auction
Saturday, August 10 @ 9am RE @ 11am
604 Homestead Ave, Ossian, IN
Rose Ann Heights Addition
Property Backs up to Maplecrest Park
3BR 2BA Ranch-LR W/ FP, kitchen w/ center island, Formal
Dining Rm, Concrete Patio, 3 Season Rm, Finished 2 car Att.
Gar; 1530sqft
2002 Buick Lesabre, 1986 Buick Park Avenue, Husgvarna Model
2554 Lawn Tractor, Collectibles, Furn & Household, Appliances,
Lawn/Garden, Exercise Equip, Tools
Henry Miller Spinet Piano & Bench
Calvin J. & Lois A. Smith, Owners
Kevin Smith Power of Attorney
Cindy Waldman Power of Attorney
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
WiegmannAuctioneers.com
Saturday, August 10th @ 10am
Mark and Sandra Freadenberg
5640 E 1000N
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: Home and nearly 2 acres
Personal Property is selling online @ littlejohnauctions.com
Tom Bauermeister for Littlejohnauctions Inc.
Tuesday August 13th @ 6pm
Will Morrison, Julie Adkins, & Dan Luebke - Owners
Section 21 St. Mary’s Township
34+/- acres of woods
16+/- acres of tillable ground
50+/- acres
Farm Land
Krueckeberg Auciton & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Thursday August 15th @ 6:00pm
Wilma Jean Liby
1221 N. 2nd St
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: 2 bedroom home w/ garage & full basement,
fenced yard
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
August 15th @ 4pm RE @ 6pm
Butcher
1062 Russel St
Located South of downtown Decatur on Winchester St to Russel
to auction site
Open House August 5th 5-6pm
Real Estate, Personal Property, Antiques, Piano, Appliances, Lawn &
Garden, Household Items, Furniture
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
August 17th @ 9am RE @ Noon
Zephyr
195 State Line Road, Convoy, OH
Located East of Decatur, On US 224, To state line, then North
approx. 9 miles to auction site.
Open House August 6th • 5-6pm
Real Estate, Personal Property, Appliances, Lawn & Garden,
Household Item, Furniture
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
August 23rd @ 10am
Decatur Mini & Self Storage
Various Locations in Decatur, IN
Personal Property
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
AUCTION CALENDAR
Classifieds
Page 6B • Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Decatur Daily Democrat
Find What You Need In
7KH'HFDWXU'DLO\'HPRFUDW&ODVVLÀHGV
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
SUDOKU ® by American Profile
LEO (July
23-Aug. 22) -- Although
you usually fare better
when you have lots of
time to ponder a deci-
sion, a snap judgment
will turn out quite well today. Don’t
second-guess yourself.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- You are in a brief, favorable cycle
where your financial affairs are con-
cerned. Be alert and ready to move
quickly should an unexpected,
potentially profitable development
come your way.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- You might be more inclined to
think about pleasure than work.
Fortunately, you should be able to
enjoy yourself without it interfering
with or distracting you from your
job.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- A number of little things that
you failed to finish will demand some
attention. However, you’ll enjoy
sweeping the deck clean. Sometimes,
it’s nice to have a clean slate.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- Something quite fortu-
itous could develop through a friend
you run into by chance. You and this
person have always been able to
help each other quite well.
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19) -- Although you’re usu-
ally exceptionally lucky where your
material interests are concerned,
you’re not always necessarily so in
other areas. So, keep your mind on
making money, and don’t worry
about other things, today.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Don’t be reluctant to discard
any old, unworkable methods in
favor of newer and better proce-
dures. This might be one of those
days when it pays to switch horses
in midstream.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Someone you treated very
considerately in the past has been
very eager to repay you, and today
might bring that chance. Accept this
person’s attempt at reciprocation
with a glad heart and open arms.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- It would behoove you to social-
ize with some progressive thinkers
today. You’ll easily recognize clever
ideas when you hear them, and
you’ll know exactly how to put them
to use.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- Be on the lookout for some
innovative ideas, especially some
that may apply to an area that has
been causing you concern. Make
your move quickly, however; time
may not be your ally.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- A person of foreign heritage or one
born in a distant place is likely to
play a constructive role in your
affairs. Be alert, so you can take full
advantage of this person’s help.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- This could be an exciting day,
especially regarding a joint endeavor
of some kind. An extraordinary hap-
pening might develop that you’ll want
to be a part of.
Astro-Graph
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Puzzle #2852-M
Medium
1 2 3
2 4 5 6
7 6 8 2
3 6 2 1
2 7
8 9 2 3
2 9 8 7
5 1 3 4
6 7 3
Decatur Daily Democrat Tuesday, July 23, 2013 • Page 7B
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Solution #2851-M
5 1 8 9 2 3 6 7 4
3 9 2 6 7 4 5 1 8
4 6 7 5 1 8 9 3 2
9 5 6 8 4 7 3 2 1
7 3 4 2 5 1 8 6 9
2 8 1 3 9 6 4 5 7
6 4 3 1 8 2 7 9 5
1 7 5 4 3 9 2 8 6
8 2 9 7 6 5 1 4 3
Beetle Bailey ® Mort Walker
THE FAMILY CIRCUS ®
by Bil Keane
THE LOCKHORNS ®
by Bunny Hoest and John Reiner
ZITS ® by Jerry Scott and Jim Burgman
THE BORN LOSER ® by Art and Chip Sansom
Blondie ® Dean Young & John Marshall
ARLO & JANIS ® by Jimmy Johnson
FRANK & ERNEST ® by Bob Thaves
BIG NATE ® by Lincoln Peirce
CRANKSHAFT ® by Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers
BABY BLUES ® by Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
THE GRIZZWELLS ® by Bill Schorr
RECYCLE
PLEASE
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 8B • Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Purchase your copy
RETURN ORDER BLANK TO PURCHASE YOUR COPY
This keepsake book is printed on 70# paper and perfect bound with an attractive soft laminated cover,
making it a high quality book. Fill out the form for the books you wish to order.
MAIL TO:
Please enter my order for:
copy(s) HISTORIC POSTCARDS @ $24.99 + $1.75 tax = $26.74
Please ship my book(s)
to the address at right.
I have enclosed an
additional $6.50 for each
book to be shipped.
T
I am enclosing
payment in full.
T
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP
PHONE
A
p
e
r
f
e
c
t
g
i
f
t
i
d
e
a
!
Order your copy today!
Books now
in stock!
Historic Postcards from
The Decatur Daily Democrat with the
assistance of Max Miller has compiled a
96-page book containing historic
Adams County Post Cards.
The postcards depict people, buildings,
streetscapes & more from the 1890s to the
near present-all about Adams County!
1
HISTORIC POSTCARDS FROM
ADAMS COUNTY, INDIANA
$
24
99
plus tax
YOU WILL WANT A COPY - NOT ONLY FOR YOURSELF - BUT
FOR YOUR LOVED ONES AS WELL. WHAT A GREAT GIFT
IDEA FOR THOSE WHO CALL ADAMS COUNTY HOME!
LIMITED SUPPLY OF BOOKS FOR PURCHASE
NOW AVAILABLE AT THE DECATUR DAILY DEMOCRAT
HISTORIC POSTCARDS FROM ADAMS COUNTY, INDIANA
Make Checks Payable to: The Decatur Daily Democrat
141 S. Second St., Decatur, IN 46733
260-724-2121 • www.decaturdailydemocrat.com
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
Questions Call 260-724-2121
Stop by our
office and
get yours!
1
H
E
R
E
N
O
W
Year after Olympics, Brits bask in sports success
By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer
LONDON (AP) — A
year after Britain’s gold-
en Olympic summer, the
country is basking in yet
another run of global
sports success.
Whether it’s cycling,
tennis, golf, rugby or
cricket, athletes and
teams from Britain or
England have made this
another summer to savor
— just as the nation pre-
pares to mark the anni-
versary of the London
Games this week.
‘‘There’ll never be
another summer of sport
like 2012, but 2013 is
having a damn good try,’’
The Times of London said
Monday in a wraparound
supplement heralding
Britain’s latest triumph
— Chris Froome’s win in
the Tour de France.
The sports surge
started a year ago when
Bradley Wiggins became
the first British rider to
win the Tour.
Then came the London
Games, where the host
nation raked in 29 gold
medals and 65 overall
to finish third in the
standings and piled up
another 120 medals at
the Paralympics.
With British sports
seeming to feed off the
momentum of 2012, the
last few months have
brought a flurry of new
achievements:
—Justin Rose became
the first English golfer to
win the U.S. Open since
Tony Jacklin in 1970.
—Andy Murray won
Wimbledon, finally end-
ing Britain’s quest for
its first men’s champion
at the All England Club
since Fred Perry in 1936.
Murray also won the U.S.
Open in September.
—The British & Irish
Lions won their first
rugby test series against
Australia in 16 years.
—England has won
the first two tests of
the Ashes cricket series
against Australia.
‘‘The run of British
success at sport did not
begin at the Olympic
Games, but it certainly
hasn’t ended there,’’ The
Times said. ‘‘The knock-
on effect of those games
keeps on knocking on.’’
Sunday had offered
British fans the tanta-
lizing possibility of an
improbable trifecta: vic-
tories in the Tour de
France, the Ashes test
and the British Open golf
championship. It was
close, but not to be.
Froome crossed
the finish line on the
Champs-Elysees in Paris
with the yellow jersey
as Britain’s second con-
secutive Tour de France
champion. England
crushed Australia by 347
runs at Lord’s to take a
2-0 lead in the five-test
series. But England’s Lee
Westwood, who started
the final round of the
British Open at Muirfield
with a two-shot lead,
couldn’t hold up his end
of the bargain. He faded
down the stretch as Phil
Mickelson claimed the
claret jug.
winners. Just look at
what has happened this
summer.’’
The challenge, he said,
is to keep the success
going.
‘‘We have to get out
of the mindset that we
are forever grabbing vic-
tories out of the jaws
of defeat,’’ Coe said in
The Independent on
Sunday. ‘‘We are not any
more. So we must lose
this habit of thinking,
‘Oh, my god, we’ve wait-
ed 77 years for Murray
to win Wimbledon and
we’ll have to wait another
77 years for another to
come along.’ It would be
a national disaster if we
wait another 10 years to
get another player in the
top 10.’’
One of the keys to
Britain’s upsurge has
been money. Funding
from the national lottery
has poured tens of mil-
lions of dollars into elite
sports programs.
Sports science has also
played a part. Cycling,
in particular, has used
high-tech training meth-
ods to turn Britain into
a power on the track and
on the road.
‘‘If you have ... four
things — the talented
athletes, the coaches, the
structure, and the money
— you have a very much
better chance of success,’’
British Sports Minister
Hugh Robertson told Sky
TV in Paris, where he
attended the finish of the
Tour de France.
The burst of pride
comes before a series
of events marking the
Olympic anniversary. A
Diamond League track
and field meet — featuring
the return of Jamaican
sprinter Usain Bolt and
British gold medalists
Mo Farah and Jessica
Ennis — will be held at
the Olympic Stadium on
Friday and Saturday, the
first competition at the
flagship venue since the
games.
Britain hopes to recre-
ate some of the magic of
a year ago, but is deter-
mined to make sure the
much talked about ‘‘leg-
acy’’ is not short lived.
‘‘You can’t make a
snap judgment on the
27th of July this year,’’
Robertson said.
‘‘It’s going to be a
three-, a five- or possibly
a 10-year judgment. The
building blocks are very
good. I would never for a
moment pretend that it
is a job done or even half
done. There’s an awful
lot of work to do.’’
O v e r s h a d o w i n g
the sporting euphoria
Monday was news that
Kate, the wife of Prince
William, had gone into
labor. But the bookies
could even find a sports
angle in the royal baby
stakes.
‘‘As for our future king
or queen, it’s a 5,000-
1 shot they play profes-
sional football, cricket
or rugby for England,’’
Ladbrokes said. ‘‘It’s only
100-1 that the heir to
the throne participates
for Britain at any future
Olympic Games.’’
‘‘Two out of three ain’t
bad,’’ said Monday’s head-
line in The Independent.
‘‘A tour de force for
British sport.’’
British bookmak-
ers are jumping on the
bandwagon: Ladbrokes
offers odds of 50-1 that
England will sweep the
Ashes series 5-0, Murray
will successfully defend
his U.S. Open title and a
British golfer will win the
PGA Championship.
It hasn’t all been
rosy, though, particular-
ly in England’s favorite
sport of soccer. England
was humiliated at the
Under-21 European
Championship in Israel,
failing to win a single
game.
The national women’s
team fared no better,
eliminated from the
European Championship
without a win and losing
3-0 to France in its final
group match.
The England men’s
team lies second behind
Montenegro in its qualify-
ing group for next year’s
World Cup in Brazil.
While England is likely
to qualify, it is not con-
sidered a top contender
for a title it has won only
once — at home in 1966.
And if there is one cham-
pionship that England
covets above all others, it
is the World Cup.
Yet, overall, there is a
sense that Britain is fly-
ing high and the image of
the lovable loser is over.
‘‘There is now a great-
er confidence in British
sport,’’ said Sebastian
Coe, the former middle-
distance champion who
led London’s Olympic
organizing committee.
‘‘Team GB showed other
sports that Brits can be
Chris Froome
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
0723.pdf12.64 MB
View more articles in:
    Tonight's final Northeast Hoosier Conference baseball game will go a long...
    FORT WAYNE— The Braves used a big homerun late in the game from Brett...
    MONROE— South Adams baseball came out on the right end of the conference...

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes