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August 1, 2013

August 1, 2013

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County Road 100N
has been reopened to
traffic between C.R.
400W and C.R. 500W, it
was announced by Tim
Barkey, Adams County
Highway Engineer Tim
Barkey.
Fleming Excavating
of Decatur, recently
replaced a small struc-
ture at the Hoffman
Tile, forcing a tempo-
rary closing of a section
of the road while work
was being done.
This year’s Swiss
Days event marked the
end of the two-year ten-
ure of Berne Chamber
of Commerce Executive
Director Sheree
Barkley, who stepped
down at the conclusion
of the festival to pursue
other interests.
Chamber President
Mark Settlemyre said
he hopes to sched-
ule a meeting of the
chamber’s executive
board to fill the posi-
tion sometime next
week. Settlemyre said
the board had received
resumes “from some
good candi-
dates” to
take over
the direc-
tor’s duties.
T h e
c h a mb e r
pr e s i de nt
said he was sorry to
see Barkley leave.
“Sheree did an excel-
lent job for us, and I’m
sad to see her go. She
was a good face for the
city of Berne, but she
had the opportunity to
work out of her home
and spend more time
with her young daugh-
ter, and I respect that.”
Find What You Need In
The Decatur Daily Democrat Classifieds
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
The Decatur Daily
Democrat
75¢ at newstands
Inside
Page 8B
Remembering
the good times of
Swiss Days 2013
An independent newspaper serving Adams County, Indiana since 1857 August 1, 2013 THURSDAY
IN BRIEF
Closed part of
CR 100N opens
Chamber at
Berne seeks
new director
Contact Us
By phone: 724-2121
By Fax: 724-7981
On The Web
www.decaturdaily
democrat.com
On this date
In 2007, the eight-
lane Interstate 35W
bridge, a major
Minneapolis artery,
collapsed into the
Mississippi River dur-
ing evening rush hour,
killing 13 people.
Transition year for State Fair
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Visitors
to this year’s Indiana State Fair
won’t get big-name concerts or
watch events in the popular
Pepsi Coliseum. But organizers
say the nation’s sixth-oldest fair
still has a lot of life in it.
The fair opens Friday for its
17-day run. Executive Director
Cindy Hoye says it’s a ‘‘unique
year’’ without the concerts and
coliseum events visitors have
come to expect.
The concerts were bypassed
this year until a $53 million
upgrade of the coliseum is com-
plete. Concerts were moved off
site last year following 2011’s
deadly stage collapse before
a concert by country duo
Sugarland.
Hoye says visitors will have
plenty of new things to explore.
New features include a glass
barn to teach visitors about
modern farming, a Youth Arena
and a midway geared toward
smaller children.
The $10 million Youth Arena
devoted to 4-H and other youth
events will open on Friday.
The 30,000-square-foot
arena will debut as the site of
4-H Horse & Pony classes and
events. The fairgrounds’ newest
building will also host livestock
shows, draft horse competitions
and other events during the
fair’s 17-day run.
The building will be officially
dedicated during the fair on
Aug. 10.
The Youth Arena has a tint-
ed glass and Indiana limestone
exterior. Its inside boasts an
arena floor with easy access
for both people and livestock.
Fair officials say the building’s
floor is comparable to
that of the Fairgrounds’
Coliseum, which is in the
midst of a $53 million
renovation.
Popcorn has
deep roots
in Indiana
By ROSA SALTER
RODRIGUEZ
The Journal Gazette
ANGOLA, Ind. (AP) —
When Carrie Vollmer-
Sanders of Angola saw
green popcorn seeds in a
gardening catalog a few
years ago, she knew she
had to have some.
After all, both she
and her farmer husband
Ryan Sanders graduat-
ed from Michigan State
University. What could be
a more appropriate snack
for Spartan sporting
events than green pop-
corn mixed with white?
‘‘If there’s such a thing
as a popcorn snob, I’ve
become one,’’ she told
The Fort Wayne Journal
Gazette.
Green popcorn? Yes,
there is such a thing.
There’s also blue pop-
corn and red popcorn and
sunburst popcorn, which
has yellow and red stripes
on the outside. And while
you’re digesting that ker-
nel of information, here’s
another - Hoosierdom is
the second-largest pop-
corn-producing state in
the nation.
Yes, popcorn has
deep roots hereabouts.
Orville Redenbacher was
a Hoosier, after all. And
isn’t Pop Weaver, based
in Noblesville and with a
plant in Van Buren, the
largest seller of popcorn
worldwide?
There’s even a brand of
gourmet popcorn named
Popcorn, Indiana - though
that company happens to
be based in Englewood,
N.J. A company spokes-
woman explains that the
brand is named for an
actual town in southern
Indiana and had former
Indiana University bas-
ketball star Isiah Thomas
as not only a customer
but a major investor.
This year’s Indiana
State Fair, open from Aug.
2 to 18, has christened
its 2013 edition The Year
of Popcorn, in honor of
the ‘‘agricultural and eco-
nomic importance’’ of the
more than 220 million
pounds of popcorn pro-
duced here annually.
That’s according to
Andy Klotz, fair spokes-
man — and someone who
can feed you enough facts
about popcorn to make a
full meal.
Did you know that
popcorn is actually a
separate variety of corn
from plain old field corn
(the kind that goes into
animal feed and ethanol)
and sweet corn (the kind
folks hanker for at this
time of year)?
A major distributor
of popcorn is based in
Adams County: Amish
Country Popcorn, owned
and operated by Brian
Lehman.
Situated on County
Road 150 East, just east
of Berne, Amish Country
Popcorn has been in
business since 1978
and ships its products
throughout the United
States.
Its website says the
company has a wide vari-
ety of gourmet popcorn,
including red, purple,
and ladyfinger, as well
as an assortment of pop-
corn kernel sizes, ranging
from small to extra large.
In addition, the company
sells poppers, gift sets,
seasonings, and gift cer-
tificates
According to the web-
site, in 1965 Roy Lehman
planted a small plot of
popcorn for
his six-year
-old son,
Brian, who
then began
s uppl y i ng
his fam-
ily with pop-
corn. The
boy started
c a r r y i n g
popcorn to school to sell,
and when he finished
high school, he wanted to
stay on the family farm.
His dad suggested he go
from planting an acre of
popcorn to planting 25
acres — and that is how
it all started, according to
information on the web-
site.
At the age of 19,
Brian named his product
“Amish Country Popcorn”
because he thought it
would fit the area he lived
in, it says on the web-
site.
Major
seller is
based in
county
Brian
Lehman
Did you know the
variety used to make
movie theater and ball-
park popcorn is different
from that used for cara-
mel corn? The former is
(Continued on page 3A)
LOW 5s ... Sadie Burkhead, 6, was getting low 5s as she was congratulated by
all 60 volunteers for her first-place effort in last weekend’s Iron Kid Triathlon at
Bellmont High School. The seventh annual Decatur-Adams County Parks and
Recreation triathlon was held after a one-hour delay due to rain. Further infor-
mation on page 1B. (Photo provided)
Barkley
Man on run hits deputy’s
vehicle, winds up in jail
Eric P. Martin, 29-year-old Anderson
resident, was in custody at the Adams
County Jail this morning after being
arrested Wednesday afternoon in an
unusual incident.
Adams County Chief Deputy Sheriff
Eric Beer, off duty and in his pickup
truck, saw a man running from the
St. Vincent dePaul store on Village
Green Drive. As Beer drove around the
Baymont Inn to check on the man, a
car ran into the side of his vehicle.
The driver of the car jumped out,
help up his hands and said, “You got
me.” It was the same person Beer had
seen running, and the man allegedly
confessed to stealing the car he was
driving in Anderson.
Police recovered from the vehicle a
purse allegedly stolen from a car at
the St. Vincent dePaul store, as well as
some medications.
Beer contacted city police and
Detective Leonard Corral Jr. arrived at
the scene to take part in the investiga-
tion and arrest.
Damage to Beer’s pickup was report-
ed as minimal.
FORT WAYNE, Ind. (AP) — Gov. Mike
Pence said Wednesday he is standing
by Indiana’s system of assigning ‘‘A-
F’’ grades to schools based on their
performance despite reports that the
state’s former schools chief worked to
change the grading formula to ensure
a top GOP donor’s school received an
‘‘A.’’
Pence told The Journal Gazette on
Wednesday that the system is ‘‘an
essential part’’ of accountability mea-
sures designed to improve education in
Indiana. But he said the public must
have confidence that the system is ‘‘fair
and impartial.’’
‘‘I think the A-to-F system is extreme-
ly important,’’ Pence said after partici-
pating in a mile-long walk to promote
health with his wife, Karen. ‘‘Parents
have a right to know how their schools
are performing overall. But that system
needs to really reflect the performance
(Continued on page 3A)
Bleill to bring message
to Berne on August 28
Josh Bleill, the Indiana
native and former Marine
corporal who attracted a
packed Erekson Theater
audience in Decatur
earlier this year, will be
speaking in late August
at South Adams High
School.
An announcement
by Redeemer Lutheran
Church in Bryant said
he will speak at 7 p.m.
on Wednesday, August
28, at 7 p.m. in the high
school auditorium.
The program will be
free and open to the pub-
lic, although a free-will
donation will be collected,
with all proceeds going
to the Wounded Warrior
Project, the announce-
ment said.
In order to make the
event free, church offi-
cials said they are ask-
ing area churches, busi-
nesses and individuals to
make a monetary dona-
tion to cover the event
cost.
Checks should be made
payable to Redeemer
Lutheran Special Event
and mailed to: Redeemer
Lutheran Church Special
Event, PO Box 156,
Bryant, IN 47326.
Bleill, who lost both
his legs while serving in
Fallujah, is an author
and motivational speaker
and currently a commu-
nity spokesperson for the
Indianapolis Colts.
Josh Bleill
Pence stands by ‘A-F’ grades;
says public confidence needed
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 2A • Thursday, August 1, 2013
LocaL/State
5Lk0B PkINI I0P5
8 5£L£LI£ß B£kN£ I'5
Bug 1 0et 1 Fk££
Iake $5. 00 0ff
LAkKAkII 5K0kI5,
|£AN5 8 PANI5
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5tartlng at $5. 99 and up.
5£L£LI£ß W0kK B00I5
50º 0FF
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PAYßAY5 LA5K BALK
All Offers Good Thru Aug. 31, 2013
1480 Morningstar BIvd. · 260-728-4111 · Decatur, IN
North ot K-Mart
Hours: Mon-Fri 9-7 · Sat 9-6
PUBLIC AUCTION
SAT • AUG 17
TH
Personal Property @ 9am • Real Estate @ 12 Noon
1925 St. Line Road, Convoy, OH
(Located North of Dixon, IN on State Line Road)
Catherine I. Rozsal/Zephyr, Owner
KRUECKEBERG JIM SHAFFER REALTY
AUCTION & REALTY
11661 State Route 707, Mendon, OH 45862
1030 S. 13th St. Decatur, IN 46733
Call us at 1-419-795-5511 • Call us at 260-724-7402 or 1-877-592-8756
www.jimshafferrealty.com
www.kjauction.com
Josh Krueckeberg (AU19800008) • Licensed & Bonded in Indiana/Ohio
3 or 4 Bedroom, 1 ½ Story Home W/Full Bath, situated
on 3.2 Acres W/30’ x 60’ Pole Barn W/Workshop and a
2 Car Detached Garage
HOUSEHOLD – APPLIANCES – FURNITURE – TOOLS
GE Refrigerator – Electric Stove – GE Washer &
Electric Dryer – Small Chest Freezer – Misc. Electric
Kitchen Appliances – Sofa – Organ – 3 Pc Bedroom
Suite (Full-Chest-Dresser W/Mirror) – Cast Iron Trains –
Train Track – Lionel Tanker – Chest of Drawers – Lazy
Boy Chair – Lots of Misc. Boxes Left to Unpack – Misc.
Open House Tuesday, August 6th (5-6PM)
Terms and conditions: $5,000 nonrefundable down payment due at close of auc-
tion w/balance due upon delivery of deed and title policy. Buyer assumes taxes due
& payable July 2014 and thereafter. Possession of home will be at closing & farm
ground will be after harvest of 2013 crops.. There will be no survey provided. Home is
selling subject to confirmation of seller for cash, so have your financing in order and
be prepared to bid. Home is not being sold subject to inspections, so contact auction-
eers at (260) 724-7402 for your own inspections including lead-based paint.
Terms: Cash, or Good Check Not responsible for accidents
Auctioneers Note: Any statements made day of auction takes precedence over
any written or oral statements.
W
a
tc
h
fo
r
S
ig
n
s
Business Builders
Small square ads
appear regularly in the Democrat
for 1 LOW monthly charge.
Frequency Advertising to Build Your
Business Awareness
CALL 724-2121 FOR DETAILS.
Registration & Open House
Wed. August 7 - 3pm - 7pm
*Jazz *Tap *Ballet *Clogging *Acrobatics
* Hip-Hop * Poms * Musical Theater * Irish
*Creative Dance* Modern * Starlette Combo
* Mommy & Me * Boys Only Hip Hop
* Fitness: Yoga, ZUMBA & Sentao
114 N. 2nd Street 728-4DDA (4332)
Kelley McIver, Dírector
(Iormer Projessíonal Dancer wíth NCL Cruíse Línes)
Decatur Dance Academy
SEEKING HOME — This
approximately one-year-
old male Rottweiler is
now available for adop-
tion at the Adams County
Animal Shelter, 2168 S.
CR 300 E. For informa-
tion call 692-6819, or
visit Monday-Friday, 8-10
a.m. and 4-6 p.m. (Photo
provided)
BIKE WINNER — During this years 4-H Fair, the
Adams County Sheriff’s Reserves had a drawing
for a new girl’s bike and a new boy’s bike, with
helmets. The boys winner was Preston Contreras,
8, of Decatur. He is seen here with his mother,
Kaateline Contreras, and sisters Sarah Contreras
and Venah Handshoe-Aguia. With them is Deputy
Troy Habegger. (Photo provided)
New specialty
plate form is
online today
By RICK CALLAHAN
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS (AP)
— Indiana’s yearlong
moratorium on requests
for new specialty license
plates ends today when
the Bureau of Motor
Vehicles posts new appli-
cation forms online for
the state’s revamped
specialty plate program,
state officials told a legis-
lative panel Tuesday.
BMV general counsel
Elizabeth Murphy told
members of a fledgling
legislative committee that
will review those appli-
cations that applications
for specialty plates must
be submitted by April
1, 2014. The first new
specialty plates won’t
be issued until January
2015.
State lawmakers this
year overhauled Indiana’s
specialty license plate
system following a con-
troversy over plates
issued to the Indiana
Youth Group, a support
group for gay teenagers.
The state said the group
violated its contract by
issuing low-numbered
plates to donors and vol-
unteers and canceled the
plates, along with those
of two other groups, last
year.
The youth group sued
the BMV in June after the
agency declined to follow
an administrative judge’s
request that it reinstate
the group’s plate.
Indiana’s revised pro-
gram includes a require-
ment that all groups with
specialty plates sell at
least 500 plates a year.
Murphy gave the com-
mittee a list of about 90
of the state’s 103 spe-
cialty plates. More than a
dozen of the groups listed
had sold less than 200
plates through the first
six months of 2013.
Any group that doesn’t
sell at least 500 plates
by Dec. 31 will be placed
on probation, she said.
Groups that can’t sell at
least 500 plates in 2014
will have their plates
revoked.
Murphy said all
Indiana groups that have
had specialty license
plates for the past 10
years must submit new
applications for plates
by next April. Colleges
and veterans groups with
plates are exempt from
that requirement.
BMV Commissioner
Scott Waddell told the
committee that the new
plate program and the
panel’s advisory role
should aid nonprofit
groups and others enti-
ties seeking the plates.
‘‘Hopefully it will add
some clarification to the
process. I think it will
benefit everybody in the
long run,’’ he said.
Motorists pay an addi-
tional $40 for the special
plates, with $25 going
to the organization and
its cause and $15 to the
BMV.
Indiana’s new special-
ty plate law created the
eight-member specialty
plate committee, which
includes four Republican
and four Democratic law-
makers.
The panel will review
each application and
scrutinize the groups’
financial statements
before making recom-
mendations to the BMV
about whether it should
approve the request. The
BMV will have the final
say on each application.
Students aim to bring
clean water to Kenya
Brizzi says he expected
Charlie White’s suit
TERRE HAUTE, Ind.
(AP) — Students at Rose-
Hulman Institute of
Technology have devel-
oped a device designed to
use solar energy to purify
drinking water in Kenya.
The Tribune-Star
reports the device uses
solar energy to heat water
that has been filtered
through sand and pea
gravel to 158 degrees.
That kills bacteria.
Student project man-
ager Phillip Markison
says the device can puri-
fy 15 liters of water a
day and is designed for a
family of five.
The device is part of a
design-build-communi-
cate course focused on
the National Academy
of Engineering’s Grand
Challenges.
This challenge called
for students to put solar
energy to work economi-
cally.
Rose-Hulman stu-
dents plan to contact
their peers at Egerton
University in Kenya so
they can take the device
to their tribes.
Check out our
Classifeds
unspecified damages,
saying Brizzi’s ‘‘errors and
omissions have resulted
in permanent harm to
(White’s) reputation and
ability to secure employ-
ment.’’
Brizzi, who is also
a Republican, was the
elected prosecutor for
Marion County, which
includes Indianapolis,
and served from 2003
through 2010.
A former central
Indiana coroner whom
Brizzi represented in a
drunken driving case
also is suing him, say-
ing he provided incom-
petent counsel that kept
her from running for re-
election.
Former Hancock
County Coroner Tamara
Vangundy sued Brizzi
in May after her felony
official misconduct con-
viction barred her from
seeking elected office.
Brizzi also has faced
scrutiny for his per-
sonal and political ties
to Timothy Durham,
an Indianapolis busi-
nessman and major
Republican donor who
was convicted last year on
federal charges of swin-
dling about $200 million
from investors in Akron,
Ohio-based Fair Finance.
By TOM DAVIES
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Former Indiana Secretary
of State Charlie White
alleges in a lawsuit that
he was the victim of
legal malpractice by his
defense attorney leading
up to the voter fraud con-
viction that forced him
from office.
White’s lawsuit against
former Marion County
Prosecutor Carl Brizzi
contends that Brizzi
wasn’t adequately versed
in the complexities of
election, property and
residency laws at White’s
February 2012 trial.
Brizzi ‘‘rendered legal
services that fell below
the reasonable standard
of criminal defense attor-
neys because he was
ignorant of the law, crim-
inal trial procedure and
ignorant of the facts in
critical phases of (White’s)
case during the jury
trial,’’ White contends in
the lawsuit filed last week
in Marion County court.
A Hamilton County
jury convicted White on
voter fraud and other
charges after Brizzi did
not call any witnesses
and immediately rest-
ed the defense after the
prosecution wrapped up
its case.
White was sentenced
to one year of home
detention and was auto-
matically removed from
office.
Brizzi said he was
expecting the lawsuit
after White asked him
to sign an affidavit say-
ing the terminal illness
of Brizzi’s mother was a
distraction during trial.
Brizzi said she was in
and out of nursing homes
with cancer before her
May 2012 death.
‘‘He wanted me to say
that was a huge distrac-
tion. But I don’t think
that interfered with the
trial, so I didn’t sign it,’’
Brizzi said in a telephone
interview.
White, a Republican,
made similar claims
against Brizzi in March,
when his new attorney
asked a Hamilton County
judge to overturn the
convictions. An Aug. 15
hearing is scheduled on
that request.
The charges against
White stemmed from
him using his ex-wife’s
address in Fishers as
his voting address when
he was serving on the
Town Council of the
Indianapolis suburb and
running for secretary of
state in 2010.
His convictions on three
counts of voter fraud, two
counts of perjury and
one count of theft forced
him from office about 13
months after he became
the state’s top elections
official.
The lawsuit seeks
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 4A • Thursday, August 1, 2013 OpiniOn
The DecaTur Daily DemocraT
Ron Storey, Publisher
Bob Shraluka
Managing Editor
J Swygart
Opinion Page Editor
I&M official explains
tree-pruning policy
By MARC LABRIE
Many Midwesterners have a special appreciation
for our trees. Majestic tree canopies bring character
and beauty to our cities. For many, trees connect the
past with the present and often carry memories and
emotions.
Unfortunately, when not properly placed or pruned,
trees pose a significant threat to maintaining electric
power to your home and beyond. Thunderstorms
often offer reminders of what happens when trees
and power lines intersect.
Indiana Michigan Power strives to balance property
owners’ love of their trees with our vital mission of
providing safe and reliable electric power. That means
trimming or removing trees near our power lines.
To preserve both tree canopies and reliable deliv-
ery of power, we seek to trim or remove trees before
they pose a threat to power lines and poles.
This summer you may well see I&M crews or those
of our contractors in your neighborhood. The process
starts even before the work crews arrive – unless
there is an emergency, I&M informs affected property
owners in advance of any work to be performed.
We emphasize open communications with cus-
tomers, sending a letter to every property owner
along the appropriate lines — even if trees in their
yards are not affected. Our planners make multiple
attempts to meet with property owners to discuss the
work. If we haven’t been able to make contact with
a property owner, we follow up with cards placed on
doorknobs of homes.
Let’s be frank: Some residents are less than happy
about how much we reduce a tree canopy. We make
every effort to maintain the aesthetic appeal of the
trees while adhering to the accepted safety standards
of the American National Standards Institute as well
as OSHA:
For single distribution lines that go through cities
and down country roads, we maintain a minimum
10-foot clearance on each side of the power line.
Where three lines carry power, the standard is 15
feet. Sometimes, we trim fast-growing trees such as
the silver maple or the willow back farther, to keep
them from growing into the power line for the next
three to five years.
Trees in the public right-of-way – usually the
area between a street and sidewalk – are a different
matter, because those are generally under control of
the city or town. Residents of municipalities should
check with their parks or other appropriate depart-
ment with any questions about planting, removing or
trimming trees in the right-of-way.
If you are considering planting a tree, remember
that some trees that were once in favor — including
the Bradford pear and the ash — are now consid-
ered problem trees or worse. The National Arbor Day
Foundation offers guidance on planting appropriate
trees (see arborday.org and click on “Right Tree,
Right Place.”)
Residents within I&M’s service area with questions
about trees can call 800-311-4634 (in Michigan, 800-
311-6424.) And before planting a tree, always call the
811 Call Before You Dig line.
Labrie is Regional Forestry Supervisor for Indiana
Michigan Power.
Why governing is so difficult
By LEE H. HAMILton
If you want to know why passing
congressional legislation has gotten
so difficult, here are two numbers to
remember: 5 and 532. They illustrate a
great deal about Congress today.
When I served in the House decades
ago and the “farm bill” came up, stitch-
ing a successful piece of legislation
together depended on getting five orga-
nizations to find common ground. They
included groups like the national Farm
Bureau and the Farmers Union, and
our task was clear: get them to agree
on what the bill ought to look like, and
we had a measure that could pass.
This year, Congress is struggling to
get a farm bill through. After the House
of Representatives sent the first ver-
sion down to defeat, no fewer than 532
organizations signed a letter to Speaker
John Boehner asking him to bring a bill
back to the floor as soon as possible.
The array of groups was striking. The
Farm Bureau signed on, but so did
avocado growers and peach canners,
beekeepers and archers, conservation-
ists of all sorts, and huge businesses
like Agri-Mark.
In essence, the big umbrella groups
have broken into different constituent
interests, with peanut growers and
sheep ranchers and specialty-crop
growers all pursuing their particular
goals. Sometimes it feels like there’s a
constituency for every commodity —
and on such broader issues as biofuels,
rural development and international
trade. What used to require bringing
together a handful of constituencies
now demands horse-trading among
hundreds.
Not every major piece of legislation
before Congress is so complicated, but
the farm bill is a perfect example of
how tough it has become to get a major
bill through, with so many competing
interests and so much money at stake.
Everything on Capitol Hill’s plate this
year — from immigration reform to gun
control to the upcoming debt ceiling
fight — requires legislative language
that a wide array of interest groups can
agree to. This would be daunting but
attainable if Congress operated the way
it once did. But it doesn’t.
For what the farm bill’s travails
also illustrate is that Congress is now
a legislatively challenged institution.
The leaders on the Hill have fewer
tools of persuasion than they once did.
They abolished “earmarks,” so they
can no longer promise a bridge or a
road to secure a member’s vote, and
they carry less respect and political
clout. The political parties that once
helped enforce discipline can no lon-
ger do so, since politicians these days
often identify themselves with outside
groups like the Tea Party rather than
with their political party. With the rise
of Super PACs, neither congressional
leaders nor political parties have as
much influence over fundraising — and
hence the “loyalty” it once imposed —
as they used to.
To make matters worse, many mem-
bers — especially in the Republican
Party, though it’s not limited to the
GOP’s side of the aisle — do not like
to compromise. As I suggested at the
beginning, compromise is at the heart
of the farm bill. For the last 50 years,
it’s been put together by joining crop
support and nutrition support — food
stamps — in order to win the votes of
both rural and urban lawmakers. And
within the rural sections of the bill,
wheeling and dealing on the specifics
has been the only way to generate legis-
lation that farm-state legislators could
all agree upon. Now that formula is
broken, though I do believe an accom-
modation will be worked out.
But the problems go beyond that, and
it’s not bad that the usual inertia on
the farm bill has found difficult going.
The country needs to confront basic
questions about the $16 billion annu-
al subsidy and heavy trade protection
accorded to agriculture — when fewer
than 1 percent of Americans are farm-
ers and farming has become a hugely
corporate industry. Likewise, with one
in six Americans now receiving food
stamps, we need a real debate about the
food stamp program, which makes up
80 percent of the cost of the bill.
In other words, we’re not getting
what we actually need, which is a real
policy debate on the role of the govern-
ment in agriculture. If Congress were
working properly, this might have been
possible. Increasingly, I fear it’s beyond
Capitol Hill’s reach.
Lee Hamilton is Director of the Center
on Congress at Indiana University. He
was a member of the U.S. House of
Representatives for 34 years.
DECATUR DAILY DEMOCRAT
VOL. CXI, NO. 182, Thurs., Aug. 1, 2013
The Decatur Daily Democrat (USPS 150-780) is pub-
lished daily except Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day
and Christmas Day by: HORIZON PUBLISHING CO. OF
INDIANA, 141. S. Second St., Decatur, IN 46733.
Periodicals postage paid at Decatur, IN. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to the Decatur Daily
Democrat,141 S. 2nd St., Decatur, IN 46733.
August 1, 2013
Today is the 213th day of 2013
and the 42nd day of summer.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1834,
Britain abolished slavery in all of
its colonies.
In 1876, Colorado became the
38th U.S. state.
In 1957, the United States and
Canada announced the forma-
tion of the North American Air
Defense Command (NORAD).
In 1966, ex-Marine Charles
Whitman opened fire from a
tower at the University of Texas
at Austin, killing 14 people and
wounding 31.
TODAY’S FACT: “Video Killed
the Radio Star” by the Buggles
was the first music video aired on
MTV when the network launched
on this day in 1981.
TODAY’S QUOTE: “It is better to
fail in originality than to succeed
in imitation.” — Herman Melville
First white
man in
indiana?
By AnDREA nEAL
Historians aren’t sure
which white man stepped
first on Hoosier soil but he
most certainly was French
and he likely arrived in
the 1670s — 150 years
before Indiana statehood.
“Possibly it was an
obscure Frenchman whose
adventures were never
recorded — if he lived to
tell the tale,” wrote the
historians John Barnhart
and Dorothy Riker in their
book, Indiana to 1816,
the first in a five-volume
history published for the
state’s sesquicentennial
in 1971.
Perhaps it was Jacques
Marquette, the Jesuit
priest sent to New France
— now Canada — as mis-
sionary to the Indians. He
explored the Mississippi
River with Louis Jolliet
and returned to north-
ern Michigan possibly by
way of northern Indiana
in 1675.
Or it may have been
René-Robert Cavelier,
Sieur de La Salle, who set
up camp at present-day
South Bend in 1679 dur-
ing a portage from the St.
Joseph to the Kankakee
River. LaSalle would later
explore the Mississippi
River and claim the sur-
rounding land for France.
A historic marker marks
the spot one mile east of
where LaSalle and his
party camped overnight at
South Bend. The mark-
er declares LaSalle “the
first white man to enter
Indiana,” though subse-
quent scholarship has
cast doubt on the claim,
said Pam Bennett, director
of the Indiana Historical
Bureau.
The bureau is in the
process of updating older
markers in time for the
state’s bicentennial in
2016. The revisions will
reflect new research as
well as more demanding
standards for documenta-
tion of a subject’s historic
significance.
Another LaSalle mark-
er installed in 2000 on
the Kankakee River near
the Starke and LaPorte
County lines is less
definitive. It describes
the explorer’s canoe trip
“down the meandering
Kankakee River through
vast marsh-swamp-dune
ecosystems that covered
over 625 square miles
and teemed with game
including fish, waterfowl
and mammals.”
The portage route
between the rivers
stretched about four
miles crossing mostly
prairie grass and woods.
The trail, long erased, was
well known among 17th-
century trappers, who
learned of it from Indian
guides.
Because Jolliet placed
the St. Joseph River on
a map in 1674, histori-
ans suspect he knew of
the portage and may have
chosen that route when
he accompanied an ail-
ing Marquette from Illinois
back to the Great Lakes
in 1675.
“The question of who
was first may not ever be
answered.
This much is defi-
nite. The French beat the
English to Indiana — some
of them merely passing
through on their way else-
where and others setting
up forts or hunting for
beaver in the lucrative fur
trade. In the 17th and 18th
centuries, France’s North
American empire stretched
from Canada to the Gulf of
Mexico, and two northern
Indiana rivers held a stra-
tegic position.
Neal is an adjunct schol-
ar with the Indiana Policy
Review Foundation.
Health care battle fraught with partisan numbers
By toM LoBIAnCo
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — In
the raging federal health care
debate, numbers are turning out
to be some of the most partisan
tools available to Democrats,
Republicans and everyone with
a stake in the game.
Indiana residents have got-
ten a rare look at the spinning
of statistics and price tags that
happens regularly in govern-
ment as Gov. Mike Pence’s point
man on federal health care esti-
mated that residents would
pay 72 percent more for health
insurance through the insur-
ance exchange being built.
That, of course, is an incred-
ible simplification of an incred-
ibly complex topic, something
Democratic supporters of
President Barack Obama’s sig-
nature legislation pointed out
shortly afterward and followed
with some spin of their own.
Add to an already-confus-
ing mix of cutoffs, dependents,
income brackets, co-pays and
credits and both sides will find
plenty to support whatever con-
clusion they like.
The Pence administration,
which has opposed the health
care law while readying for its
implementation over the next
few months, found numbers
that confirm its bias.
‘‘This new data regrettably
confirms the negative impact of
the Affordable Care Act on the
insurance market in Indiana,’’
said Logan Harrison, deputy
commissioner at the Indiana
Department of Insurance
in a statement announcing
the assumed rate hike. ‘‘The
Affordable Care Act requires
many Hoosiers to purchase
more comprehensive and more
expensive health insurance than
they may want or need. These
rates call into question just how
affordable health insurance will
really be for many Hoosiers.’’
The state did not release the
data on how it came up with this
estimate, but The Washington
Post reported this was likely the
result of ‘‘squishing’’ together
all the plans that would be
available to Indiana residents,
from the cheapest ‘‘bronze’’ plan
to the most expensive ‘‘gold’’
option and coming up with one
number.
Indiana Democrats quickly
fired back.
‘‘I think Hoosiers should be
very leery of this report. These
numbers simply don’t tell the
whole story on how the imple-
mentation of the Affordable
Care Act will affect Hoosiers,’’
said Sen. Jean Breaux,
D-Indianapolis, in a statement.
‘‘The report leaves out any infor-
mation on tax credits available
to Hoosiers to put toward the
cost of coverage, along with an
inflated and flawed assump-
tion on the average cost as a
whole.’’
Get ready for more blurring
of the lines as the long, drawn-
out, political clash stretches
through its fourth year. And
not just from Republican oppo-
nents.
As the opening of the insur-
ance exchanges draws near,
Obama and his health care
team have taken to the stump
with their own tales of insur-
ance rates dropping. If Indiana
is the Republican horror story,
New York has become the
Democratic fairy tale, with esti-
mates from New York Democrats
that insurance rates will drop
by 53 percent. That has caused
Republicans to cry foul.
This wouldn’t be the first
time price tags and numbers
have been cherry-picked in the
ongoing health care battle. The
state’s actuary, Milliman, has
produced regular reports with
detailed estimates of how much
expanding Medicaid would
cost. There are breakdowns,
tables, broad descriptions of
the variables used and a range
of expected costs to the state,
from $2 billion and $2.6 billion
over seven years.
The number Indiana’s
Republicans landed on is the
most dire estimate from the
report. Count on more spin-
ning prices and numbers as
the battle moves to the air-
waves.
Decatur Daily Democrat
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Thursday, August 1, 2013 • Page 5A
Sense & Sensitivity
by Harriette Cole
Pimples In Menopause Cause Hot Flashes
DEAR HARRI-
ETTE: I am so embar-
rassed. As a grown woman,
I have started to get acne --
again. I am in menopause,
which I have been cele-
brating, but the last thing I
imagined would happen is
that I would revert back to
my teen years. I shudder at
the thought that I will have
to go through the trauma I
experienced as a teen now
that I am over 50. Just re-
membering those sensitive
days makes my stomach
hurt. I am single and dat-
ing. I don’t want to become
self-conscious about my
face now. OMG! -- Bumpy,
Chicago
DEAR BUMPY: I
hate to tell you this, but one
of the side effects of meno-
pause can be adult-onset
acne. Horrible, I know! The
good news is you do not
have to suffer in pain and
shame.
By all means, go to
a dermatologist right away.
Get a professional evalua-
tion. Your doctor will likely
prescribe a way to cleanse
your skin along with medi-
cation that can help curb
your acne.
As with every-
thing in life, each new ex-
perience brings ups and
downs. Menopause has
many surprises for wom-
en. Welcome the experi-
ence, and get support as
you need it. To learn more,
read everydayhealth.com/
menopause/menopause-
and-acne.aspx.
DEAR HARRI-
ETTE: I am a 41-year-old
single woman, and I would
like to be married by age
43. Some of my friends
think I am crazy because I
made a hard-line decision.
Currently, the prospects are
bleak, but I have the faith
that I will fnd my prince.
With every cloud there is a
silver lining. I have a male
friend who is 41 years and
single, and I have known
him since we were 17
years old. We dated when
were very young. We have
always kept in touch during
our ups and downs, and we
remain friends to this day.
I recently called
my male friend to check
his temperature about rela-
tionships and marriage. To
my surprise, he was excit-
ed about the possibility of
marriage. He even included
the idea of having children,
and I was pleased with our
conversation. I made an in-
formal proposition to him,
saying if we are still single
by the age of 43, we should
become a couple. This is a
risky move on my part: You
do not know whom we may
meet in the next two years.
But I like him, and I hope it
can happen. Should I wait
for my prince, or should
I keep my head in the
clouds? -- Two Years and
Counting, Chicago
DEAR TWO
YEARS AND COUNTING:
I like the idea of a deadline
in the sense that it gets you
to focus on attaining some-
thing that you want so much
-- whether it manifests or
not. I also like the idea of
your childhood friend as a
partner -- if the two of you
actually like each other in
that way.
What I do not like
is the two of you thinking
about this as a backup
plan. Instead, why not start
dating and see if you are
compatible? Honor your
friendship by fguring out if
or how it will evolve.
Community Calendar
Roger and Heidi
Griebel of Fort Wayne,
along with Pam Daniels
of Decatur and the late
James Daniels, are
pleased to announce the
engagement of their chil-
dren, Megan Griebel of
Fort Wayne and Dustin
Daniels of Hoagland.
Megan is a 2010 grad-
uate of Heritage High
School and is attending
IPFW University, where
she is working towards
a nursing degree. She
is currently employed by
Parkview Hospital.
A 2008 graduate of
Bellmont High School,
Dustin received a degree
in business adminis-
tration from Ivy Tech
Community College. He
is currently employed by
Penske Truck Leasing.
The couple plan to
marry August 17, at
the Messiah Lutheran
Church in Fort Wayne.
EngagEmEnt
Griebel ~ Daniels
THURSDAY, August 1:
Senior Citizens play cards, 1 p.m., Riverside
Center.
Monroe United Methodist Church Farmer’s Wagon,
1 p.m. (line is to form no earlier than 12 p.m.)
TOPS Club weigh-in, 5:30 p.m.; meeting 6:15 p.m.,
Woodcrest Activity Building.
Weight Watchers, 6 p.m., weigh-in; 6:30 p.m. meet-
ing, Adams Memorial Hospital Decatur Room.
Sober Beginnings, 6:30-8 p.m., Adams Memorial
Hospital Berne Room.
Divorce Care 4 Kids, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Decatur
Church of God.
A.A. (open) Big Book meeting, 7 p.m., First Church
of the Nazarene, Berne.
FRIDAY, August 2:
Immanuel House, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 8545 N 500 E,
Decatur.
Operation Help food pantry for Decatur and Monroe
residents, 1-3 p.m., Adams County Service Complex.
A.A. Happy Hour Discussion Group (closed), 5-6
p.m., Decatur Church of God.
Free community scrapbook night, 6-11 p.m.,
Common Ground Church.
Reformers Unanimous Addiction Recovery Program,
7-9 p.m., Grace Fellowship Church.
SATURDAY, August 3:
A.A., 7 p.m., (open speaker/discussion) Cross
United Church, Berne.
Wish comes true for local teen
Editor’s note: The fol-
lowing is an edited letter
received from April and
Chris Gross of Decatur
regarding their son,
Brendan, and his recent
wish from the Make a
Wish Foundation.
Our fourth child,
Brendan, was born
July 27, 1999, and was
expected to be approxi-
mately 10-pounds. The
doctor induced my labor
on the 27th, only to
discover Brendan was
breach, meaning he had
not turned in the womb
and would be delivered
out feet first rather than
head first.
Due to several complica-
tions at birth, Brendan
was on a ventilator to
breathe and required
round the clock care in
the Neonatal Intensive
Care Unit (NICU). After 30
days, the NICU decided to
send Brendan home. We
tried to get home health
care to help us with him,
but they refused his
case. Brendan was too
fragile.
We took him to Riley
Children’s hospital for
a second opinion, and
they clarified our worst
fears: Brendan had wide
spread brain damage and
would have severe cere-
bral palsy. He would have
significant developmental
delays and would never be
able to walk, talk, or eat
(he has a feeding tube).
Again, they sent us home
to “care for and love” him.
We later found out from
a couple of nurses that
he was ever expected to
make it.
Here we are 14 years
later. Brendan absolute-
ly loves water. We were
on vacation last year at
Lake George in Fremont,
Ind., with family and we
took Brendan swimming.
One of our lake neigh-
bors saw him and said
we should try and get
him a pool through Make
A Wish. When we came
home I started search-
ing.
I contacted Brendan’s
Doctor, Keith Harvey, and
gave him all the informa-
tion required in order to
receive a wish. Make A
Wish only grants wishes
to terminal children and
I wasn’t sure if Brendan
would qualify. After con-
tacting Dr. Harvey, I pur-
sued the “wish”.
Immediately, the
Foundation contacted us
and said they didn’t think
Brendan would qualify ...
typically traumatic brain
injuries are not consid-
ered fatal. However, Dr.
Harvey and his nurse,
Dianne Neadstine, both
worked relentlessly and
fought for Brendan. Dr.
Harvey proved Brendan
does qualify for Make A
Wish, and we moved for-
ward, asking for a pool
for Brendan because he
is completely free in the
water. It is there where
he is the happiest.
It took about a year
for this process and on
June 3rd of this year,
MasterSpas of Fort
Wayne delivered a swim
spa for Brendan. We
have been able to take
him swimming, which
he loves, and in turn
helps with his sleep (he
doesn’t sleep well due to
the brain damage).
We feel so blessed to
have received such an
important gift for our
son. It has been a roller
coaster ride during the
last 14 years, but we just
take one day at a time.
We know a young couple
who are going through
something very similar
with their daughter....I
feel for them, it is such
a scary thing to see your
child struggle to just live
each day. We have had to
think about things that
you just do t have to
with a normal, healthy
child. If we are able to
help one family through
sharing Brendan’s story,
then it is our pleasure.
I relate our jour-
ney to the Wizard of
Oz movie. We are trav-
eling that yellow brick
road and running into so
many obstacles along the
way. We have gotten lost
many times (scarecrow),
learned a level of love
through this little boy
(tinman) and learned to
be courageous when we
didn’t know how (lion) all
while being afraid of the
crazy unknown disabil-
ity (wicked witch) and we
are searching for answers
and someday, when we
finally get to the end of
the road and meet the
Wizard (God), hopefully
all will be revealed.
ALL SMILES ... Brendan Gross shows just how happy he is in his new swim spa
courtesy of the Make a Wish Foundation. (Photo provided)
SummEr’S End
EvEntS SEt at
gEnEva Library
Two special events
are planned at the
Adams Public Library–
Geneva in the final
week of summer vaca-
tion. Youngsters can
“Dig into Science” and
also enjoy a movie mar-
athon.
“Dig into Science”
meets from 1:30-2:30
p.m. on Wednesday,
August 7. Participants
will learn about science
principles in a hands-
on science session
for youths in grades
1-5. Reservations are
requested.
On August 9 a
back-to-school movie
marathon is planned
with pizza and pop-
corn. The movies will
start at 6 p.m. with
age-appropriate mov-
ies as the evening pro-
gresses. Possible mov-
ies include: Wreck-It
Ralph, School of Rock,
and Here Comes the
Boom.
The event is free for
school age children and
families.
SASC
weekly
activities
The South Adams
Senior Center provides
weekly activities for
area seniors.
Activities and activ-
ity photos are available
on the South Adams
Senior Center Facebook
page.
Rides to daytime
events are available
through the Council on
Aging, with at least a
one week notice and
a minimum donation
appreciated.
Call (260) 589-8877
for more information or
visit www.saseniorcen-
ter.com.
A Healthy Cooking
class taught by Deb
Mishler will be held
at 10 a.m. on Friday,
August 9. This class
is sponsored by Swiss
Village. Those inter-
ested in attending are
asked to pre-register
in order for an accu-
rate lunch count to be
made.
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 6A • Thursday, August 1, 2013
ADAMS WOODCREST HOG ROAST
AND ANTIQUE CAR SHOW
Adams Woodcrest will be
hosting their Annual Hog Roast and
Antique Car Show (Old Fort Model A’s
Group) for ages 55+ on Saturday,
August 24th from 4:00pm-6:00pm on
the Woodcrest Campus.
There will be a self-guided
“open house tour” of Villa #35. Please
RSVP to Natasha by August 12th at
728-3989.
CATCH YOUR BREATH 8K & 5K &
1 MILE FUN RUN
The Worthman Fitness Center
at Adams Memorial Hospital will be
hosting their annual “Catch Your Breath
Race” on Saturday, September 14,
2013. Registration begins at 8am for all
events. The 8K & 5K Race begin at
9am and the 1 Mile Fun Run begins at
10:15 am.
The race is held across the
street from Adams Memorial Hospital
(1100 Mercer Ave., Decatur, IN 46733)
at the trail head of the River Greenway
by Adams Evergreen Assisted Living
Apartments. $15 entry fee until
September 7th, and a $20 entry fee
after Sepember 7th. Registration forms
are available at the Worthman Fitness
Center, on-line at adamshospital.com,
and will also be available in the local
newspapers. T-shirts included with reg-
istration fee.
THE BASICS: MEMORY LOSS,
DEMENTIA & ALZHEIMER’S
DISEASE
The Alzheimer’s Association
with be holding the above class at
Adams Memorial Hospital on
Wednesday, August 14th from 2pm-3-
pm in the Berne Room at Adams
Memorial Hospital.
Pre-registration is not required.
This is an excellent class for families
that are coping with Alzheimer’s disease
within their family.
AMERICAN RED CROSS BLOOD
DRIVE
Will be held on Friday, August 30th from
10am to 4pm at Adams Memorial
Hospital in Decatur Rooms #1 and #2.
Call 724-2145 x1600 to schedule an
appointment.
WEIGHT WATCHER’S MEETINGS
Weight Watchers is now hold-
ing their weekly meetings at Adams
Memorial Hospital on Thursday
Evenings. Weigh-in time is from
6:00pm-6:30pm, and the meeting is
from 6:30pm-7:00pm. Meetings are
held in Decatur Room #1 at the hospital.
To join, simply attend a meeting and
sign-up in person.
AMH MATERNITY CENTER OFFERS
CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION CLASSES
Space is limited, sign up now
for Childbirth Education Classes at
Adams Memorial Hospital. The next
class will be on Saturday, September
7th from 9am to 3pm. The classes will
be held in Decatur Room #1 at AMH.
The AMH Maternity Center
offers childbirth classes to help you
answer many questions you may have;
not only concerning “epidurals” and
other options for pain relief, but also
how to know when you are in labor, what
to bring to the hospital and how your part-
ner can provide support when you are in
labor. We also help you know what to
expect, and learn how life changes after
the baby is born. A tour of our beautiful
Maternity Center is also included. The
cost is only $20 for those families deliver-
ing at AMH. Please call Sharolyn Faurote
at 260-724-2145 x2505 to schedule or if you
have questions.
MOM’S SUPPORT GROUP
A support group for mothers
will be held on Mondays in August
beginning at 1pm.
The meetings will be held in
the OB Department Education Room at
Adams Memorial Hospital.
Come talk to other moms,
share experiences, and get help with
breastfeeding questions. For new moth-
ers and pregnant women, babies are
also welcome!
DIABETES CLASS
The Adams Memorial Hospital
Diabetes Connection will be holding
their monthly diabetes class on
Thursday, August 22nd from 7:30am to
2:30pm in Berne Rm at Adams Memorial
Hospital.
Classes will focus on several
different diabetes topics, including carbo-
hydrate counting and dietary manage-
ment, foot and skin care, exercise, the
emotional aspect of having diabetes, self-
monitoring blood glucose meters, and
how often to check glucose levels, life-
style hints to help control blood sugar,
how specific drug classes prescribed for
diabetes work, drug side effects, and drug
interactions. There is no out of pocket
expense for the diabetes class; AMH
accepts what Medicare and insurance
pay for the education. Instructors are
certified diabetes educators.
Anyone planning to attend
must pre-register with Kris Bischoff,
R.D., CDE at 724-2145 x1710.
HEALTH CARE PROVIDER CPR
CPR will be held on Monday,
August 5th from 5pm to 9pm in Decatur
Rm. #1 at Adams Memorial Hospital.
Please call 724-2145 x2256 to
register. Free to AMH employees and
$45 for non-employees. American Heart
Association Certified.
FREE FOOT SCREENS
Wednesday, August 7th from
5pm-7pm in the Geneva Room at Adams
Memorial Hospital Free foot screens by
Dr. Worpell of Northeast Foot & Ankle
Clinic…724-2145 x6209 to schedule.
HEALTHY HABITS… DIABETES
SUPPORT GROUP
Adams Memorial Hospital will
be holding their Healthy Habits Diabetes
Support Group as listed below. The
classes will be offered at Adams
Memorial Hospital on Wednesday morn-
ings from 10:30am - 12:00pm in the
Geneva Room on the following dates:
Wednesday, August 14th
Wednesday, August 28th
For more information please call:
Adams Memorial Behavioral Health Outpatient
Services, Behavioral Health Resource Center
Decatur at 260-728-3906.
Alzheimer’s/Caregiver’s Support
Group
The next Alzheimer’s support
group meeting will be held on Thursday,
August 15th at 4:00 pm, in Decatur
Room #2 at Adams Memorial Hospital.
The Alzheimer’s/Caregiver’s
Support Group is designed to help ease
the burden of the caregiver of dementia
patients or others in a loving and confi-
dential setting. Please call Dr. John
Gibson, Dir. BHRC at AMH for informa-
tion at 724-2145 ext. 3404.
BLOOD PRESSURE CLINICS
The Following Blood Pressure
Clinics are sponsored by Adams
Memorial Hospital:
Tuesday, August 13th
–8:00am-10:00am at McDonalds in
Decatur.
Tuesday, August 13th -10:00
a.m.-11:00 a.m.-Decatur Community
Markets, East Monroe Street.
Tuesday, August 27th
-8:00am-10:00am at McDonalds in
Decatur.
Tuesday, August 27th -10:00
a.m.-11a.m., Decatur Community
Markets, East Monroe Street.
WORTHMAN FITNESS CENTER
CLASS SCHEDULE
Call the WFC for more class
information 724-2145 x1537.
Participants must register in person at
the AMH Worthman Fitness Center. All
classes are held at Adams Memorial
Hospital. Please call WFC for informa-
tion on class pricing.
Cycling Class
Wednesdays at 6:30pm in Worthman
Fitness Center.
Yoga Class
Participants must bring a yoga mat to
class.
Early Morning Yoga
Tues. & Thurs. at 5am in the First Floor
Classroom.
The Silver Sneakers Exercise
Program is held on Mondays, Tuesdays,
and Thursdays at 9:30am at Adams
Memorial Hospital in Decatur Room 2.
August Events at Adams Health Network
260.724.2145
Berne: 260.589.3913
www.adamshospital.com
Exceptional Care. Close to You.
Airlines’ in endless quest for better boarding
‘‘It would be a lie to
say that never happens,’’
says Tessa Letren, an
American gate agent at
Baltimore-Washington
International Airport.
‘‘We can’t always police
that.’’
Still, Letren supports
the new policy, which she
says cuts the amount of
time that planes spend
on the ground between
flights.
Before the 2010
merger of United and
Continental airlines,
United used the inside-
out method of boarding
— window seats first,
then middle, then aisle
— while Continental
went back-to-front. After
much testing, the com-
bined airline kept the
United approach. Earlier
this year, United set up
additional boarding lines
in the terminals to attack
congestion in the gate
area.
The back-to-front sys-
tem, still used by many
airlines, seems logical.
But some studies have
shown that it’s slower
than windows-middle-
aisle.
‘‘If you’re on the aisle
and somebody sitting
next to you in the mid-
dle seat shows up, you
need to unbuckle and
maybe get up,’’ says Ken
Bostock, United’s man-
aging director of custom-
er experience. ‘‘That can
take 20, 25 seconds, and
that happens a lot during
the boarding process.’’
Lou Agudo, a United
gate agent who worked
at Continental before
the merger, says board-
ing by rows practically
invited confusion. Just
when he thought every-
one in Group 2 had gone
through, and he called
Group 3 to start, ‘‘Twenty
people would walk up and
say they didn’t hear the
announcement.’’ Some
had missed the call for
their group, while others
decided to get in line no
matter what, he says.
The extra lanes have
made his job easier.
Anything to tidy up the
gate area will help, in the
view of Yosief Ghirmai, an
auditor for defense con-
tractor Raytheon Co. in
Frisco, Texas, who says
foreign airlines make
boarding much easier for
elite-level frequent fliers
like himself.
‘‘The international
airlines respect the pri-
ority boarding system,’’
Ghirmai says, citing Hong
Kong’s Cathay Pacific as
an example. ‘‘Here, you
have to fight to get to
the priority boarding line
— all the bags, all the
kids. The concept (in the
U.S.) is the same, but
the execution is much
better over there.’’
Selita Garcia of
Chicago wondered why
anybody in the front of
the plane would want to
board first.
‘‘We’re always bump-
ing into all those busi-
ness-class people — if
it’s not my purse, then
I’m hitting them with
my bag,’’ says Garcia,
who manages a doctor’s
office and was taking her
grandson to vacation in
Puerto Vallarta, Mexico,
recently. ‘‘Why let them
on first? The plane is not
taking off until everybody
is on the plane.’’
Others like to get set-
tled before takeoff.
Kausalya Palavesam,
a marketing manager for
Texas Instruments who
was coming back from
a conference in Atlanta,
says about 15 passen-
gers on her American
flight took the airline’s
offer to check their car-
ry-on bags at the gate
and board sooner.
‘‘Why not?’’ she says.
‘‘There won’t be room for
the bag (in the overhead
bin) anyway.’’
By DAVID KOENIG
AP Airlines Writer
DALLAS (AP) —
Getting people on and off
an airplane quickly is so
complicated that even an
astrophysicist couldn’t
figure it out.
The astrophysicist,
Jason Steffen of the
University of Illinois,
normally contemplates
things such as axion-like
particles. But after wait-
ing in one boarding line
too many, he turned to
the mysteries of airline
seating.
‘‘I thought there had
to be a better way,’’ he
says.
So, after a series of
calculations, he deduced
that the best system
would be a combination of
filling window seats first,
then middle and aisle
ones, while also spacing
the boarding passengers
two rows apart.
There was just one
problem — passengers
would have to board
in precise order. Good
luck with that. These
are the same passengers
who don’t turn off their
phones even after they’re
told it’s a federal law.
‘ ‘ Well,’ ’ Stef fen
observes, ‘‘I understand
why airline people aren’t
calling me.’’
But the search for the
perfect boarding process
goes on.
Most airlines allow
first-class and other elite
customers to board first.
After that, some fill the
rear rows first and work
toward the front.
Others fill window
seats and work in toward
the aisle. Some used to
employ a hybrid called
the reverse-pyramid.
Southwest Airlines has
random seating: There
are no assigned seats —
passengers sort things
out themselves. They
can pay extra to be near
the front of the boarding
line.
All of this matters more
than you might think.
Passengers want to
board early to find space
in the overhead bins for
their rolling carry-on
bags.
For airlines, every
minute that a plane sits
at the gate makes it more
likely that the flight will
be late, hurting the car-
rier’s on-time rating and
causing passengers to
miss connecting flights.
There’s an eco-
nomic cost to running
late too. Researchers
from Northern Illinois
University say that at
one major airline, which
they didn’t identify, every
extra minute at the gate
added $30 in costs.
American Airlines,
which uses a back-to-
front system for board-
ing coach passengers
after it takes care of elite
customers, says that it
takes about 25 minutes
to board passengers on
a smaller, narrow-body
plane such as a Boeing
737 and about 35 min-
utes on a bigger plane
such as a Boeing 777.
In recent weeks,
United and American
— the nation’s biggest
and third-biggest carri-
ers — have rolled out
new strategies for faster
boarding.
— American is letting
passengers board sooner
if they don’t put anything
in the overhead bins. The
idea is to get more peo-
ple seated quickly before
passengers with rolling
bags clog the aisle.
— United reduced
the number of board-
ing groups from seven to
five while adding lanes
in gate areas — from two
to five at big airports.
That’s designed to elimi-
nate ‘‘gate lice’’ — the
name road warriors use
for those anxious pas-
sengers with big carry-
ons who cause a traffic
jam by creeping forward
long before their group is
called.
American and United
tested their new proce-
dures in a handful of air-
ports before rolling them
out across the country in
time for the peak sum-
mer travel season. United
CEO Jeff Smisek says
his airline’s new method
has helped cut boarding-
related departure delays
by more than 60 per-
cent.
Boarding methods go
back to the dawn of com-
mercial flight, but they’ve
gotten more complicated
as the airlines have cre-
ated different classes of
passengers and sold the
right to board early.
Since 2008, most large
airlines have imposed fees
for checking a bag, which
encourages passengers
to carry more on board.
At the same time, air-
lines have reduced flights
to control costs, making
planes more crowded.
The result: Space in the
overhead bins has never
been more valuable.
Recognizing the poten-
tial value in that coveted
real estate, Spirit Airlines
began charging for stow-
ing a bag in the overhead
three years ago — the fee
now runs up to $100.
Spirit says the fee
speeds up boarding by
cutting down the number
of carry-on bags. The big
airlines haven’t copied
Spirit for fear of anger-
ing customers. They’ve
looked for other ways to
improve boarding.
In May, American
began offering early
boarding to passen-
gers with just a person-
al item that fits under
the seat. In a test at
several airports, it cut
boarding by two minutes
per flight, according to
Kevin Doeksen, the air-
line’s director of custom-
er planning. With about
1,900 flights per day on
American, that adds up.
What’s to stop a pas-
senger from moving up in
line by promising to put
a personal item under
the seat, then stuffing it
in the overhead bin any-
way?
US carmaker Chrysler
comes to Fiat rescue
MILAN (AP) — Strong
sales by its U.S. subsid-
iary, Chrysler, came to
the rescue of Italian car-
maker Fiat on Tuesday
as it reported a quadru-
pling in second-quarter
net income.
Fiat, which is based
in the northern city of
Turin, said net profit for
the three months end-
ing June 30 was 142
million euros ($188 mil-
lion), up from a restated
profit of 32 million euros
in the same period last
year. Without Chrysler,
in which Fiat holds a
majority stake, the Italian
company would have lost
247 million euros, as
European sales dropped
5 percent.
Fiat shares dropped
4.7 percent to 6 euros in
Milan trading.
Worldwide car ship-
ments were up 5 percent
in the quarter to 1.2 mil-
lion units, more than half
of those Chrysler brands.
North American sales
rose 4 percent, while Asia
and Latin America post-
ed double-digit growth.
Revenues for the quarter
were 22 billion euros, up
4 percent over the previ-
ous year.
Europe’s recession
continued to weigh on
Fiat’s results. Fiat sold
234,000 passenger cars
badged Fiat, Lancia and
Alfa Romeo in the quar-
ter. Its market share
shrank 0.5 percentage
BHS fall practice times set
Bellmont High School has released dates for fall
sports to begin including girls golf, cross country,
boys tennis, football, soccer, and volleyball.
Girls golf will begin tomorrow from 9-11 a.m.
at Cross Creek Golf Course, while all other sports
practices will begin on Monday, August 5.
Cross country will start at 8 a.m. for both the
boys and girls, Monday morning, while both boys
and girls soccer will also begin at 8 a.m. and run
until 10 a.m., then run a second practice from 5-7
p.m. on the BHS practice field.
Tennis (boys) will meet on the courts from 4:30-
6:30 p.m., while volleyball tryouts will be held in
the main gym from 6:30-9 p.m. Football two-a-
days will run in the afternoon from 2:30-4:30 p.m.
on Monday as well as 6:30-8 p.m. later in the eve-
ning.
All athletes must have an IHSAA approved
physical form, medical consent card, concussion
acknowledgment and signature form, and the BHS
athletic and extracurricular cod of conduct and
legal reporting waiver form. The office will be open
from 8a.m.-3p.m. during the week for athletes to
obtain and submit these forms. For questions, call
724-7121.
Iron Kid Triathlon results
The annual Iron Kid Triathlon was held on
Saturday, July 27 at Bellmont High School.
The event split kids into six different age groups
based on age as they ran, biked, and swam through
to the finish line. Also based on age was the dis-
tance for each groups’ trials.
Noah Hunley was a winner in the 5-6 year old
group with a time of 13:57, while Mason Martinez
was second with a time of 14:38. In third was
Ethan Curtis at 15:03.
The most turnout for the event was in the 7-8
year old age group but it was Owen Wanner who
emerged victorious with a time of 10:48 besting
the field by nearly a minute. Austin Christner was
second at 11:40 with Catherine Bauman finishing
third at 12:49.
In the 9-10 age group, it was Kaylee Fuelling
who won the day with a time of 10:46, while Brooks
Myers was second at 11:31 and Sophie Krull was
just behind at 11:49.
In the 11-12 age group, Drew Velasco was the
only contestant to finish in under 10 minutes win-
ning the division with a time of 9:58 blasting the
rest of the field. It was Corey Oliver who finished
second with Jon Ruble taking third with times of
11:10 and 11:35 respectively.
Olivia Von Gunten was a winner at the 13-14
level finishing with a time of 10:19, while Emily
Fuelling was second at 11:49 and Riley Stetler was
third at 12:25. Mae Baczynski was the winner of
the 15-16 age group with a time of 12:27.
Elks to host scramble at CC
The Elks Lodge will be hosting their annu-
al Men's Bid Florida Scramble Tournament on
Saturday, August 10 at Cross Creek Golf Club.
There will also be an auction held the day before
(Friday), which the $25 entry fee for the golfing
includes. There will be snacks available at the auc-
tion and attendants will be allowed to grill their
own steak dinner Saturday after the tournament.
The golf foursomes must include at least one
Elks member per team with no handicap limit
and the tourney is open to both men and women.
There will be skins available at $40 apiece.
Team captains must sign their squad up by
Tuesday, August 6 and full teams will be listed no
later than Thursday, August 8.
Decatur Golf Championship
to kick off this weekend
Terry Laurent, owner and operator of Cross
Creek Golf Club, announced today that the 2013
Decatur City Golf Championship will take place
this weekend on Saturday, August 3 and Sunday,
August 4.
The entry for the event will be $30 and that does
not include green fees or electric carts. The tee
times will start at 1 p.m. on Saturday and all golf-
ers must be either a resident or work in Decatur to
participate. Members of the CC Golf Club or those
who play in the men's and women's leagues are
also eligible to play.
There will be several divisions including men's,
ladies, men's seniors (50+), men's super seniors
(65+), as well as junior boys and girls, which will
be flighted after Saturday play.
For more information, call the pro shot at 724-
4316.
SportS HigHligHtS
By Dylan Malone
Cheer On Your Team! Go To
To Send GOOD LUCK Or CONGRATULATIONS
to Your Favorite Sports Team Or Athlete.
www.DecaturDailyDemocrat.com/sports
Page 2B
Sports
Scoreboard
Page 1B Thursday, augusT 1, 2013
inSide
MLB—Cubs 6, Brewers 1...Tigers 11, Nats 1...Reds 4, Padres 1...Indians 6, W. Sox 5...Pirates 5, Cards 4
SCIENCE IN SPORTS—The first instance of
global electronic communications took place in
1871 when news of the Kentucky Derby winner
was telegraphed from London to Calcutta in
under 5 minutes.
FINISHING STRONG—Mae Baczynski, an Iron Kid
Triathlete, is being congratulated by Mayor John
Schultz for her first place finish in the 15/16 year old
age division. (Photo provided)
PREPARING FOR A LONG DAY—The crowd at Bellmont High School’s pool
cheers for Katie Summers, a five-year old Iron Kid contestant, as she waves
after hearing her name being called before the swim portion of the triathlon.
Katie finished third in her age group. (Photo provided)
Franklin highlights field at World Trials
By ANDREW DAMPF
AP Sports Writer
BARCELONA, Spain
(AP) — Australian sprint-
er Cate Campbell showed
off her starting speed
Thursday in morning
heats of the 100-meter
freestyle at the swimming
world championships.
Campbell was 0.10
ahead of Britta Steffen’s
2009 world record halfway
through the race and then
cruised in the second lap
to set a leading time of
53.24 seconds.
American teenager
Missy Franklin qualified
second in a personal-best
53.36 as she attempts to
extend her perfect record
of three golds in three
events so far.
Sarah Sjostrom of
Sweden advanced third in
53.61, Steffen was fourth in
53.93 and Olympic cham-
pion Ranomi Kromowidjojo
of the Netherlands was
fifth in 54.12.
Steffen’s world record is
52.07.
In other prelims,
Olympic champion Tyler
Clary led the men’s 200
backstroke in 1:56.76 and
American teammate Micah
Lawrence topped the wom-
en’s 200 breaststroke in
2:21.74 — an event that
two-time Olympic cham-
pion and world record
holder Rebecca Soni usu-
ally dominates, but she’s
taking the year off.
Also, Marco Koch of
Germany qualified first in
the men’s 200 breast in
2:09.39 and China led the
women’s 4x200 free relay
in 7:52.50, with Australia
second and the United
States third.
Later on Day 5 of 8
in the pool, finals were
scheduled in the men’s
200 individual medley and
100 free and the women’s
200 butterfly, 50 back
and 4x200 free relay.
The highlight should be
the duel between Olympic
champion Nathan Adrian
and James ‘‘The Missile’’
Magnussen in the 100
free.
Franklin will swim twice
later, in the 100 free semi-
finals and the relay.
For the 100, she has
relatively modest goals.
‘‘If I can make the podi-
um, I will be over the moon
happy,’’ said Franklin, who
was fifth in London. ‘‘I’d be
really, really happy with
a 52. If it puts me on the
podium, that’s awesome. If
it doesn’t, that’s fine too.’’
Rodriguez faces lifetime ban from MLB
By RONALD BLUM
AP Sports Writer
NEW YORK (AP) —
Alex Rodriguez might
not make it back to the
Yankees this year. Or
ever.
Major League Baseball
is threatening to kick
A-Rod out of the game for
life unless the New York
star agrees not to fight
a lengthy suspension for
his role in the sport’s lat-
est drug scandal, accord-
ing to a person familiar
with the discussions.
The person spoke to
The Associated Press on
Wednesday on condition
of anonymity because no
statements were autho-
rized.
W h e t h e r
Commissioner Bud Selig
would actually issue a
lifetime suspension was
unclear and a permanent
ban could be shortened
by arbitrator Fredric
Horowitz to about 200
games, the person said.
The number of players
likely to be disciplined
stood at 14 Wednesday.
Front and center is
Rodriguez, baseball’s
highest-paid player and
the most prominent one
linked in media reports
over the past seven
months to Biogenesis
of America, a closed
Florida anti-aging clinic
that allegedly distributed
banned performance-
enhancing drugs.
The Yankees expected
Rodriguez to be accused of
recruiting other athletes
for the clinic, attempting
to obstruct MLB’s inves-
tigation, and not being
truthful with MLB in the
past. Baseball has con-
sidered suspending him
for violations of its labor
contract and drug agree-
ment.
Even if he is banned
from baseball, there is
precedent for a shortened
penalty: When pitcher
Steve Howe was given a
lifetime ban in 1992 in
his seventh suspension
for drug or alcohol use,
an arbitrator reduced the
penalty to 119 days.
A three-time MVP,
Rodriguez acknowledged
four years ago that he
used performance-
enhancing substances
while with Texas from
2001-03, but repeatedly
has denied using them
since.
He’s been sidelined all
season since hip surgery
in January and then a
quadriceps strain dur-
ing a minor league reha-
bilitation assignment in
July. The Yankees say
he’ll start another rehab
Friday — Double-A
Trenton appeared to be
the likely destination.
‘‘Hopefully Alex will be
back shortly thereafter,’’
Yankees general manager
Brian Cashman said.
Rodriguez didn’t stop
to talk with report-
ers after his workout
Wednesday at the team’s
minor league complex in
Tampa, Fla.
At first, MLB and the
union thought talks on
the Biogenesis probe
could be completed by
Friday, but negotia-
tions to avoid grievances
are likely to push back
announcements until
at least Saturday or
Sunday.
Others accused in
media reports of receiving
performance-enhancing
drugs from Biogenesis
include a trio of 2013 All-
Stars: Texas outfielder
Nelson Cruz, San Diego
shortstop Everth Cabrera
and Detroit shortstop
Jhonny Peralta.
Most of the players face
50-game bans as first
offenders. Both sides felt
an urgency to complete
the process because by
the middle of next week,
teams will have fewer
than 50 games left. And
that would force players
to complete suspensions
during the playoffs or at
the start of next season.
Detroit general man-
ager Dave Dombrowski
protected against a possi-
ble suspension of Peralta
by acquiring slick-field-
ing infielder Jose Iglesias
from Boston in a three-
team trade Tuesday
night.
MLS All-
Star Game
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THE DECATUR DAILY
DEMOCRAT
141 S. SeconJ St. º Decatur, IN º (260) 724-2121
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 2B • Thursday, August 1, 2013
DDD SportS ScoreboarD
National League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 63 45 .583 —
Washington 52 56 .481 11
Philadelphia 50 57 .467 12 1/2
New York 48 57 .457 13 1/2
Miami 41 65 .387 21
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 65 42 .607 —
St. Louis 62 44 .585 2 1/2
Cincinnati 60 49 .550 6
Chicago 49 58 .458 16
Milwaukee 46 62 .426 19 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 57 49 .538 —
Arizona 55 52 .514 2 1/2
Colorado 51 58 .468 7 1/2
San Diego 50 59 .459 8 1/2
San Francisco 47 59 .443 10
———
Tuesday’s Games
Milwaukee 6, Chicago Cubs 5, 1st
game
Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1, 11 innings,
1st game
Philadelphia 7, San Francisco 3
Detroit 5, Washington 1
Tampa Bay 5, Arizona 2
Atlanta 11, Colorado 3
N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 2, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 0, 2nd game
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 2, 2nd
game
San Diego 4, Cincinnati 2
L.A. Dodgers 3, N.Y. Yankees 2
Wednesday’s Games
Detroit 11, Washington 1
Cincinnati 4, San Diego 1
San Francisco 9, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 4
Arizona 7, Tampa Bay 0
Atlanta 9, Colorado 0
Miami 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Chicago Cubs 6, Milwaukee 1
N.Y. Yankees 3, L.A. Dodgers 0
Thursday’s Games
N.Y. Mets (Harvey 8-2) at Miami
(Koehler 2-6), 12:40 p.m.
Arizona (Spruill 0-0) at Texas
(Darvish 9-5), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 6-6) at Phila-
delphia (Hamels 4-13), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Kelly 1-3) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 3-2), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Bettis 0-0) at Atlanta
(Teheran 7-5), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco 6-9) at Chica-
go Cubs (Rusin 1-0), 8:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 9-3) at Chicago
Cubs (T.Wood 7-7), 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 7-10) at Philadelphia
(Cl.Lee 10-4), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 9-5) at Pittsburgh
(Cole 5-4), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at Boston
(Lester 10-6), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (U.Jimenez 8-5) at Miami
(Fernandez 7-5), 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City (W.Davis 5-9) at N.Y.
Mets (Gee 7-8), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-6) at
Tampa Bay (Archer 6-3), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (S.Miller 10-7) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 9-8), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 12-6) at
Milwaukee (Gorzelanny 2-4), 8:10
p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 9-9) at San
Diego (Cashner 7-5), 10:10 p.m.
American League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 65 44 .596 —
Tampa Bay 64 44 .593 1/2
Baltimore 59 49 .546 5 1/2
New York 56 51 .523 8
Toronto 50 57 .467 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 61 45 .575 —
Cleveland 59 48 .551 2 1/2
Kansas City 53 51 .510 7
Minnesota 45 59 .433 15
Chicago 40 65 .381 20 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 63 45 .583 —
Texas 59 49 .546 4
Seattle 50 57 .467 12 1/2
Los Angeles 48 58 .453 14
Houston 36 70 .340 26
———
Tuesday’s Games
Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 4
Baltimore 4, Houston 3
Detroit 5, Washington 1
Tampa Bay 5, Arizona 2
Boston 8, Seattle 2
Texas 14, L.A. Angels 11, 10 innings
Kansas City 7, Minnesota 2
Toronto 5, Oakland 0
L.A. Dodgers 3, N.Y. Yankees 2
Wednesday’s Games
Detroit 11, Washington 1
Toronto 5, Oakland 2, 10 innings
Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 5,
10 innings
Houston 11, Baltimore 0
Arizona 7, Tampa Bay 0
Boston 5, Seattle 4, 15 innings
Texas 2, L.A. Angels 1
Kansas City 4, Minnesota 3
N.Y. Yankees 3, L.A. Dodgers 0
Thursday’s Games
Chicago White Sox (Sale 6-10) at
Cleveland (Masterson 12-7), 12:05
p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 5-7) at Minne-
sota (Diamond 5-9), 1:10 p.m.
Arizona (Spruill 0-0) at Texas
(Darvish 9-5), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 4-4) at Baltimore
(B.Norris 6-9), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 11-4) at Boston
(Dempster 6-8), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (Jo.Johnson 1-7) at L.A.
Angels (Richards 2-4), 10:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Seattle (Harang 5-9) at Baltimore
(Tillman 13-3), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 3-6)
at Detroit (Fister 9-5), 7:08 p.m.
Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at Boston
(Lester 10-6), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (U.Jimenez 8-5) at Miami
(Fernandez 7-5), 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City (W.Davis 5-9) at N.Y.
Mets (Gee 7-8), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-6) at
Tampa Bay (Archer 6-3), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 5-5) at Minnesota
(Deduno 7-4), 8:10 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 4-3) at Oakland
(Milone 9-8), 10:05 p.m.
Toronto (Redmond 1-1) at L.A.
Angels (Hanson 4-2), 10:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 9-9) at San
Diego (Cashner 7-5), 10:10 p.m.
WNBA
By The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Chicago 12 5 .706 —
Atlanta 11 5 .688 1/2
Washington 9 10 .474 4
Indiana 8 9 .471 4
New York 8 11 .421 5
Connecticut 4 12 .250 7 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 14 3 .824 —
Los Angeles 12 6 .667 2 1/2
Phoenix 9 9 .500 5 1/2
Seattle 7 10 .412 7
San Antonio 6 12 .333 8 1/2
Tulsa 6 14 .300 9 1/2
———
Tuesday’s Games
No games scheduled
Wednesday’s Games
New York 88, Washington 78
Thursday’s Games
Indiana at Connecticut, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Tulsa, 8 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Major League Soccer
By The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Sporting KCity 10 6 6 36 31 21
New York 10 7 5 35 33 27
Montreal 10 5 5 35 32 29
Philadelphia 9 6 7 34 33 30
New England 8 7 6 30 27 19
Houston 8 6 6 30 23 20
Chicago 7 9 4 25 25 30
Columbus 6 10 5 23 24 27
Toronto FC 3 10 8 17 19 29
D.C. 2 15 4 10 10 35
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real SaltLake 11 7 4 37 36 24
Portland 8 3 10 34 31 20
Colorado 9 7 7 34 28 24
Los Angeles 10 9 3 33 32 27
Vancouver 9 7 5 32 33 29
FC Dallas 8 5 8 32 27 27
Seattle 8 7 4 28 24 22
San Jose 7 9 6 27 23 33
Chivas USA 4 12 5 17 19 37
NOTE: Three points for victory, one
point for tie.
———
Wednesday’s Games
Roma 3, MLS All-Stars 1
Saturday’s Games
New York at Sporting Kansas City,
6:30 p.m.
Montreal at D.C. United, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Houston, 9 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Chivas USA at San Jose, 10 p.m.
FC Dallas at Seattle FC, 10:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Portland, 11 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Toronto FC at New England, 7:30
p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 10
Seattle FC at Toronto FC, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
New England at Sporting Kansas
City, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 11
Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Chivas USA, 11 p.m.
Wednesday’s Sports Transactions
By The Associated Press
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Sus-
pended Detroit RHP Juan Alcantara
50 games for a violation of the Minor
League Drug Prevention and Treat-
ment Program.
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Placed
RHP Jason Hammel on the 15-day
DL, retroactive to Monday. Reinstat-
ed OF Steve Pearce from the 15-day
DL.
BOSTON RED SOX—Optioned
RHP Brayan Villarreal to Pawtucket
(IL). Recalled INF Brock Holt from
Pawtucket.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Recalled
OF Jordan Danks from Charlotte (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS—Designat-
ed RHP Joe Martinez for assignment.
Optioned RHP Vinnie Pestano to
Columbus (IL).
DETROIT TIGERS—Optioned RHP
Luke Putkonen to Toledo (IL).
Recalled RHP Luis Marte from Tole-
do and placed him on the 15-day DL.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—
Optioned INF Grant Green to Salt
Lake (PCL). Selected the contract of
3B Chris Nelson from Salt Lake
(PCL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Designat-
ed INF Adam Rosales for assign-
ment.
TEXAS RANGERS—Sent LHP
Matt Harrison to Frisco (TL) for a
rehab assignment.
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—
Traded RHP Ian Kennedy to San
Diego for LHP Joe Thatcher, RHP
Matt Stites and a 2014 competitive
balance round B draft pick. Sent RHP
Trevor Cahill to Reno (PCL) for a
rehab assignment. Assigned RHP
Nate Adcock outright to Reno.
ATLANTA BRAVES—Sent OF B.J.
Upton to Gwinnett (IL) for a rehab
assignment. Assigned RHP Kameron
Loe outright to Gwinnett.
CHICAGO CUBS—Optioned RHP
Jake Arrieta to Iowa (PCL).
L.A. DODGERS—Acquired C Drew
Butera from Minnesota for cash or a
player to be named, and optioned
him and INF-OF Elian Herrera to
Albuquerque (PCL). Recalled OF-1B
Scott Van Slyke from Albuquerque.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS—
Optioned INF Scooter Gennett to
Nashville (PCL). Placed RHP Yovani
Gallardo on the 15-day DL.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES—
Released 3B Brandon Inge. Optioned
RHP Brandon Cumpton to Indianapo-
lis (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Optioned
LHP Tyler Lyons to Memphis (PCL).
Placed C Yadier Molina and OF
Shane Robinson on the 15-day DL.
Recalled OF Adron Chambers and
1B/OF Brock Peterson from Memphis
(PCL).
SAN DIEGO PADRES—Sent OF
Cameron Maybin to Tucson (PCL) for
a rehab assignment.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLAS MAVERICKS—Signed G
Devin Harris.
MILWAUKEE BUCKS—Traded G
Brandon Jennings to Detroit for G
Brandon Knight, F Khris Middleton
and C Viacheslav Kravtsov.
OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER—
Named Robert Pack and Mike Terp-
stra assistant coaches.
WASHINGTON WIZARDS—
Agreed to terms with G John Wall on
a contract extension.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS—Signed DB Don
Unamba.
DALLAS COWBOYS—Released
DT Ikponmwosa Igbinosun. Signed
DE Toby Jackson.
DENVER BRONCOS—Agreed to
terms with OL Ryan Lilja.
MIAMI DOLPHINS—Re-signed
WRs Julius Pruitt and Keenan Davis.
Placed WRs Armon Binns and Jas-
per Collins on the waived-injured list.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—
Released WRs Perez Ashford and
Lavelle Hawkins and OL Nick
McDonald.
OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed DT
Myles Wade.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Signed
QB Nathan Enderle.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CALGARY FLAMES—Signed D
T.J. Brodie to a two-year contract.
FLORIDA PANTHERS—Signed C
Scott Gomez to a one-year contract.
LOS ANGELES KINGS—Named
Sean O’Donnell manager of fan
development and alumni relations.
NEW YORK ISLANDERS—
Announced an affiliation agreement
with Stockton (ECHL).
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
COLORADO RAPIDS—Released F
Kevin Harbottle.
National Women’s Soccer League
WASHINGTON SPIRIT—Signed D
Marisa Abegg.
COLLEGE
AMERICAN SOUTHWEST CON-
FERENCE—Announced the addition
of UC Santa Cruz as an affiliate
member for women’s golf.
BARUCH—Named Christina Pierre
women’s interim volleyball coach.
CALDWELL—Named Mike Molina-
ro trainer.
EAST TENNESSEE STATE—
Named Teddy Gaines assistant foot-
ball coach.
FAIRFIELD—Signed women’s bas-
ketball coach Joe Frager to a con-
tract extension through the 2016-17
season.
GEORGIA TECH—Announced the
resignation of director of football
operations Jason Snider.
AS Roma topples
MLS All-Stars, 3-1
By DAVE SKRETTA
AP Sports Writer
KANSAS CITY, Kan.
(AP) — A raucous crowd
packed into one of Major
League Soccer’s glitzy new
stadiums to watch a team
comprised of its best play-
ers on a picturesque late-
summer night.
All that was missing
was the outcome fans
desired.
Italian powerhouse
AS Roma, led by long-
time star Francesco Totti,
scored 4 minutes into the
game Wednesday night,
then added two second-
half goals to rout a team
of MLS All-Stars 3-1 and
dampen what had been a
festive celebration of soc-
cer in Kansas City.
Kevin Strootman and
Alessandro Florenzi
each had a goal and an
assist, and Junior Tallo
also scored for Roma, the
three-time Serie A cham-
pions. Omar Gonzalez of
the Los Angeles Galaxy
scored the only goal for
the MLS side in second-
half stoppage time.
‘‘Every time you step
inside the white lines you
want to win, but I don’t
think the result was the
focus,’’ said MLS coach
Peter Vermes. ‘‘When you
look at the overall picture
of what transpired the last
few days, it was a great
opportunity.’’
The MLS had been
7-2-1 against internation-
al opponents since the
league adopted the cur-
rent All-Star game format,
the only losses coming to
English Premier League
club Manchester United.
Maybe it’ll think twice
about inviting Italy’s top
teams.
‘‘You give these guys a
half-second or a half-step
and you’re not all together
after one training session,
it’s tough,’’ MLS defender
Matt Besler said. ‘‘These
guys are world class.’’
Most of a sellout crowd
had barely found its seats
at Sporting Park, the $200
million home of Sporting
KC, when Florenzi sent a
pass ahead to Strootman.
Sporting KC defender
Aurelien Collin recovered
to get his foot on the ball,
but Strootman still man-
aged to guide it into the
net.
‘‘Roma is a very, very
good team,’’ Collin said. ‘‘I
think we could have done
better. When it’s an exhi-
bition game, maybe some
don’t take it seriously.
Me? I took it seriously.’’
The early goal took
much of the zip out of the
home crowd, which had
been feverishly waving
flags and pounding drums
during its second All-Star
game in two years. Major
League Baseball staged
its Midsummer Classic
just across the state line
at the Royals’ Kauffman
Stadium last July.
The two second-half
goals by Roma only served
to seal a joyless night for
the MLS during an oth-
erwise positive period of
growth and progress.
Stadiums are in the
works for D.C. United
and San Jose, and an
expansion club will start
play in New York in 2015.
The Columbus Crew were
sold to ambitious new
owners earlier this week,
and Commissioner Don
Garber announced at
halftime Wednesday night
that four expansion fran-
chises will begin play by
the 2020 season, bringing
the total number of teams
in the league to 24.
There’s perhaps no bet-
ter example of how far
the league has come than
Kansas City, which once
played its games before
a few thousand fans in
cavernous Arrowhead
Stadium.
The team was sold to
local owners in 2006, and
they embarked on a dra-
matic rebranding of the
franchise formerly known
as the Wizards. They
spearheaded the construc-
tion of one of the most
glamorous soccer-specific
stadiums in the country,
built a feverish fan base
and became one of the
most successful teams on
the field — the club has
won two straight Eastern
Conference titles.
It was little surprise that
Kansas City was awarded
this year’s All-Star game,
and even less of a surprise
that there was plenty of
hometown flavor through-
out the night.
Not only was the MLS
side led by Sporting KC’s
Vermes, the coach also
included three of his own
in the starting lineup.
Collin was joined by for-
ward Graham Zusi and
fellow defender Besler, who
helped the U.S. national
team win the CONCACAF
Gold Cup over the week-
end.
Hingis returns to tennis
By KEVI N
SCATTAREGGIA
Associated Press
CARLSBAD, Calif.
(AP) — Martina Hingis
won in her return to the
WTA Tour, teaming with
Daniela Hantuchova for a
6-1, 6-1 victory over Julia
Goerges and Darija Jurak
on Wednesday night in the
Southern California Open.
Hingis, the 32-year-old
former top-ranked singled
player whose last tour
match was September
2007, consistently showed
the deft hands that made
her a nine-time Grand
Slam doubles champion
before a sparse crowd that
gave her a warm ovation
when she was introduced.
Hingis didn’t touch the
ball until the fifth point of
the match but flashed her
doubles talent when she
hit a backhand volley right
at Jurak for a point in the
second game.
The five-time Grand
Slam singles champion
frequently flashed a smile
as she and Hantuchova
overwhelmed their oppo-
nents. The pair hugged
after Hingis’ lob shot over
Jurak’s head sealed the
first-round match.
Hingis is scheduled
to play doubles with
Hantuchova in four tour-
naments, including the
U.S. Open.
Hingis has retired twice
previously, the first time
in early 2003 at 22 and
the last time in November
2007.
In singles, Ana Ivanovic
advanced to the second
round by beating defend-
ing champion Dominika
Cibulkova 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.
The seventh-seeded
Ivanovic, from Serbia,
won nine of the final 11
games. She used a strong
ground game to overpow-
er Cibulkova, the Slovak
player coming off a victory
Sunday in the Bank of the
West Classic at Stanford.
‘‘As soon as the draw
came out I thought it was
one of the toughest first-
round matches, especially
being a seeded player,’’ said
Ivanovic, the former top-
ranked singles player and
2008 French Open champ.
Top-seeded Victoria
Azarenka of Belarus
beat Italy’s Francesca
Schiavone 6-2, 6-3 in the
second round. Azarenka
was playing her first match
since withdrawing from
her second-round match
at Wimbledon because of
knee and hip injuries.
Ivanovic, who fired
coach Nigel Sears after
her second-round loss at
Wimbledon, said she has
been working on ‘‘being
consistent and also work-
ing on that confidence
part. I think it plays a big
role. I felt like my game
has been there at times
but not my confidence.’’
Martin boosts Pirates past Cardinals, 5-4
PITTSBURGH (AP) —
Russell Martin drove home
Neal Walker with the go-
ahead run in the eighth
inning and the Pittsburgh
Pirates rallied to beat the
St. Louis Cardinals 5-4
Wednesday night.
Martin’s sharp ground-
er off Trevor Rosenthal
(1-2) rolled into left field,
giving Walker enough time
to score from second. The
Pirates’ fourth straight win
over the Cardinals gave
Pittsburgh a 2 1/2-game
lead in the NL Central.
Tony Watson (3-1)
worked two shutout
innings in relief. Mark
Melancon pitched a perfect
ninth for his fifth save.
Matt Holliday had three
hits and drove in two runs,
and the Cardinals’ strug-
gling offense put together
13 hits.
REDS 4, PADRES 1
SAN DIEGO (AP) —
Homer Bailey came with-
in two outs of a five-hit
shutout to end his four-
start losing streak and
Cincinnati beat San Diego
to snap a five-game skid.
Brandon Phillips hom-
ered and Joey Votto hit
a two-run double for the
Reds, who avoided a three-
game sweep and ended the
Padres’ four-game winning
streak.
Bailey had allowed
just five singles going into
the ninth, when Everth
Cabrera reached on a field-
ing error by first baseman
Votto leading off the inning.
The right-hander got Chris
Denorfia to fly out before
Chase Headley doubled in
Cabrera. Manager Dusty
Baker pulled Bailey, and
Aroldis Chapman got the
final two outs for his 25th
save in 29 chances.
Bailey (6-10) allowed
six hits and one unearned
run, struck out seven and
walked none.
Phillips homered to
center field off lefty Eric
Stults (8-10) leading off
the second, his 13th.
CUBS 6, BREWERS 1
CHICAGO (AP) — Edwin
Jackson pitched eight solid
innings, David DeJesus
drove in three runs and
Chicago beat Milwaukee
to salvage the finale of the
four-game series.
Anthony Rizzo hit a
two-run homer and Starlin
Castro belted a solo shot
as Chicago closed out a
14-13 July, its first win-
ning calendar month since
it went 15-10 last July.
Rizzo went deep in the
third, driving a 3-1 pitch
from Wily Peralta (7-11)
over the wall in center for
his 15th homer — match-
ing his career high set a
year ago. Castro connect-
ed an inning later, making
it 3-0 with a drive to the
bleachers in left.
Jackson (7-11) struck
out four and walked none.
The right-hander finished
July with a 3-1 record and
a 1.83 ERA in five starts.
INDIANS 6, WHITE
SOX 5, 10 INNINGS
CLEVELAND (AP) —
Carlos Santana’s leadoff
home run in the 10th
inning sent the Cleveland
Indians over the Chicago
White Sox for their sev-
enth straight win.
Santana hit a 3-2 pitch
from Dylan Axelrod (3-7)
into the right field seats for
Cleveland’s ninth walkoff
win of the season.
Chris Perez (4-1) hit
Adam Dunn with a pitch
with two outs in the
10th, but struck out Paul
Konerko to end the inning
as Chicago lost its sixth
straight game.
TIGERS 11, NATS 1
DETROIT (AP) — Alex
Avila and Torii Hunter hit
homers in a five-run sec-
ond inning and the Detroit
Tigers scored five more
runs in the fourth inning
while routing Washington.
The AL Central-leading
Tigers swept the two-game
series. They have won five
straight, the latest victory
coming while star Miguel
Cabrera was out of the
lineup, a day after aggra-
vating an injury.
Justin Verlander (11-8)
shook off a shaky start by
giving up one run, four hits
and five walks while strik-
ing out six in six innings.
Gio Gonzalez (7-4) gave
up 10 runs — one short
of his career high — and
11 hits — the most of
his career — over 3 1-3
innings.
Decatur Daily Democrat
Thursday, August 1, 2013 • Page 3B
News Briefs
RE-DEDICATION CEREMONY
Saturday, August 24, 2013 2:30 pm
Guest Speakers - Military Salute - History
All donations and proceeds from the sale of 100th Anniversary Souvenirs
will be used to bring the Monument back to its original design that
featured a waterfall fountain on the nothside and also to build the
Veterans Wall of Peace in the lawn between the Courthouse
and the Peace Monument.
e Waterfall Fountain
Veterans Wall of Peace
Bricks are available to all Adams County Veterans
4”x 8” $70 - 8”x 8” bricks $135
Forms are available at the Adams County Treasurers Oce
Monument Souvenir Sellers and on-line.
www.adamscountypeacemonument.com
100th Anniversary Souvenirs
BRONZE COIN
100 YEAR HISTORY BOOK
SOUVENIR SELLERS
BERNE - FAITH & LIFE BOOKS AND GIFTS
DECATUR - THE HOMEPLACE
RITTER’S FLOWERS & GIFTS
YVONNE MARIE’S ANTQUE MALL
GENEVA- ADAMS PUBLIC LIBRARY GENEVA BRANCH
MONROE - SHAKA SHACK COFFEE & MORE
THE ADAMS COUNTY PEACE MONUMENT
is the rst monument in the United States
dedicated solely to peace.
It features the names of Adams County Veterans from
e Revolutionary War, e War of 1812, e Civil War
e Mexican War & e Spanish American War.
It was dedicated October 30, 1913.
Dallas. A police dashcam video released Wednesday
shows an officer interacting with Zimmerman and
letting him go with a warning.
The officer, who was not identified, asks
Zimmerman, ‘‘Where you headed this weekend?’’
After an unintelligible response, the officer asks,
‘‘Nowhere in particular? Why you say that?’’
‘‘You didn’t see my name?’’ Zimmerman replies.
No decision on Gee’s office
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio State University’s
trustee chairman says no decision has been made on
an office for retired president Gordon Gee (ghee).
Bobby Schottenstein gave the update Wednesday
as he shot down reports that the university would
construct a $190,000 office suite for Gee and an
assistant. Schottenstein said a suitable office will
be found for Gee with the goal being to use existing
space.
Gee will remain a tenured professor in the univer-
sity’s Moritz College of Law as part of his retirement
package.
University spokesman Gary Lewis says the plan
for an office suite in Page Hall was a proposal that
hasn’t been finalized.
Paroled O.J. not leaving prison
CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — O.J. Simpson won a
small victory Wednesday in his bid for freedom as
Nevada granted him parole on some of his 2008 con-
victions for kidnapping and armed robbery involving
the holdup of two sports memorabilia dealers at a
Las Vegas hotel room.
But the decision doesn’t mean the 66-year-old
Simpson will be leaving prison anytime soon. The for-
mer NFL star was convicted on multiple charges and
still faces at least four more years behind bars on
sentences that were ordered to run consecutively.
The Nevada Board of Parole Commissioners
released its decision in favor of Simpson’s parole
request. Commissioners noted Simpson’s ‘‘positive
institutional record’’ and his participation in pro-
grams addressing ‘‘behavior that led to incarcera-
tion.’’
The board noted Simpson had no previous crimi-
nal convictions and still has consecutive sentences to
serve in the Las Vegas case.
Rowling accepts apology, donation
LONDON (AP) — Author J.K. Rowling accepted an
apology and a charitable donation Wednesday from
a law firm which revealed she wrote a crime novel
under a pseudonym.
The ‘‘Harry Potter’’ author was exposed by a news-
paper on July 14 as the author of ‘‘The Cuckoo’s
Calling,’’ a thriller ostensibly written by former sol-
dier and first-time novelist Robert Galbraith. The
book was published in April to good reviews but mod-
est sales, and there was speculation that Rowling or
her publisher had leaked the news to raise the book’s
profile.
But the law firm Russells, which has done work
for Rowling, acknowledged that one of its partners
had let the information slip to his wife’s best friend.
Gays marrying in Minnesota
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Dozens of gay couples
began tying the knot early Thursday morning at
Minneapolis City Hall as Minnesota became the lat-
est state to legalize same-sex marriage.
‘‘I didn’t expect to cry quite that hard,’’ said a
beaming Cathy ten Broeke, who with Margaret Miles
was the first gay couple to be wed at City Hall.
After Miles and ten Broeke exchanged vows and
rings just before midnight Wednesday, Minneapolis
Mayor R.T. Rybak had musicians kill a few minutes
until the clock struck 12:01 a.m. Thursday, when the
law went into effect.
Then the attending crowd burst into applause as
Rybak pronounced Miles and ten Broeke married.
The couple stood nearby embracing their 5-year-old
son, Louie.
Decades of LA priest abuse detailed
LOS ANGELES (AP) — In therapy sessions, the
priest confessed the shocking details he’d kept hid-
den for years: He had molested more than 100 boys,
including his 5-year-old brother. He had sex with
male prostitutes, and frequented gay strip clubs.
The admissions of the Rev. Ruben Martinez are
included among nearly 2,000 pages of secret files
unsealed Wednesday that were kept on priests,
brothers and nuns who belonged to religious orders
but were accused of child molestation while working
within the Los Angeles archdiocese.
The papers, which were released under the terms
of a $660 million settlement agreement reached in
2007, are the first glimpse at what religious orders
knew about the men and women they posted in
Roman Catholic schools and parishes in the Los
Angeles area.
The documents cover five different religious orders
that employed 10 priests or religious brothers and
two nuns who were all accused in civil lawsuits of
molesting children. Among them, the accused had 21
alleged victims between the 1950s and the 1980s.
Lower student loan rates coming
WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan bill that would
lower the costs of borrowing for millions of students
is awaiting President Barack Obama’s signature.
The House on Wednesday gave final congressional
approval to legislation that links student loan inter-
est rates to the financial markets. The bill would offer
lower rates for most students now but higher rates
down the line if the economy improves as expected.
For the moment, the focus was on the class of stu-
dents signing loans for classes this fall.
The measure passed 392-31.
Weiner opponent in big demand
NEW YORK (AP) — Mayoral hopeful Christine
Quinn suddenly finds herself in demand on national
political television talk shows, and they all want to
ask her the same question: Should Anthony Weiner
drop out of the race?
Quinn, the pugnacious City Council speaker who
has now vaulted ahead of the former congressman in
the wake of his latest sexting scandal, answers ques-
tions about her embattled rival the same way: She
touts her own track record while carefully disparag-
ing his ‘‘pattern of reckless behavior.’’
But, unlike other Democratic rivals, Quinn has
always stopped short of calling for Weiner to bow out.
Truth is, she may not want him to go anywhere.
Weiner’s recent travails have ended up giving
Quinn much more valuable media exposure, allowing
her to portray herself as the ‘‘adult’’ in the race and
contrast her leadership to her married rival’s sordid
behavior
Origin of outbreak remains a mystery
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nearly 400 people across
the country have been sickened by cyclospora, a
lengthy intestinal illness usually contracted by eating
contaminated food. But if you’re looking to find out
exactly where it came from, you may be out of luck.
Federal officials warned Wednesday that it was too
early to say whether the outbreak of the rare parasite
reported in at least 15 states was over.
Health officials in Nebraska and Iowa say they’ve
traced cases there to prepackaged salad. They
haven’t revealed the company that packaged the
salad or where it was sold, explaining only that most
if not all of it wasn’t grown locally.
The lack of information has fueled concern from
consumers and food safety advocates who argue that
companies should be held accountable when out-
breaks happen.
Official: Nothing criminal in explosion
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Federal and state inves-
tigators trying to determine what caused a series of
explosions at a central Florida propane plant said
Wednesday they’ve uncovered nothing that indicates
a crime was committed.
Investigators have inspected the Blue Rhino plant’s
5-acre property and also interviewed some workers
who were at the plant when a fireball erupted in a
lot outside the plant’s two warehouses, said Maj.
Brandon Ball of the Division of State Fire Marshal.
They have been unable to interview some of the
eight workers who were injured, four critically, from
the explosions due to their injuries, he said.
Investigators aren’t ready to publicly say where the
fire began or what caused it, Ball said, but he added
that there was nothing to indicate the fire started
inside the warehouses where propane canisters for
gas grills are refurbished and filled.
Zimmerman stopped for speeding
FORNEY, Texas (AP) — George Zimmerman, the
neighborhood watch volunteer who was cleared of
all charges in the Florida shooting death of unarmed
teenager Trayvon Martin, was stopped for speeding
on a highway near Dallas, officials said Wednesday.
Forney police stopped Zimmerman on Sunday
as he drove west on U.S. 80, about 20 miles east of
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NOW HIRING IN
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Route Sales
Representative
6HDVRQDO2I¿FH*UDLQ
(OHYDWRU2SHUDWLRQDQG
3$577,0(SRVLWLRQV
available at
7UXSRLQWH&RRSHUDWLYH
Please send resume or
apply in person at
Edgerton (1519 Everson
Rd., Woodburn, IN 46797) or
Monroeville (306 W. South St.,
Monroevi||e, lÑ 46773) offces.
3DUWV&RXQWHU5HSUHVHQWDWLYH
6HUYLFH7HFKQLFLDQ
WANTED:
E Full Time
E Health Insurance
E 401K Plan
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Adoption
A LIFETIME OF
laughter & happi-
ness awaits your
child. Happily mar-
ried, financially sta-
ble couple looking
to adopt. Please
call Jason & Sheila
(800)494-5978. Ex-
penses paid.
ADOPT Hoping to
share our hearts
and home with a
newborn baby.
Loving, nurturing
home for your
baby. Expenses
paid. Married cou-
ple, Walt/Gina
1-800-315-6957
ADOPTION
Young, happily
married couple
wishing for new-
born. Love, affec-
tion, security and
opportunities await
your baby. Ex-
penses paid.
Please call
Jillian/David any-
time 800-571-3763
ADOPTION: DE-
VOTED FAMILY
PROMISES to
Cherish Your Child
Unconditionally. Fi-
nancially secure;
expenses paid.
Your Child is Al-
ready Loved in Our
Hearts! Selena &
Steve
1-866-877-4737
www.selenaand-
steveadopt.com
Auction
Real Estate
Absolute Internet
Auction35 Real Es-
tate Properties Bid-
ding Ends: August
8- 2pm INProp-
ertyAuctions.com
Jimmie Dean Cof-
fey, Tim Ellis Real-
tors 812-824-6000
Lic #AC30200042
Seller: Jones Es-
tate
Automotives
For Sale
GUARANTEED
TOP DOLLAR
FOR JUNK CARS,
TRUCKS & VANS
CALL JACK @
260-466-8689
GUARANTEED
TOP DOLLARS
FOR JUNK CARS,
TRUCKS & VANS
CALL JACK @
260-466-8689
Farmer’s
Market/
Seeds
SWEET
CORN--Fresh
picked, locally
grown, bi-color,
non-GMO.
Call 260-437-0504
Taking orders for
raspberries and
blackberries.
Please visit:
L&M Produce
879 E 300 N
Decatur, IN
Wanted: Fruit &
vegetable vendors
for das Marit Farm-
ers Market in
Berne. Call
589-2936
Lawn Garden
Here at JB Land-
scaping we are
here to help with all
your yard needs.
We offer quality
work with reason-
able prices. With
our grass cuts we
offer trimming and
edging all in one
price. All seniors,
veterans, and ac-
tive duty receive a
25% discount.. Call
Jeremy Adams at
260-458-4293 for
free estimate
Apartments
For Rent
1 bedroom apart-
ment, utilities in-
cluded, $400.00
per mo plus de-
posit, No Pets
728-9957 Must
have references
IMMEDIATE OC-
CUPANCY with ap-
proved application.
Rental assistance
may be available.
Country Brook
apartments have 1
& 2 bedrooms with
on-site laundry and
24 hour emergency
maintenance. Call
260-724-
4616/TDD#
800-743-3333 or
stop by our rental
office at 522 S 13th
St. in Decatur.
EHO
Mobile Homes
For Rent
Nice small mobile
home,
washer/dryer, appli-
ances, water/sew-
age, trash removal,
shed included.
$300mo. NO
PETS
260-223-1383
Miscellaneous
For Sale
NOTICE!
My store has 20%
off in case some
stores want to ad to
theirs or start a
new store.
Hours are:
Tues-Fri 8-5
Sat 8-3
Closed Monday
We have lots of
coats, pants,
dishes, stainless
steel, gifts, hats,
shoes, material,
toys, dinnerware
sets, lots of crystal
dishes-such as wa-
ter & wine sets &
clocks, etc.
Eicher Fabrics
4629 CR 68
Spencerville, IN
46788
Household/
Furniture
For Sale
Brand NEW in
plastic!
QUEEN
PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET
Can deliver, $125.
(260) 493-0805
Keller solid oak
dining room table,
6 chairs, china
hutch and china
cabinet. $2,000.00
Call 260-223-0085
Building
Supplies
For Sale
Roofing- Half
Priced: Economy
Dimensional Shin-
gles $54 per sq, In-
terior Doors $5 &
up, Wood Interior
Trim 50% off.
www.Cardwell-
HomeCenter.com,
3205 Madison Ave-
nue, Indianapolis
(317) 788-0008
Garage Sale
1027 Woodridge
Dr
Fri 8/2 9-5
Sat 8/3 9-12
Heavy wooden
ramps, wine cooler,
boys clothes-12/2t,
adult clothes, toys,
changing table, lots
of misc, gold clubs,
tv’s, Christmas
items
103 Brandywine
Lane
Friday Aug 2 8-4
Puzzles, 3 wheel
bike, girls twin size
bed frame, girls
and boys clothes
size m-l, ladies and
mens clothes size
l-xl, microwave,
poker table top,
books
1128 W Jackson
St ( behind KFC)
Fri-Sat 8-?
Infant-large size,
bikes, toys, toddler
bed w/ mattress,
car seats, crafts,
Vera Bradley
2875 W 300 N
Fri 8-5 Sat 8-12
Infant to size 7
girls clothes, junior
to adult large
clothes, toys, home
decor, collectibles,
50” big screen tv,
microwave, day-
bed, bedding, chil-
drens books,
Pfaltzgraff dishes,
dolls, Boyds Bears
4 Family Garage
Sale 615 N 5th St
Thur 8/1 3-6 Fri 8/2
8-5 Sat 8/3 8-1
Wedding items,
baby clothes, furni-
ture, Fisher Price
toys, party lite, bi-
cycles, tv
415 Bollman St
Fri Aug 2nd 8-6
Sat Aug 3rd 8-12
Teen girls and
youth boys clothes,
craft stamps, de-
cor, lots of misc.
Garage Sale
5576 N 300 E
(Piqua Rd south
past Lake Shores,
1st rural rd, left, 1/2
mile) Fri 5-7 Sat 8-1
Namebrand, boys
3t-7, girls 8-1 girls
tap/ballet items,
womens 7-12, Lit-
tle Tykes, Fisher
Price toys, Littlest
Pet Shop, Ethan
Allen head/foot
board, golf clubs,
custom wheels, bar
stools, home decor,
new items added
6206 N 400 W
Fri 9-5 Sat 9-12
Multi-family garage
sale, Preble near
Fire station.
Dishes, corner tv
cabinet, kitchen ta-
ble & cabinet, puz-
zles, dvd’s and
much more
703 N 10th St
Inside House Sale
Fri 8-5 Sat 8-4
Kids-adult name-
brand clothes, back
to school clothes,
lots of good stuff,
must see
9233 N 200 E Fri-
Sat 8-5 Old saddle,
wood tools, hand
tools, household
items, clothes,
paintings and more
August 2 & 3 9-1
1858 E 900 N De-
catur Wedding-
votives,
centerpieces, lan-
terns, bedspreads,
bedding, dorm
fridge, household
items, antiques,
oak settee & 2
chairs, womens
size 6-xxl, mens
size 32-40, boys
3-6 mo to 3yrs &
7-8 & 10’s, books,
purses- vera brad-
ley, elliptical ma-
chine, boys bike &
scooter, holiday
items, lots
more--this is the
one you have been
waiting for!!
We’ve added alot
more items and
lowered prices.
Jewelry, bears,
toys, several small
appliances, lots of
Kraft items, lots of
misc. Willshire
beside post office.
Friday 9-5
Saturday-Sunday
10-2
216 S 8th St
Aug 2nd 9-2
Aug 3rd 8-11No
early sales Fiesta
dishes, end
table, coffee table,
bookcases, gas
grill, 2 air mat-
tresses, treadmill &
weight bench, ste-
reo w/larger
speakers, clothes
and lots
more.Priced to sell
Yard Sale
428 S 1st St
Thursday-Saturday
9am-5pm
Found
Found--friendly or-
ange and white kit-
ten at Hanna Nutt-
man park. Call
260-580-2844 or
260-724-3400
Childcare
Needed
Child care needed
for 10 year old
special needs boy
of single parent. Af-
ter school care and
full time when not
in school, pay is
flexible. Call
702-338-9753
Employment
Wanted
Wanted-construc-
tion work,
interior-exterior re-
modeling, roofing,
siding, windows
and doors, restore
old barns, concrete
Reasonable rates
260-440-7140
leave message
General
Help Wanted
Can You Dig It?
Heavy Equipment
Operator Training!
3 Weeks Hands On
Program. Bulldoz-
ers, Backhoes, Ex-
cavators. Lifetime
Job Placement As-
sistance. National
Certifications. VA
Benefits Eligible.
1-866-362-6497
AC1213
Can You Dig It?
Heavy Equipment
Operator Training!
3 Weeks Hands On
Program. Bulldoz-
ers, Backhoes, Ex-
cavators. Lifetime
Job Placement As-
sistance. National
Certifications. VA
Benefits Eligible.
1-866-362-6497
Experienced cook
needed. Work with
a great team. Apply
within: Back 40
Junction
Immediate Open-
ing for Full Time
Laborer for Local
Construction Com-
pany.
Must be 18 years
of age to apply.
Benefits include:
401(K) Plan, Paid
Vacation, Paid
Holidays, Group In-
surance.
Must be able to
pass drug screen-
ing.
CDL not required
but would be bene-
ficial.
Wages based
upon experience.
Females and mi-
norities encour-
aged to apply.
An equal opportu-
nity employer.
This company will
not discriminate
against any appli-
cant for employ-
ment because of
race, sex, religion,
color, national ori-
gin, age or disabil-
ity.
Please reply to:
Decatur Daily
Democrat
File #113
141 S. 2nd St.
Decatur, IN 46733
NAPA AUTO
PARTS
CHAIN--seeking
experienced Auto-
motive Parts
Counter people
and delivery driv-
ers. Email resume
to: shiser@rideg-
company.com or
call 260-459-1654,
ext. 244. (A)
General
Help Wanted
Reporter
The Deca-
tur Daily Democrat
is seeking an en-
thusiastic and hard
working general as-
signment reporter
for Adams County.
This is a fulltime
entry level position.
Responsibilities will
include writing
news and general
feature stories,
coverage of as-
signed beat. You
must possess
strong writing and
photography skills.
Have some pagina-
tion experience us-
ing InDesign.
Knowledge of AP
style a plus. Send
Resume and writ-
ing samples to Ron
Storey, publisher,
Decatur Daily
Democrat, 141 S.
2nd Street, Deca-
tur, IN. 46733 or
Email to: pub-
lisher@decatur-
dailydemocrat.com
The Boys & Girls
Club of Adams
County, Decatur
Unit, is now accept-
ing applications for
a part-time posi-
tion. Ability to work
with youth on
homework and
other educational
programming. Ap-
plicants must have
a high school di-
ploma. Applications
can be submitted to
the Decatur Club.
WANTED: LIFE
AGENTS; Earn
$500 a day; Great
Agent Benefits;
Commissions Paid
Daily; Liberal Un-
derwriting; Leads,
Leads, Leads. LIFE
INSURANCE, LI-
CENSE RE-
QUIRED.
1-888-713-6020
Medical/Denta
l
Help Wanted
OSSIAN HEALTH
& REHAB--is look-
ing for compassion-
ate and dedicated
LPN/RNs. Full or
part time. 2-years
long term care ex-
perience preferred.
Please come expe-
rience our friendly
environment and
ask about our
BENEFIT package.
Please apply within
at 215 Davis Road,
Ossian, IN 46777.
For questions
please call
260-622-7821 and
ask for Jennifer
Price (DON). (A)
Drivers
Help Wanted
25 DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
TMC Transporta-
tion. Earn $800 per
week! Local 15 day
CDL training. TMC
can cover costs.
1-877-649-3156
ATTENTION RE-
GIONAL & DEDI-
CATED DRIVERS!
Averitt offers Excel-
lent Benefits and
Hometime. CDL-A
req. 888-362-8608,
Recent Grads w/a
CDL-A 1-5/wks
Paid Training. Ap-
ply online at Aver-
ittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer
CDL Driver
needed for full/part
time position.
Auger Feed trailer,
no bags, 100 mile
radius, flexible
hours. Paid mile-
age, drops, deten-
tion time.
Call 260-414-7003
CDL-A Drivers:
Hiring experienced
company drivers
and owner opera-
tors. Solo and
teams. Competitive
pay package.
Sign-on incentives.
Call 888-705-3217
or apply online at
www.drivenctrans.c
om
DRIVE A
REEFER? DRIVE
MAVERICK! MAV-
ERICK’S NEW
REEFER DIVISION
IS NOW HIRING IN
YOUR AREA!! Exp
drivers or students
with Class A-CDL
for training. Brand
new equipment, 1st
year average
$39-$47K depend-
ing on experience.
Highest mileage
pay in industry plus
pay for perform-
ance incentives. All
with the best name
in trucking. Must be
21yrs old & hold
Class A-CDL.
1-800-289-1100
www.drivemaver-
ick.com
Drivers
Help Wanted
DRIVER TRAIN-
EES NEEDED
NOW at Stevens
Transport! New
drivers earn $750
per week. No CDL?
No Problem! CDL
& Job Ready in 15
days.
1-877-649-9611
Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
Learn to drive for
US Xpress! Earn
$800+ per week!
No experience
needed!
CDL-Trained and
Job-Ready in 15
days!
1-800-882-7364
Driver Trainees
Needed Now!
Learn to drive for
US Xpress at TD!
New Drivers earn
$800/per week
& Full Benefits!
No experience
needed!
CDL & Job Ready
in just 3 weeks!
DRIVERS CAN
GET
HOME NIGHTLY
IN NORTHERN
INDIANA!
1-800-882-7364
U.S. XPRESS
SERVICE THAT
MATTERS
DRIVEN BY INNO-
VATION
Drivers-CDL-A WE
NEED TRUCK
Drivers. No Gim-
micks! Solos up to
.38cents/mile.
.50cents/mile for
Hazmat Teams.
Call a Recruiter
TODAY!
800-942-2140
www.TotaIMS.com
Drivers: Training,
Class A-CDL. Train
and work for us!
Professional and
focused training for
your Class A-CDL.
You choose be-
tween Company
Driver, Owner Op-
erator, Lease Op-
erator or Lease
Trainer. (877)
369-7203
www.centraltruck-
drivingjobs.com
Flatbed Drivers
New Pay Scale-
Start @ .37cpm.
Up to .04cpm Mile-
age Bonus. Home
Weekends. Insur-
ance and 401K.
Apply @ Boyand-
sons.com
800-648-9915
Drivers
Help Wanted
Get more home
time on Transport
American’s re-
gional runs. Great
miles, equipment +
extras. Enjoy
Transport Ameri-
ca’s great driver ex-
perience! Tadriv-
ers.com or
866-204-0648
GORDON TRUCK-
ING- CDL-A Driv-
ers Needed! Up to
$4,000 Sign On
Bonus! Starting
Pay Up to .46 cpm.
Full Benefits, Ex-
cellent Hometime,
No East Coast. Call
7 days/wk! Team-
GTI.com
888-757-2003.
OWNER OPERA-
TORS Flex Fleet.
14-21 days out.
$3,500 gross
weekly. Weekly
settlements.
Class-A CDL & 1yr
experience. Dis-
count plans for ma-
jor medical & more.
Fleet Owners Wel-
come. Call Matt
TODAY!
866-915-3912
DriveForGreatwide.
com
Part-time Week-
end CDL Class A
Driver Wanted.
Multiple weekend
routes available,
competitive pay.
Please contact us
at 260-353-1050.
Based in Bluffton.
“Partners in Excel-
lence” OTR Drivers
APU Equipped
Pre-Pass EZ-pass
passenger policy.
2012 & Newer
equipment. 100%
NO touch. Butler
Transport
1-800-528-7825
Drivers
Help Wanted
RECENTLY LAID
OFF? IN A RUT?
WERNER NEEDS
DRIVERS! Train to
be a professional
truck driver in
ONLY 16 DAYS!
The avg. truck
driver earns
$700+wk*! Get
CDL Training
w/Roadmaster! Ap-
proved for Veter-
ans Training. Don’t
Delay, Call Today!
1-866-205-1569
*DOL/BLS 2012
AC-0205
Services
AIRLINE CA-
REERS begin
here- Get FAA ap-
proved Aviation
Tech training. Fi-
nancial aid if quali-
fied. Job placement
assistance. CALL
Aviation Institute of
Maintenance
877-523-5807
www.FixJets.com
AC0190
DirecTV- Over 140
channels only
$29.99 a month.
Call Now! Triple
savings! $636.00 in
Savings, Free up-
grade to Genie &
2013 NFL Sunday
ticket free!! Start
saving today!
1-800-246-2073
DISH TV Retailer-
Starting at
$19.99/month (for
12 mos.) & High
Speed Internet
starting at
$14.95/month
(where available.)
SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Instal-
lation! CALL Now!
1-800-283-0560
CA$H FOR
CARS/TRUCKS:
Get A Top Dollar
INSTANT Offer!
Running or Not.
Damaged?
Wrecked? OK! We
Pay Up To
$20,000!
Call Toll Free:
1-800-871-9712
State Line Auto
Parts always pays
top dollar for your
unwanted cars,
trucks, machinery,
and cub cadet
lawn-mowers! Call
724-3874
Classifieds
Thursday, August 1, 2013 • Page 5B
Decatur Daily Democrat
F O R
S A L E
BY OWNER
3BR, 2BA, Newer appliances, furnace,
windows, well, septic, new roof, fireplace,
new garage door, 2 car garage, finished
basement, energy efficient, 1 acre with
mature trees, also orchard. Stateline 2 miles
North of 224, 8570 N 700 E Decatur
260-244-0240 amer.axle@gmail.com
134 Brandywine Lane 1845 sq.ft house w/
575 sq.ft 2 car attached garage. 3BR/2Bath.
Newly remodelled kitchen & bathrooms. New
laminate flooring. Vaulted ceiling &fire place
in living room. New stainless steel appli-
ances. Priced to sell! 260-223-0266
Ranch Home for Sale. Anthony Wayne
Meadows. 3 Br, 2 Bath, 2 car garage, fenced
yard, 1571sf, new roof, heated floors, all
appliances included. 910 Yorktown Road
$133,900 OBO. Call 260-223-4455
3636 N. Shady Lane (Oakwood)
$250,000 Pictures and Description.
www.owners.com/WTW8442
4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 2 Fireplaces, 2
Kitchens, Finished Basement, Indoor Pool,
Elevator, Gym,Kennel, Wrap around
Driveway,...Everything Customized.
(260)724-7155
10195 N 200 E
Log cabin--1,800sq.ft. setting on 5
wooded acres, 3 possibly 4 bedrooms, 2
1/2 baths, utility room, full finishable
walkout basement, cathedral ceilings in
living area w/ catwalk, fireplace on main
floor and wood burner in basement,
geothermal heating/cooling, 40x63 pole
building w/ 14x14 overhead doors, 50x50
fenced kennel w/ 8x12 shed.
260-724-2783
3 Bedroom home on quiet street,
fireplace, refurbished hardwood floors
throughout, new doors, countertops and
linoleum, full basement. $65,000
728-2352
OPEN HOUSE!!!
Sun., Aug. 4th 1-3pm
210 N. 16th Street
Beautifully landscaped 3 Bedroom, 1 1/2
Bath ranch located
on quiet street and an extra large corner lot.
1380 sq ft w/2 car attached
garage. New roof, all new windows, and
newer floors, fixtures,
and water heater. Very clean home! Check
out pictures and more details at
www.forsalebyowner.com/23948552
or see it in person at the Open House!
260-701-2400
Quiet country living in a private setting,
located off Hwy 27, one mile South of I-
469. Charming 5 bedroom home on 8
acres with a 1 acre stocked pond.
For sale by owner
260-639-0338
Financial
Services
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$25.00 to start
Free Consultation,
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260-424-0954,
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Some restrictions
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(A)
Steam & Gas 32nd
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August 8-11
4-H Fairgrounds
1030 E 075 N
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Featuring: Case
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Sporting
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GUN SHOW!!
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August 3rd & 4th,
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Sun. 9-3 For infor-
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Thursday, August 1, 2013 @ 6:00pm
Kathleen Ann Mangine Estate
Auction to be held at the property on
100 W. just off US 27, just North of
intersection 900 N and US 27.
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday August 1st @ 6pm
Kathleen Ann Mangine Estate
Auction to be held at the property on 100 W just off US 27, just
North of intersection 900 N & US27
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday, August 1st @ 6:00pm
Karen Secaur-Owner
130 Wheat Ridge Ct., Decatur
North of Decatur on Monmouth Rd. to Piqua Rd.-turn left, con-
tinue to Honeysuckle Ln.-turn left, go to end of road, turn left on
Wheat Ridge Ct.
Household Items, Power Tools, Fishing Equipment, Lawn & Garden
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Friday, August 2, 2013 @ 5:00pm
Immanuel Lutheran Church
8538 N 500 E Decatur, In
Benefit Auction
Accepting new or good used donated items
Thursday Aug. 1st 9:00am-6:00pm and
Friday Aug. 2nd 9:00am-3:00pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
town-countryauctions.com
Friday, August 2, 2013 @ 5:00pm
Immanuel Lutheran Church
8538 N 500 E Decatur, In
Benefit Auction
Accepting new or good used donated items
Thursday Aug. 1st 9:00am-6:00pm and
Friday Aug. 2nd 9:00am-3:00pm
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
town-countryauctions.com
August 3, 2013 @ 10:00am (personal property) 11:00am
(real estate)
Heirs of The William C. Poulson Estate, David Brewer, Attorney
Bluffton National Guard, 500 E. Spring St., Bluffton, IN
Real Estate: 263.20 acres+/- of prime agricultural farmland.
Tract# 1: 98.96 Acres +/- Sect. 22 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 2: 71.47 Acres +/- Sect. 27 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 3: 40.77 Acres +/- Sect. 18 Harrison Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 4: 52.00 Acres +/- Sect. 10 Liberty Township, Wells Cnty, IN
Tract# 5: Tracts #1 - #2 - #3 & #4 (As An Entirety)
Car-2011 Toyota Camry, Tractors-WD-45 & D17 A.C., Lund fishing boat w/
60hp Johnson & other items, Truck-1979 GMC pickup
Ellenberger Brothers
Saturday August 3rd
Personal Property 9am Real Estate 12 noon
Open House Monday July 22nd (5-6pm)
Tony & Lynn Fuentes
2646 E 450 S Berne, IN
Real Estate- Tract 1- 2646 E 450 S 3400 sqft home has 5 bedrooms,
2 car garage on 12+/- acres w/ 1/2 acre pond & much, much more
Tract 2- 2656 E 450 S 1900 sqft ranch w/ 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car
attached garage on 5+/- acres w/ pole barn, FarmEquipment, Tools
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Clocks, Collectibles & Antique Auction
Saturday, August 3 @ 9am
Krueckeberg Auction Complex
815 Adams St, Decatur, IN
Lg Selection of Antiques & Collectibles! 200 Clocks plus Clock Parts!
30+ Tables of Glassware & Primitives! Antique Toys-Furniture-Art!
THE OLD CLOCK SHOP
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Tuesday August 6th @ 5:30pm
Reginald Myers Estate
Lu Ann Garton, Personal Representative
265 Center St., Berne, IN
Real Estate- 2 bedroom home
Personal Property, Furniture, Glassware & Collectibles
Miz Lehman Realtors & Auctioneers
www.mizlehman.com
Tuesday August 6, 2013 @ 6:00pm Judy Hawkins Estate
3320 N Salem Road, Decatur, IN
From intersection US 27 & US 33, go East on US 33 to Salem
Road, turn South Approximately 1 mile, watch for signs
Farm Land
Heartland Auction & Realty
Thursday August 8, @ 6:00pm
Auction conducted at Hoagland Hayloft
15112 Brunson Road, Hoagland, IN
LAND AUCTION
3 Farms 94.07 Acres 5 Tracts
Farm One 18.02 Tillable Acres
Morton Road, Ossian, IN
Marion Township•Section 33•Allen County•3 Tracts
Note: Potential Building Sites
Only Minutes from Decatur & Ft. Wayne
Farm Two 51.47 Tillable Acres
Hoagland Road, Hoagland, IN
Marion Township•Section 24•Allen County 1 Tract
Farm Three 24.58 Acres
Winchester Road, Decatur, IN
Root Township•Section 28•Adams County•1 Tract
20+/- Tillable Acres + 4.58 Acres Hunting/Recreation
CKB Farms, LLC, Owners
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Friday August 9, 2013 @ 4:00pm
E & M Blacksmith Shop Consignment
2404 W 350 S
2 1/2 miles North of Berne to Road 350 S. Then West 1 1/2 miles
Shop Equipment, Farm Machinery, Lawn & Garden, New handmade
Amish furniture, horses, buggies, carts, etc.
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
www.town-countryauctioneers.com
Friday, August 9, 2013 @ 5;00pm
Denver & Bertha Mae Neuenschwander
6090 W 950 S, Geneva, IN
Hwy 218 to Hwy 116, South on Hwy 116 to County Road 950 S,
West on 950 S.
Personal Property
Rob Green--Au19500011, Bill Liechty--Au01048441
Saturday, August 10 @ 9am RE @ 11am
Real Estate & Personal Property Auction
604 Homestead Ave, Ossian, IN
Rose Ann Heights Addition
Property Backs up to Maplecrest Park
3BR 2BA Ranch-LR W/ FP, kitchen w/ center island, Formal
Dining Rm, Concrete Patio, 3 Season Rm, Finished 2 car Att.
Gar; 1530sqft
2002 Buick Lesabre, 1986 Buick Park Avenue, Husgvarna Model
2554 Lawn Tractor, Collectibles, Furn & Household, Appliances,
Lawn/Garden, Exercise Equip, Tools
Henry Miller Spinet Piano & Bench
Calvin J. & Lois A. Smith, Owners
Kevin Smith Power of Attorney
Cindy Waldman Power of Attorney
Wiegmann Auctioneers
260-447-4311
WiegmannAuctioneers.com
Saturday, August 10th @ 10am
Mark and Sandra Freadenberg
5640 E 1000N
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: Home and nearly 2 acres
Personal Property is selling online @ littlejohnauctions.com
Tom Bauermeister for Littlejohnauctions Inc.
Tuesday August 13th @ 6pm
Will Morrison, Julie Adkins, & Dan Luebke - Owners
Section 21 St. Mary’s Township
34+/- acres of woods
16+/- acres of tillable ground
50+/- acres
Farm Land
Krueckeberg Auciton & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Thursday August 15th @ 6:00pm
Wilma Jean Liby
1221 N. 2nd St
Decatur, IN
Real Estate: 2 bedroom home w/ garage & full basement,
fenced yard
Dave Myers Town & Country Auctioneers/Realtors
August 15th @ 4pm RE @ 6pm
Butcher
1062 Russel St
Located South of downtown Decatur on Winchester St to Russel
to auction site
Open House August 5th 5-6pm
Real Estate, Personal Property, Antiques, Piano, Appliances, Lawn &
Garden, Household Items, Furniture
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
August 17th @ 9am RE @ Noon
Zephyr
195 State Line Road, Convoy, OH
Located East of Decatur, On US 224, To state line, then North
approx. 9 miles to auction site.
Open House August 6th • 5-6pm
Real Estate, Personal Property, Appliances, Lawn & Garden,
Household Item, Furniture
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Saturday August 17th @ 9:00am
Jerry & Sue Sprunger
646 Forest Park Drive, Berne, IN
Sale of Leather Furniture, Antiques, Collectibles, Tools, Garden
Tractor, Honda Mower, Tool Chest, American Fostoria, Flo Blu
Dishes, Generator, Pressure Sprayer, Garden Tools, Appliances
Miz Lehman Realtors-Auctioneers
260-589-2903. For complete sale bill go to
www.mizlehman.com or www.auctionzip.com
Thursday, August 22 @ 3:00pm
Don & Rebecca Henry
7030 Lortie Rd, Monroeville, IN
Personal Property, Household Items, Antiques, Power Tools,
Shop Equip., Tractor, Appliances, Farm Machinery, Furniture,
Collection, Lawn & Garden, Alpacas
Jerry Ehle
Schrader Real Estate & Auction
1-800-451-2709
www.schraderauction.com
August 23rd @ 10am
Decatur Mini & Self Storage
Various Locations in Decatur, IN
Personal Property
Krueckeberg Auction & Realty
www.kjauction.com
Saturday, August 24 @ 9am
Located @10374 NW Winchester Rd., Decatur, IN
9am Farm Related Items 10am Tractors & Equipment
IH Tractors, IH Combine & Heads, Grain Heads, JD Corn Planter &
JD Grain Drill, Tillage Equipment & Wagons, Augers, Sprayer, Rotary
Mower, Backhoe, Snow Blowers, Trailers, Cub Cadet Mower, 6000
Bushel Grain Bin, Farm Related Items & Shop Tools
This Equipment has been well maintained throughout the years and
has been housed and is in field ready condition.
Mike and Carol Selking, Owners
Wiegmann Auctioneers, 260-447-4311
www.wiegmannauctioneers.com
Tuesday, August 27, 2013 @ 6pm
Dale Doty & Barbara Ann Cotner
512 S. Sampson Road, Woodburn, IN
Real Estate: 77.4 Productive Tillable Acres sold as one contiguous
field, Farm Land
Jerry Ehle, Schrader Real Estate & Auction of Fort Wayne
260-749-0445 866-340-0445
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
BUSINESS & SERVICE DIRECTORY
REALTOR STORAGE
CONSTRUCTION
HEATING & COOLING
GUTTERS
DRILLING
PLUMBING
GRAIN ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTION
E X T R E M E
BUILDERS
32/(%$516‡*$5$*(6
522),1*‡6,',1*
&21&5(7(‡$'',7,216
& MORE
FREE ESTIMATES
(260)
223-3713
PAINTING
CONSTRUCTION
AUTO REPAIR
CONSTRUCTION
CARPET CLEANING
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RENT ME
CONCRETE REPAIR
BAKER’S TRI-STATE
CONCRETE LIFTING
260-301-1269
“WE RAISE
SETTLED
CONCRETE”
www.bakerstristateconcrete.com
PORCHES, PATIOS, DRIVEWAYS,
FLOORS, STEPS & SIDEWALKS
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Announcing New Hours!
Weekdays
7:30am - 7:00gm
Saturday
8:00am - 4:00gm
Sunday
11:00am - 2:00gm
Your OnIy LocaIIy Owned
Auto Parts Store
207 N. 3rd St. · Decatur · 724-3129
AUTO PARTS
AUCTION CALENDAR
Classifieds
Page • 6B Thursday, August 1, 2013
Decatur Daily Democrat
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When Buying or Selling,
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Decatur
Tony Beer
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260-724-8990
SUDOKU ® by American Profile
LEO (July
23-Aug. 22) --
Financial conditions
could be rather testy,
so it behooves you to
manage your resourc-
es as wisely as you can. Avoid all
excessive spending and don’t
borrow or lend out any money.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- If you fail to establish some
realistic objectives for yourself,
you could burn out striving for an
unattainable goal. Be practical,
and you’ll do fine.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) -- Don’t do anything that could
cause you problems today. You’re
in a cycle where you need to pay
strict attention to your inner judg-
ment. If you stray, you’ll regret it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- A domineering companion
might attempt to involve you in
something that you want no part
of. You’ll need to muster the nec-
essary resolve to stay out of trou-
ble.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- To underestimate
your competition would be a griev-
ous error. You’ll have to bring your
“A” game and go at it with every-
thing you’ve got.
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19) -- Review your tasks
and/or assignments first thing,
especially those that are distaste-
ful to you. If your heart isn’t in
your work, you could make things
worse.
AQUARIUS (Jan.
20-Feb. 19) -- Hard feelings will
result if you expect too much from
a joint endeavor. Of course, the
same might be true if your partner
expects too much from you as
well. All efforts must be equal.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Before you start finding fault
with your mate, keep in mind not
to blow things out of proportion.
Once you open Pandora’s box,
you might not be able to close it
again.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- Because you have acute
critical faculties, it is sometimes
easy for you to spot flaws in oth-
ers. However, should you see a
disturbance in someone today,
you’d be wise to keep it to your-
self.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- Your extravagant urges
could demand your attention,
making it possible for you to do
something financially foolish.
Before spending money outland-
ishly, remember how hard you
worked for it.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- The consequences of your
behavior could deleteriously affect
your colleagues. Make doubly
certain that your motives are con-
structive and noble.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- Under most conditions,
you’re not prone to holding grudg-
es, yet today some old complaints
might rear their heads. Try to for-
give and forget, and you’ll be a lot
happier.
Astro-Graph
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Puzzle #2835-M
Medium
1 2 3 4
5 4 6 7
3 8 9
2 8 7
9 6 4 3
3 8 1
8 5 3
3 4 1 2
7 4 9 5
Decatur Daily Democrat Thursday, August 1, 2013 • Page 7B
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Solution #2834-M
5 1 8 3 6 2 4 7 9
2 3 9 7 8 4 6 5 1
6 4 7 9 1 5 8 3 2
3 9 2 6 7 8 1 4 5
8 7 1 4 5 9 3 2 6
4 6 5 2 3 1 7 9 8
7 8 3 5 2 6 9 1 4
9 2 6 1 4 3 5 8 7
1 5 4 8 9 7 2 6 3
Beetle Bailey ® Mort Walker
THE FAMILY CIRCUS ®
by Bil Keane
THE LOCKHORNS ®
by Bunny Hoest and John Reiner
ZITS ® by Jerry Scott and Jim Burgman
THE BORN LOSER ® by Art and Chip Sansom
Blondie ® Dean Young & John Marshall
ARLO & JANIS ® by Jimmy Johnson
FRANK & ERNEST ® by Bob Thaves
BIG NATE ® by Lincoln Peirce
CRANKSHAFT ® by Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers
BABY BLUES ® by Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
THE GRIZZWELLS ® by Bill Schorr
RECYCLE
PLEASE
DECATUR DAILY
D E M O C R A T
Decatur Daily Democrat Page 8B • Thursday, August 1, 2013 SwiSS DayS
Lovely weather, big crowds, lots to
do ... and plenty of fun. Swiss Days
2013 in Berne was a dandy. Here
are some scenes from the four-day
event.
Four girls riding high
Big turnout for jam fest at clock tower
No fly zone:
Komets’ Icy D.
Eagle walks
parade route
Swiss Heritage Village teams up
Pay Crime Stoppers
and take a whack
Vintage fire truck leads way
Lined up for the tractor show
Dude, you’re too big for the car
Family
LifeCare
brings
out the
animals
Photos by Rebekah R. Blomenberg
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
August 1, 2013.pdf31.21 MB
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